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Frequently Asked Questions About Time Travel (2009)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Sci-Fi | 24 April 2009 (UK)
While drinking at their local pub, three social outcasts attempt to navigate a time-travel conundrum.

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Ray
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Meredith MacNeill ...
Ray Gardner ...
Nick Ewans ...
Arthur Nightingale ...
Old Man
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Storyline

The script, written by Jamie Mathieson, follows three social outcasts -- two geeks and a cynic -- as they attempt to navigate a time-travel conundrum in the middle of a British pub. Faris plays a girl from the future who sets the adventure in motion. Written by anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

24 April 2009 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Aikamatkustus FAQ  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$23,820 (UK) (26 April 2009)
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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Ray first meets Cassie she is wearing a necklace with a butterfly; possibly a nod to one of the most famous time travel short stories, 'A Sound of Thunder' by Ray Bradbury, where a time traveler changes the future (his present) by stepping on a butterfly in the distant past. See more »

Goofs

After Pete calls Ray and Toby in to the beer garden to look at the painting, a crew member can be seen as Toby is emerging from the pub. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Ray: Time travel. It'll turn your brain into spaghetti if you let it. Best not to think about it. Best just to get on with the job in hand. Which is destroying the enemy before they're even born and have a chance to threaten us. We're expecting any resistance to be light, because the ancestors of our enemies have yet to evolve any thumbs... or indeed spines. But that does not change the fact that they may one day evolve into a species that may pose a threat to us. And for that reason, ...
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Crazy Credits

SPOILER: After the end credits have finished, a 20 second scene features Toby (Dean Wootton) being chased by an animalistic double. As Ray (Chris O'Dowd) and Pete (Dean Lennox Kelly) look on, a double of Pete says "this is all getting a little bit too complicated." See more »

Connections

References Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Flea Circus
Written by Marc Marder (as Marder)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A smart and very funny take on the science-fiction genre.
21 October 2009 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Ray (Chris O'Dowd), Toby (Marc Wootton) and Pete (Dean Lennox Kelly) are out in the pub for the night, going through their usual rounds of beer, crisps and complaints about general things including movies, music and their dead-end lives in general. Well, they think they're facing a brick wall, but really things are about to get a little sci-fi—or, science fiction, if you're picky about that sort of thing. You see, when one of the guys goes into the toilet, he discovers that there's a "time-leak" somewhere within that causes them to leap back and forth along a timeline that risks all of them destroying the entire universe as they know it. Sound really nerdy? Well, it is. Except, it's not pedantic nerdy, but actually smart, witty and engagingly imaginer (don't ask). The resulting movie is one that excels in both situation and character comedy, whilst also telling a really good story to boot—while there are flaws in the entire design (most of which occur in the later stages as things get more and more complicated) Frequently Asked Questions About Time Travel is a short, but sweet take on the science-fiction comedy that knows how to strike up a laugh or two, but not at the expense of story or character.

Even though just about one of the three central actors has had major exposure on British TV and more recently, cinema, the performances are pitch-perfect. Striking a firm balance between realism and expertly timed gags, Dowd, Wootton and Kelly provide the movie with enough charm and "boy humour" to prevent the movie from sinking in a pile of convoluted, unfunny esoteric nonsense. Rather, the light-hearted presence of the three allows the feature to breathe with a sense of personality; while the film deals largely with two eccentric nerds and one slightly less nerdy partner in crime; these guys aren't your typical silver screen cutout stereotypes usually afforded to such personas. Instead, director Gareth Carrivick strives to maintain a sense of realism about his movie which permeates throughout.

Rather surprisingly this manifests itself not just in the characters, but in the hammy, sci-fi plot itself which involves the three jumping around time and avoiding bumping into themselves—thus avoiding deadly paradoxes. The extent to which writer Jamie Mathieson goes to avoid even the sternest of science-fiction nerds from having a fit over Grandfather Paradoxes and erroneous Chaos Theory debauchery is extremely welcome and really helps pad out the story even more than it is. Indeed, it could be argued that even though there are numerous timelines opened throughout the course of the movie, no real conflicts or holes are created at least until the final ten minutes. From here, things to get a little bit shifty for the sake of providing an ending that will please the average audience member, but even a little wink and a nod throughout this conclusion helps keep the movie's narrative in place. What results is a story that's not only refreshing through its willingness to go weird on you, but also through the sheer fact that weird never overcomes the viewer's suspension of belief.

In the end, FAQ About Time Travel does just about enough to strike a firm balance between story (which some will argue is king), character and silliness to ensure that your average viewer will be catered to. And while it isn't very likely that you will be blown away by the feature nor will it be emblazoned on your memory, the experience that is offers no matter how temporal, does well to entertain there and now. With some spot on performances and a tight script, Frequently Asked Questions is a smart and very funny take on the science-fiction genre that mixes situation with character humour effectively.

  • A review by Jamie Robert Ward (http://www.invocus.net)


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