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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 38 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Another Heartbreaking Look at the FX for The Thing Prequel

5 December 2016 4:41 PM, PST | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

It’s that special time of year again when Tom Woodruff, Jr. and Studio Adi release another behind-the-scenes look at one of the animatronic creatures we saw way too little of in The Thing prequel. We did see some of this,… Continue Reading →

The post Another Heartbreaking Look at the FX for The Thing Prequel appeared first on Dread Central. »

- Steve Barton

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The Lrm Interview: Joel Edgerton on His Role in Loving

9 November 2016 11:00 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Australian actor Joel Edgerton has been tooling around as an actor for quite some time--even playing Uncle Owen in George LucasStar Wars prequels--but he’s been making a bigger impact on these shores in recent years with dramatic roles in Warrior, The Thing, The Great Gatsby, Black Mass and other films. He even went behind the camera to direct last year’s thriller The Gift.

With his role in Jeff NicholsLoving—his second back-to-back film with Nichols after appearing in Midnight Special—Edgerton is starting to be taken more seriously as a potential Oscar nominee for his role as Richard Loving, a Virginia man who back in the late ’50s married his black sweetheart Mildred (Ruth Negga from Preacher), although it was illegal in the state for them to do so. They essentially leave their families behind and go into hiding until their story is discovered by the »

- Edward Douglas

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‘Arrival’ Could Never Have Been Made By a Studio: Here’s Why

9 November 2016 10:57 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Look under the hood and many of the Hollywood studios’ best movies are independently financed, like Paramount Pictures’ “Arrival.” The studio won the brainy sci-fi thriller in a Cannes 2014 bidding war, plunking down a record $20 million for North America and other territories — but only after it was already financed and packaged with Oscar-nominated Denis Villeneuve, Amy Adams, and Jeremy Renner.

Arrival” was initially developed at Twentieth Century Fox, where director-producer Shawn Levy’s 21 Laps Entertainment has sustained a rich first-look production deal for 10 years that stretches back to the first “Night at the Museum.” Levy, who studied English and Theater at Yale, has continued to direct family movies like “Cheaper By the Dozen” and DreamWorks’ “Real Steel;” meanwhile, 21 Laps also produced “Date Night,” the $2-million Sundance A24 hit “The Spectacular Now” (developed from the bestseller), and discovery Matt and Ross Duffer’s breakout sci-fi Netflix series “Stranger Things.”

 

Levy and »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Arrival’ Could Never Have Been Made By A Studio: Here’s Why — Consider This

9 November 2016 10:57 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Look under the hood and many of the Hollywood studios’ best movies are independently financed, like Paramount Pictures’ “Arrival.” The studio won the brainy sci-fi thriller in a Cannes 2014 bidding war, plunking down a record $20 million for North America and other territories — but only after it was already financed and packaged with Oscar-nominated Denis Villeneuve, Amy Adams, and Jeremy Renner.

Arrival” was initially developed at Twentieth Century Fox, where director-producer Shawn Levy’s 21 Laps Entertainment has sustained a rich first-look production deal for 10 years that stretches back to the first “Night at the Museum.” Levy, who studied English and Theater at Yale, has continued to direct family movies like “Cheaper By the Dozen” and DreamWorks’ “Real Steel;” meanwhile, 21 Laps also produced “Date Night,” the $2-million Sundance A24 hit “The Spectacular Now” (developed from the bestseller), and discovery Matt and Ross Duffer’s breakout sci-fi Netflix series “Stranger Things.”

 

Levy and »

- Anne Thompson

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Arrival movie review: how to talk to aliens and expand your consciousness

8 November 2016 2:11 PM, PST | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take…

Intelligent, intense, grownup science fiction that will thrill genre lovers and satisfy fans of moving human drama. A beautiful, thought-provoking film. I’m “biast” (pro): huge science fiction fan; desperate for movies about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Gravity in October 2013. Interstellar in November 2014. The Martian in October 2015. And Arrival right now. Is autumn Hollywood’s new go-to time for intelligent, intense, grownup science fiction drama? It looks like. It’s a shame we appear to have only one slot for such a film each year, but, you know, baby steps. And each year’s installment has been better than the last: Arrival is a wonder, a beautiful movie that will thrill fans of real science fiction, of the literature of paradigm-busting ideas, as well as those »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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The Lrm Interview: Arrival Screenwriter Eric Heisserer

8 November 2016 8:37 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Screenwriter Eric Heisserer didn’t have a fast and easy path to success in Hollywood, and like many writers who go out to the land of dreams, he had been writing scripts “on spec” for years before he started getting credited screenwriting work. His first paid job was writing the screenplay for the 2008 A Nightmare on Elm Street remake, and he remained working in horror by writing The Thing prequel and Final Destination 5. (He also wrote and produced the recent horror hit Lights Out.)

At the same time, Heisserer continued to work on his own dream projects, including an adaptation of Ted Chiang’s short sci-fi story “The Story of Your Life,” and after years of development, Sicario director Denis Villeneuve expressed interest in making a movie on the story and they were off to the races for what would become Arrival.

Arrival stars Amy Adams as Dr. Louise Brooks, »

- Edward Douglas

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Sandman adaptation loses its screenwriter as “it needs to go to TV” rather than a movie

7 November 2016 5:30 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Warner Bros. and New Line Cinema’s planned adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Sandman comic book series has hit another stumbling block, with screenwriter Eric Heisserer (A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Thing) exiting the project after coming to the conclusion that it is better suited as a TV series rather than a movie.

“I had many conversations with Neil [Gaiman] on this, and I did a lot of work on the feature and came to the conclusion that the best version of this property exists as an HBO series or limited series, not as a feature film, not even as a trilogy,”Heisserer tells io9. “The structure of the feature film really doesn’t mesh with this. So I went back and said here’s the work that I’ve done. This isn’t where it should be. It needs to go to TV. So I talked myself out of a job! »

- Gary Collinson

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Sandman: is Neil Gaiman's comic masterpiece unfilmable?

4 November 2016 11:52 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The adaptation of the author’s classic work has been shedding writers, directors and has left some people wondering if the project is cursed

Perhaps we should be calling it “The Curse of Sandman”. Another screenwriter who was on board to work on the long-proposed movie adaptation of the Neil Gaiman-penned comic book appears to have jumped ship.

Eric Heisserer, whose credits include the recent remakes of 80s horror staples Nightmare on Elm Street and The Thing, was hired back in March by New Line as the latest writer for its troubled project to bring the DC/Vertigo comics series to the big screen. Heisserer was brought in just after director and actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt left the movie, citing creative differences with Warner subsidiary New Line.

Continue reading »

- David Barnett

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Sandman Movie Writer Quits, Wants a TV Show Instead

4 November 2016 10:34 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Back in March, New Line Cinema's highly-anticipated adaptation of Sandman suffered a huge blow when it lost Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who had been attached to both direct and star in the movie. Today we have word that the project has now lost its screenwriter, Eric Heisserer, who came aboard in March, just one day after Joseph Gordon-Levitt left the project. While doing press for his new movie Arrival, the writer says he's taken himself off the project, and that this Neil Gaiman comic would be better suited as a TV show.

io9 caught up with Eric Heisserer, whose other writing credits include this year's hit low-budget thriller Lights Out, Hours, The Thing, Final Destination 5 and The Nightmare on Elm Street reboot. The writer says he just couldn't see eye to eye with the studio about the direction a Sandman movie should take. Here's what Eric Heisserer had to say »

- MovieWeb

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2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Adapted Screenplay

18 October 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Hollywood is rarely in search of the new, so each year brings a longer list of adapted screenplays and a shorter list of originals.

Sundance launched American indie-in-Paris Whit Stillman’s witty adaptation of an early epistolary Jane Austen novella, “Love & Friendship,” which boasted rave reviews for Kate Beckinsale as a bitchy gold-digging mom, and long legs at the arthouse box office ($14 million).

Veteran indie distributor James Schamus returned to his first love, screenwriting, for his well-reviewed directorial debut “Indignation,” adapting the Philip Roth novel about college love, which performed modestly at domestic arthouses ($3.3 million). Lesser-known “Indignation” fared better with Roth than rookie director-star Ewan McGregor and writer John Romano’s film version of the better-known novel “American Pastoral.”

Writer-director Rebecca Miller’s sixth feature, sophisticated New York comedy of manners “Maggie’s Plan,” earned strong kudos at Toronto and Sundance but scored modestly on the specialty circuit ($3.5 million). Woody Allen aside, »

- Anne Thompson

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2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Adapted Screenplay

18 October 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hollywood is rarely in search of the new, so each year brings a longer list of adapted screenplays and a shorter list of originals.

Sundance launched American indie-in-Paris Whit Stillman’s witty adaptation of an early epistolary Jane Austen novella, “Love & Friendship,” which boasted rave reviews for Kate Beckinsale as a bitchy gold-digging mom, and long legs at the arthouse box office ($14 million).

Veteran indie distributor James Schamus returned to his first love, screenwriting, for his well-reviewed directorial debut “Indignation,” adapting the Philip Roth novel about college love, which performed modestly at domestic arthouses ($3.3 million). Lesser-known “Indignation” fared better with Roth than rookie director-star Ewan McGregor and writer John Romano’s film version of the better-known novel “American Pastoral.”

Global juggernauts were two Disney movies that both seem animated, but only one will vie for Best Animated Feature. That’s Andrew Stanton’s Pixar sequel “Finding Dory,” an ingenious extension »

- Anne Thompson

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James McAvoy to star in sci-fi action thriller Extinction

12 September 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Deadline is reporting that James McAvoy is in talks to join the sci-fi action thriller Extinction, which is being produced by Good Universe and Mandeville Films.

The plot revolves around “a man haunted by nightmares in which his wife is assaulted and who becomes a hero when Earth is invaded by an army bent on destruction.” McAvoy would play the lead, described as “a father and chief mechanic at a factory who realizes those invading might not be what he expected.”

Several writers have worked on Extinction, including Brad Caleb Kane (Marco Polo) and Eric Heisserer (The Thing), and the search is currently underway for a director to helm the project.

McAvoy was most recently seen as Charles Xavier in this year’s X-Men: Apocalypse; his upcoming projects include M. Night Shyamalan’s Split, Wim WendersSubmergence, and a TV adaptation of Watership Down.

»

- Gary Collinson

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‘Arrival’ review [Tiff ’16]

10 September 2016 9:51 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Arrival review: Denis Villeneuve enters the realms of science fiction with a first-contact movie with a glittering cast, including Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner.

Arrival review by Paul Heath, Tiff ’16.

Arrival comes to Toronto following an impressive debut at Venice where awards buzz fermented for Denis Villeneuve‘s latest a sci-fi marvel ambitious in approach though grounded in realism and scientific accuracy.

Amy Adams plays the lead role of Dr. Louise Banks, a linguist who is recruited by the Us government – specifically Forest Whitaker’s military guy Colonel Weber – to help them decode intricate messages delivered by alien crafts that have popped up at various locations throughout the world. Banks is aided by Jeremy Renner‘s Dr. Ian Connelly who is supporting on the scientific side of things at one of the twelve craft sites in rural Montana. With constant communication between them and the other eleven sites, the duo »

- Paul Heath

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Lights Out review

11 August 2016 3:39 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Published Date  Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 05:00

What happens if you take a Steven Moffat-alike horror concept, but remove the mad man in a box and all the other comfortable Doctor Who trappings, and sub in some family drama and serious psychological scares? As it turns out, you get a taut 81 minutes of effective terror.

Lights Out is a film that leaves a lasting impression. This is because it preys on our most primordial fears and one of the oldest questions in The Big Book Of Scary Things: what’s going on in the dark? 

Director David F Sandberg – who also wrote and directed the short film on which Eric Heisserer (2010’s A Nightmare On Elm StreetThe Thing remake, Final Destination 5) based the feature-length Lights Out screenplay – isn’t the first person to tackle this sort of topic on screen, and he certainly won’t be the last. »

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Screenwriter Eric Heisserer on Lights Out, The Rules of Horror and Collaborating with James Wan

27 July 2016 10:11 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Eric Heisserer bristles at the label of horror movie screenwriter. It’s understandable. While his produced credits include a Final Destination sequel and the remakes of The Thing and A Nightmare on Elm Street, Heisserer points out that he has authored 56 feature film scripts and only eight of them have been in the horror genre. That connotation may change later this year when Heisserer’s screenplay for the sci-fi film Arrival hits screens from Prisoners and Sicario director Denis Villeneuve. But for now Heisserer and I are talking about Lights Out, a new horror offering based on director David F. Sandberg’s […] »

- Matt Mulcahey

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Lights Out Reinvents Classic Horror in a Fresh Way

21 July 2016 12:58 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

One thing I always look forward to when going to any horror movie, is seeing.... well, mostly hearing, how the audience reacts. While I love movies like The Witch, which is so engrossing and intense that you can hear a pin drop in the theater, I really adore movies that scare the s--t out of people, to the point where I can hear their reactions. For me, the more unusual and natural the reactions are a sign that this particular movie is quite effective, and the reactions I heard during Lights Out made it so much more fun, for me anyway. I'm not sure how much fun it was for the woman, who let out piercing shrieks every time a jump-scare moment happened and would rapidly stomp her feet on the ground like Thumper, but it was just one of many reasons why I loved Lights Out.

I didn't know »

- MovieWeb

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Interview: Writer Eric Heisserer on His Approach to Lights Out and Meeting Modern Horror Fans’ Expectations

7 July 2016 4:26 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

In just six or so years, writer Eric Heisserer has been involved with several high-profile horror projects, including Final Destination 5, The Thing (2011), and even the ill-fated remake of A Nightmare on Elm Street (more on that later), but it’s his latest script for David Sandberg’s Lights Out that is undoubtedly his best work thus far in his career.

A thoughtful examination of fear and mental illness that still manages to have a bit of a playful streak to it as well, Lights Out is an expanded take on Sandberg’s original short film from a few years back that will undoubtedly give viewers many new reasons to be afraid of the dark. It stars Maria Bello as Sophie, a mother suffering from depression, whose “special friend” Diana can only travel within the confines of total darkness and is fixated on having Sophie all to herself. Of course, »

- Heather Wixson

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11 DC Comics movies awaiting a greenlight

15 May 2016 10:47 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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From Justice League Dark and The Batman to Lobo and Man Of Steel 2 - the DC movies that await a greenlight...

Big spoilers lie ahead for Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice

Whichever side of the imaginary rivalry you fall into, there's no denying that when it comes to movies, DC has got some catching up to do. In the same year as Marvel Studios released their first major crossover, The Avengers, Warner Bros released The Dark Knight Rises, the final chapter in Christopher Nolan's acclaimed Batman trilogy, which was firmly grounded in the notion that Bruce Wayne is the world's only superhero.

Nolan's disinterest in the larger DC toybox left Warners a few steps behind Disney and Marvel, especially after the failure of 2010's Jonah Hex and 2011's Green Lantern, the latter of which was intended as the first step into a wider universe. »

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Exclusive interview: Writer/ Director Marc Abraham For ‘I Saw The Light’

6 May 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

In U.K. cinemas from today is the music biopic of Hank Williams, I Saw The Light. The film stars Tom Hiddleston as the legendary country star, and Elizabeth Olsen as his wife Audrey.

Earlier on this week, we caught up with the film’s writer, producer and director Marc Abraham to talk about his new film. As well as I Saw The Light, Abraham is the producer behind films like Air Force One, the remake of The Thing, Children Of Men, and Dawn Of The Dead (amongst many others).

Catch our exclusive interview below. I Saw The Light is in U.K. cinemas from today, Friday May 6th, 2016. You can read our review here.

I Saw the Light,” the story of the legendary country western singer Hank Williams, who in his brief life created one of the greatest bodies of work in American music. The film chronicles his meteoric »

- Paul Heath

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Universal Monsters: The Next Big Cinematic Franchise?

5 May 2016 12:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tony Black on whether the Universal Monsters will deliver the next big cinematic franchise…

You all remember The Mummy, right? Brendan Fraser doing his best Harrison Ford impression while Arnold Vosloo pranced around in a gold nappy trying to hide his broad South African brogue. Rather good, wasn’t it? You may be surprised to learn it came out in 1999. Some readers of this may not have been born then! The Mummy Returns followed in 2001 and then The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor in 2008 (but we don’t talk about that), with a Dwayne Johnson-starring The Scorpion King spin-off wedged in between. Had these films all came out a decade later, chances are they would have been much more of a cinematic universe, which of course are hot stuff these days thanks to Marvel’s successes in the superhero genre. Universal Pictures got into the act last year »

- Tony Black

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