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First Look: Dylan O'Brien As Mitch Rapp in American Assassin

13 September 2016 5:33 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

CBS Films has released the first look at Dylan O'Brien as Mitch Rapp in American Assassin

American Assassin follows the rise of Mitch Rapp (Dylan O'Brien) a CIA black ops recruit under the instruction of Cold War veteran Stan Hurley (Michael Keaton). The pair is then enlisted by CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy (Sanaa Lathan) to investigate a wave of apparently random attacks on both military and civilian targets. Together the three discover a pattern in the violence leading them to a joint mission with a lethal Turkish agent (Shiva Negar) to stop a mysterious operative (Taylor Kitsch) intent on starting a World War in the Middle East.

The film is being directed by acclaimed filmmaker Michael Cuesta (Kill The Messenger, Homeland, L.I.E.) from a screenplay by Stephen Schiff (The Americans, Ultimate Rush). 

Published by Atria Books and in mass market paperback by Pocket Books, both imprints of Simon & Schuster, »

- Kellvin Chavez

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‘The Promise’ review [Tiff ’16]

13 September 2016 4:22 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The Promise review: Oscar Isaac gains leading man status in this extensive historical epic set at the end of the First World War when Turkey executed over 1.5 million Armenians.

The Promise review by Paul Heath, Toronto International Film Festival 2016.

The Promise review

The film opens with a truly eye-opening and terrifying title card – one that states that 1.5 million Armenians were killed by the Turkish during World War I. I was aware of the terrible genocide that occurred during the war, but my sheer ignorance wasn’t aware of its horrific scale.

Terry George directs this epic, ambitious depiction of this horrific mass genocide from one hundred or so years ago. Set in Turkey, the film follows medical student Michael (Oscar Isaac), a brilliant young man who takes the firm decision to settle down with a local girl (Angela Sarafyan) to secure his position at a prestigious school in Constantinople (now »

- Paul Heath

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First Look: Dylan O’Brien As Mitch Rapp In American Assassin

12 September 2016 5:11 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Catch this first look at Dylan O’Brien as Mitch Rapp in American Assassin.

American Assassin follows the rise of Mitch Rapp (Dylan O’Brien) a CIA black ops recruit under the instruction of Cold War veteran Stan Hurley (Michael Keaton). The pair is then enlisted by CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy (Sanaa Lathan) to investigate a wave of apparently random attacks on both military and civilian targets. Together the three discover a pattern in the violence leading them to a joint mission with a lethal Turkish agent (Shiva Negar) to stop a mysterious operative (Taylor Kitsch) intent on starting a World War in the Middle East.

The film is being directed by filmmaker Michael Cuesta (Kill The Messenger, Homeland, L.I.E.) from a screenplay by Stephen Schiff (The Americans, Ultimate Rush).

Published by Atria Books and in mass market paperback by Pocket Books, both imprints of Simon & Schuster, American Assassin »

- Michelle McCue

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[Tiff Review] The Promise

12 September 2016 3:45 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Terry George‘s The Promise begins with a title card that appears on-screen stating that 1.5 million Armenians were killed by the Turkish government during World War I. It’s a tragedy that has been depicted before in film, perhaps most notably in Atom Egoyan’s underwhelming Ararat, with ample room still made available to deliver the definitive version. Despite formidable talent on both sides of the camera, unfortunately we’ll have to wait longer for such a drama to arrive.

The film takes place on the brink of World War I in Turkey. Michael (Oscar Isaac), an intelligent, compassionate Armenian, decides to settle down and marry a girl (Angela Sarafyan) that he’s not completely smitten by, but claims that with time he will indeed love her. He lives in Armenia, but opts to journey to Turkey, without his wife, to study medicine at the Imperial Medical School and become »

- The Film Stage

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First Look at Dylan O'Brien as Mitch Rapp in American Assassin

12 September 2016 3:14 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

CBS Films and Lionsgate have issued a first look at Dylan O'Brien as the iconic Mitch Rapp from Vince Flynn's beloved novels in American Assassin. For fans of the books, this image, taken from Dylan O'Brien's camera tests, will be quite familiar. Here's what the official Twitter account for the movie had to say in a series of tweets, before the photo was released.

"A Bts image from @dylanobrien's camera test as Mitch Rapp. It's going to be a busy week for American Assassin fans. Wow, so the image is stunning but for longtime @dylanobrien fans there may be an initial shock as Mitch Rapp is a decidedly adult role. For longtime Vince Flynn fans, there will be an immediate recognition of an early moment for Mitch Rapp as he emerges into the man they know."

American Assassin follows the rise of Mitch Rapp (Dylan O'Brien), a CIA »

- MovieWeb

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American Assassin Adds Sanaa Lathan And Shiva Negar To Dylan O’Brien, Michael Keaton, And Taylor Kitsch

8 September 2016 9:03 AM, PDT | AreYouScreening.com | See recent AreYouScreening news »

There has been a lot of talk about the adaptation of Vince Flynn’s American Assassin, much of it obviously because the Mitch Rapp franchise of books has done exceedingly well, but also because the casting news has made people wonder.

Fans of the series have wondered about Maze Runner star, Dylan O’Brien filling the role, but were apparently just as quick to hold out hope with Michael Keaton on board.

CBS Films and Lionsgate have now announced two more actors, and their roles, which rounds out the main players in the film.

Sanaa Lathan will play Irene Kennedy, the CIA Deputy Director who puts Rapp and his mentor, Stan Hurley (Keaton), on the case in question, and Shiva Negar is the Turkish agent who puts them onto the mysterious operative (Taylor Kitsch) who is apparently behind trying to kick off a war in the Middle East.

Sanaa Lathan »

- Marc Eastman

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Sanaa Lathan and Shiva Hegar Join Micheal Keaton in American Assassin

7 September 2016 8:46 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Bs Films and Lionsgate (NYSE: Lgf) announced today that Sanaa Lathan (The Perfect Guy, Now You See Me 2) and Shiva Negar (Four In The Morning, The Art Of More) are joining Dylan O’Brien (Deepwater Horizon, The Maze Runner), Academy Award®-nominee Michael Keaton (Birdman, Spotlight) and Taylor Kitsch (Lone Survivor, True Detective) in the adaptation of Vince Flynn’s massive bestseller American Assassin.  Acclaimed filmmaker Michael Cuesta (Kill The Messenger, Homeland, L.I.E.) will direct the thriller from a screenplay by Stephen Schiff (The Americans, Ultimate Rush).  Lorenzo di Bonaventura (Transformers, Deepwater Horizon, Salt) and Nick Wechsler (The Road, Magic Mike) are producing the film.                                American Assassin follows the rise of Mitch Rapp (Dylan O’Brien) a CIA black ops recruit under the instruction of Cold War veteran Stan Hurley (Michael Keaton).  The pair is then enlisted by CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy (Sanaa Lathan) to investigate a wave »

- Tom Stockman

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New to Streaming: ‘De Palma,’ ‘Sunset Song,’ ‘Melancholia,’ ‘The Jungle Book,’ and More

26 August 2016 9:10 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Blood Father (Jean-François Richet)

If this be the movie jail that Mel Gibson is destined to die in, it could be a whole lot worse. Blood Father, directed by Jean-François Richet (Mesrine, Assault on Precinct 13), works remarkably well as a grindhouse throwback, sporting a screenplay (from Peter Craig and Andrea Berloff, based on Craig’s novel) that’s better than it has any right to be. »

- The Film Stage

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Tiff Adds ‘I, Daniel Blake,’ ‘Julieta,’ ‘Personal Shopper,’ ‘The Unknown Girl,’ ‘Voyage of Time’ And Many More

16 August 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Toronto International Film Festival is mere weeks from kicking off, yet the annual fall fest is showing zero sign of slowing down when it comes to announcing the titles that will round out this year’s event. Today’s announcement brings with it a number of Cannes favorites, including Ken Loach’s Palme d’Or-winning “I, Daniel Blake,” Olivier Assayas’ divisive Kristen Stewart-starring “Personal Shopper” and Pedro Almodovar’s “Julieta.”

Read More: Tiff Reveals First Slate of 2016 Titles, Including ‘Magnificent Seven,’ ‘American Honey,’ ‘La La Land’ and ‘Birth of A Nation’

The slate will also play home to the Dardenne Brothers’ latest, “The Unknown Girl,” which has reportedly been through an edit since it debuted at Cannes earlier this year. Other standouts from Cannes include Kleber Mendonça Filho’s “Aquarius,” Boo Junfeng’s “Apprentice,” Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation,” Brillante Ma Mendoza’s “Ma’ Rosa” and Cristi Puiu’s “Sieranevada. »

- Kate Erbland

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Cate Blanchett Stars in the New John Hillcoat-Directed Massive Attack Video for ‘The Spoils’ — Watch

9 August 2016 10:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cate Blanchett is front and center in the latest Massive Attack video for their single “The Spoils,” released Tuesday.

Featuring Mazzy Star singer Hope Sandoval, the six-minute clip is an eerie visual that shows the Oscar-winning actress’ face in front of a black backdrop. Highlighting her features from all angles, she then undergoes a transformation and morphs until her face turns to stone.

Read More: Cate Blanchett In Talks To Join Female ‘Ocean’s Eleven’

“The Spoils” is directed by John Hillcoat, the Australian director known for his films “Lawless,” “The Road” and most recently “Triple 9” starring Casey Affleck, Chiwetel Ejiofor and Kate Winslet. He’s previously also helmed music videos for Bob Dylan and Depeche Mode.

Massive Attack’s latest single is the second part of a two-song release, with “Come Near Me” released last month. The English group has previously featured well-known actresses and celebrities in their videos. »

- Liz Calvario

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Exclusive: Hear 2 Tracks By Nick Cave & Warren Ellis From The ‘Hell Or High Water’ Soundtrack

28 July 2016 8:25 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Soundtracks don’t get much better or more distinct than Nick Cave and Warren Ellis‘ work as such. The duo has contributed music to films like “Lawless,” “The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford,” “The Road,” “The Proposition,” among others. Their work is often evocatively haunting, gritty and intimate, and they bring those qualities […]

The post Exclusive: Hear 2 Tracks By Nick Cave & Warren Ellis From The ‘Hell Or High Water’ Soundtrack appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Edward Davis

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The Night Of Recap: And When He's Dissed... Oooh, Fire!

24 July 2016 7:03 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Well, that settles it. After this week’s installment of The Night Of, I’m swearing off even the most innocuous misdemeanors, like jaywalking or tossing a martini in the face of Ann Coulter.

Comic-con 2016 Exclusive Videos, Casting News, Scoop and More

From the opening images (rolls of barbed wire dotted with fluttering plastic bags) right through that closing shot of Naz’s cot engulfed in flames, I felt like I’d been completely immersed in the Rikers Island expeirence along with the wide-eyed college student indicted for a murder I’m pretty sure he didn’t commit.

Thanks to »

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The 50 Best Sci-Fi Films of the 21st Century Thus Far

19 July 2016 10:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

In a medium founded on expanding one’s imagination and perception of reality, no genre does it better than science fiction. We’ve come a long way from the days when Georges Méliès took us to the moon, for today’s filmmakers look far beyond our universe and into the deepest corners of our soul to reflect the current society.

With the latest entry in the Star Trek franchise arriving in theaters this week, we’ve set out to reflect on the millennium’s sci-fi films that have most excelled. To note: we only stuck with feature-length works of 60 minutes or longer and, to make room for a few more titles, our definition of “the 21st century” stretched to include 2000.

Check out our top 50 below and let us know your favorites in the comments. We’ve also put the list on Letterboxd to keep track of how many you’ve seen. »

- The Film Stage

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Nick Cave, Warren Ellis Score Upcoming Jeff Bridges Western

12 July 2016 5:09 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Nick Cave and his Bad Seeds and Grinderman bandmate, Warren Ellis, have scored the upcoming contemporary western, Hell or High Water, starring Jeff Bridges and Chris Pine.

Directed by David Mackenzie, Hell or High Water tells the story of Toby (Pine), a divorced father who plots a series of bank heists with his ex-con brother, Tanner (Ben Foster), in order to keep the family's house from foreclosure. Bridges, meanwhile, plays Marcus, a Texas Ranger trying to stop the brothers in the weeks before his retirement.

Hell or High Water premiered »

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Nick Cave, Warren Ellis Score Upcoming Jeff Bridges Western

12 July 2016 5:09 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Nick Cave and his Bad Seeds and Grinderman bandmate, Warren Ellis, have scored the upcoming contemporary western, Hell or High Water, starring Jeff Bridges and Chris Pine.

Directed by David Mackenzie, Hell or High Water tells the story of Toby (Pine), a divorced father who plots a series of bank heists with his ex-con brother, Tanner (Ben Foster), in order to keep the family's house from foreclosure. Bridges, meanwhile, plays Marcus, a Texas Ranger trying to stop the brothers in the weeks before his retirement.

Hell or High Water premiered »

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Cinemax Sets "Quarry" Date & Trailer

24 June 2016 7:05 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Following on from "The Knick" and the recently premiered "Outcast," Cinemax has set a September 9th premiere date for its original series "Quarry" which boast a pilot by John Hillcoat ("The Proposition," "The Road").

Based on the novel by Max Allan Collins ("Road to Perdition"), Logan Marshall-Green stars in the series as a Marine who returns home to Memphis from Vietnam in 1972 and finds himself shunned by those he loves and demonized by the public

As he struggles to cope with his experiences at war, he is drawn into a network of killing and corruption that spans the length of the Mississippi River. Peter Mullan, Damon Herriman, Jodi Balfour, Nikki Amuka-Bird and Jamie Hector also star. Check out the first trailer below:

Source: TV Line »

- Garth Franklin

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13 great modern thriller directors

14 June 2016 9:59 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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They’ve made some of the best thrillers of the past six years. We list some of the best modern thriller directors currently working...

Director Guillermo del Toro once described suspense as being about the withholding of information: either a character knows something the audience doesn’t know, or the audience knows something the character doesn’t. That’s a deliciously simple way of describing something that some filmmakers often find difficult to achieve: keeping viewers on the edges of their seats.

The best thrillers leave us scanning the screen with anticipation. They invite us to guess what happens next, but then delight in thwarting expectations. We can all name the great thriller filmmakers of the past - Alfred Hitchcock, Carol Reed, Brian De Palma - but what about the current crop of directors? Here’s our pick of the filmmakers who’ve made some great modern thrillers over the past six years - that is, between the year 2010 and the present.

Jeremy Saulnier - Blue Ruin, Green Room

To think there was once a time when Jeremy Saulnier was seriously quitting the film business.

“To be honest," Saulner told us back in 2014, “Macon and I had really given up on our quest to break into the industry and become legitimate filmmakers. So what we were trying to do with Blue Ruin was archive our 20 year arc and bring it to a close. Really just revisit our stomping grounds and use locations that were near and dear to us and build a narrative out of that.”

Maybe this personal touch explains at least partly why Blue Ruin wound up getting so much attention in Cannes in 2013, signalling not the end of Saulnier and his star Macon Blair’s career, but a brand new chapter. But then again, there’s more than just hand-crafted intimacy in Saulnier’s revenge tale; there’s also its lean, minimal storytelling and the brilliance of its characterisation. Blue Ruin is such an effective thriller because its protagonist is so atypical: sad-eyed, inexperienced with guns, somewhat soft around the edges, Macon Blair’s central character is far from your typical righteous avenger.

Green Room, which emerged in the UK this year, explores a similar clash between very ordinary people and extraordinary violence. A young punk band shout about anarchy and aggression on stage, but they quickly find themselves out of their depth when they’re cornered by a group of bloodthirsty neo-Nazis. In Saulnier’s films, grubby, unseemly locations are matched by often beautiful locked-off shots. Familiar thriller trappings are contrasted by twists of fortune that are often shocking.

Denis Villeneuve - Sicario, Prisoners

Here’s one of those directors who can pack an overwhelming sense of dread in a single image: in Sicario, his searing drug-war thriller from last year, it was the sight of tiny specks of dust falling in the light scything through a window. That single shot proved to be the calm before the storm, as Villeneuve unleashed a salvo of blood-curdling events: an attempted FBI raid on a building gone horribly awry. And this, I think, is the brilliance of Villeneuve’s direction, and why he’s so good at directing thrillers like Sicario or 2013’s superb Prisoners - he understands the rhythm of storytelling, and how scenes of quiet can generate almost unbearable tension.

Another case in point: the highway sequence in Sicario, where Emily Blunt’s FBI agent is stuck in a traffic jam outside one of the most violent cities in the world. Villeneueve makes us feel the stifling heat and the claustrophobia; something nasty’s going to happen, we know that - but it’s the sense of anticipation which makes for such an unforgettable scene.

Prisoners hews closely to the template of a modern mystery thriller, but it’s once again enriched by Villeneuve’s expert pacing and the performances he gets out of his actors. Hugh Jackman’s seldom been better as a father on the hunt for his missing child, while Jake Gyllenhaal mesmerises as a cop scarred by his own private traumas.

Lynne Ramsay - We Need To Talk About Kevin

Ramsay’s We Need To Talk About Kevin may be the most effective psychological thriller of recent years. About the difficult relationship between a mother (Tilda Swinton) and her distant, possibly sociopathic son (Ezra Miller), Ramsay’s film is masterfully told from beginning to end - which is impressive, given that the source novel by Lionel Shriver is told via a series of letters. Ramsay takes the raw material from the book and crafts something cinematic and highly disturbing: a study of guilt, sorrow and recrimination. Tension bubbles even in casual conversations around the dinner table. Miller is an eerie, cold-eyed blank. Swinton is peerless. One scene, in which Swinton’s mother comes home in the dead of night, is unforgettable. Here’s hoping Ramsay returns with another feature film very soon.

Morten Tyldum - Headhunters

All kinds of thrillers have emerged from Scandinavia over the past few years, whether on the large or small screen or in book form. Morten Tyldum’s Headhunters is among the very best of them. The fast-paced and deliriously funny story of an art thief who steals a painting from the wrong guy, Headhunters launched Tyldum on an international stage - Alan Turing drama The Imitation Game followed, and the Sony sci-fi film Passengers is up next. It isn’t hard to see why, either: Headhunters shows off Tyldum’s mastery of pace and tone, as his pulp tale hurtles from intense chase scenes to laugh-out-loud black comedy.

Joel Edgerton - The Gift

Granted, Joel Edgerton’s better known as an actor, having turned in some superb performances in the likes of Warrior, Zero Dark Thirty and Warror. But with a single film - The Gift, which he wrote, directed, produced and starred in - Edgerton established himself as a thriller filmmaker of real promise. About a successful, happily married couple whose lives are greatly affected by an old face from the husband’s past, The Gift is an engrossing, unsettling movie with superb performances from Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall as well as Edgerton.

A riff on the ‘killer in our midst’ thrillers of the 80s and 90s - The Stepfather, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle and so on - The Gift is all the more effective because of its restraint. We’re never quite sure who the villain of the piece is, at least at first - and Edgerton’s use of the camera leaves us wrong-footed at every turn. The world arguably needs more thrillers from Joel Edgerton.

If you haven’t seen The Gift yet, we’d urge you to track it down.

David Michod - Animal Kingdom

The criminals at play in this true-life crime thriller are all the more chilling because they’re so mundane - a bunch of low-level thieves, murderers and gangsters who prowl around the rougher parts of Melbourne, Australia. Writer-director David Michod spent years developing Animal Kingdom, and it was worth the effort: it’s an intense, engrossing film, for sure, but it’s also a believable glimpse of the worst of human nature. Ben Mendelsohn and Jacki Weaver play villains of different kinds; the latter a manipulative grandmother who looks over her brood of criminals, the former a spiteful thief. Crafting moments of incredible tension from simple exchanges, Michod launched himself as a formidable talent with this feature debut.

Ben Affleck - The Town, Argo

Affleck’s period drama-thriller Argo won all kinds of awards, but we’d argue his earlier thrillers were equally well made. Gone Baby Gone was a confident debut and an economical adaptation of Dennis LeHane’s novel. The Town, released in 2010, was a heist thriller that made the most of its Boston setting. One of its key scenes - a bank robbery in which the thieves wear a range of bizarre outfits, including a nun’s habit - is masterfully staged. With Affleck capable of teasing out great performances from his actors and staging effective set-pieces, it’s hardly surprising he’s so heavily involved in making at least one Batman movie for Warner - as well as playing the hero behind the mask.

Anton Corbijn - The American, A Most Wanted Man

The quiet, almost meditative tone of Anton Corbijn’s movies mean they aren’t necessarily to everyone’s taste, but they’re visually arresting and almost seductive in their rhythm and attention to detail. Already a celebrated photographer, Corbijn successfully crossed over into filmmaking with Control, an exquisitely-made drama about Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis. Corbijn took a markedly different direction with The American, a thriller about an ageing contract killer (George Clooney) who hides out in a small Italian town west of Rome. Inevitably, trouble eventually comes calling.

Corbijn’s direction remains gripping because he doesn’t give us huge action scenes to puncture the tension. We can sense the capacity for violence coiled up beneath the hitman’s calm exterior, and Corbijn makes sure we only see rare flashes of that toughness - right up until the superbly-staged climax.

A Most Wanted Man, based on the novel by John le Carre, is a similarly astute study of an isolated yet fascinating character - in this instance, the world-weary German intelligence agent Gunther Bachmann, brilliantly played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Tragically, the film proved to be one of the last before Hoffman’s death in 2014.

Paul Greengrass - Green Zone, Captain Phillips

Mention Greengrass’ name, and the director’s frequent use of handheld cameras might immediately spring to mind. But time and again, Greengrass has proved a master of his own personal approach - you only have to look at the muddled, migraine-inducing films of his imitators to see how good a director Greengrass is. Part of the filmmakers’ visual language rather than a gimmick, Greengrass’ camera placement puts the viewer in the middle of the story, whether it’s an amnesiac agent on the run (his Bourne films) or on a hijacked aircraft (the harrowing United 93). While not a huge hit, Green Zone was an intense and intelligent thriller set in occupied Iraq. The acclaimed Captain Phillips, meanwhile, was a perfect showcase for Greengrass’ ability to fuse realism and suspense; the true story of a merchant vessel hijacked by Somali pirates, it is, to quote Greengrass himself, “a contemporary crime story.”

John Hillcoat - Lawless, Triple 9

We can’t help thinking that, with a better marketing push behind it, Triple 9 could have been a much bigger hit when it appeared in cinemas earlier this year. It has a great cast - Chiwetel Ejiofor, Norman Reedus, Anthony Mackie and Aaron Paul as a group of seasoned thieves, Kate Winslet cast against type as a gangland boss - and its heist plot rattles along like an express train.

Hillcoat seems to have the western genre pulsing through his veins, and he excels at creating worlds that are desolate and all-enveloping, whether his subjects are period pieces (The Proposition, Lawless) or post-apocalyptic dramas (The Road). Triple 9 sees Hillcoat make an urban western that is both classic noir and entirely contemporary; his use of real cops and residents around the film’s Atlanta location give his heightened story a grounding that is believable in the moment. Nowhere is this more in evidence than in the scene in which Casey Affleck’s cop breaches a building while hunkered down behind a bullet-proof shield. Hillcoat places us right there in the scene with Affleck and the cops sneaking into the building behind him; we sense the claustrophobia and vulnerability.

Hillcoat explained to us in February that this sequence wasn’t initially written this way in the original script; it changed when the director and his team discovered how real-world cops protect themselves in real-world situations. In Triple 9, research and great filmmaking combine to make an unforgettably intense thriller.

Jim Mickel - Cold In July

Seemingly inspired by such neo-Noir thrillers as Red Rock West and Blood Simple, 2014‘s Cold In July is a genre gem from director Jim Mickle (Stake Land, We Are What We Are). Michael C Hall plays an ordinary guy in 80s America who shoots an intruder who breaks into his home, and becomes drawn into a moody conspiracy that takes in crooked cops, porn and a private eye (who's also keen pig-rearer) played by Don Johnson. Constantly shifting between tones, Mickel’s thriller refuses to stick to genre expectations. In one scene, after Hall shoots the burglar dead, Mickel’s camera lingers over the protagonist as he cleans up the blood and glass. It’s touches like these that make Cold In July far more than a typical thriller.

Mickel’s teaming up with Sylvester Stallone next; we’re intrigued to see what that partnership produces.

Martin Scorsese - Shutter Island

As a filmmaker, Scorsese needs no introduction. As a director of thrillers, he’s in a class of his own: from Taxi Driver via the febrile remake of Cape Fear to the sorely underrated Bringing Out The Dead, his films are full of suspense and the threat of violence. Shutter Island, based on the Dennis LeHane novel of the same name, saw Scorsese plunge eagerly into neo-noir territory. A murder mystery set in a mental institution on the titular Shutter Island, its atmosphere is thick with menace. Like a combination of Robin Hardy's The Wicker Man and Adrian Lyne’s cult classic Jacob’s Ladder, Shutter Island’s one of those stories where we never know who we can trust - even the protagonist, played by Leonardo DiCaprio.

David Fincher - The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Gone Girl

After the trial by fire that was Alien 3, David Fincher found his footing in the 90s with such hits as Seven and The Game. In an era where thrillers were in much greater abundance, from the middling to the very good, Seven in particular stood out as a genre classic: smartly written, disturbing, repulsive and yet captivating to look at all at once. Fincher’s affinity for weaving atmospheric thrillers continued into the 2010s, first with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, a superb retelling of Stieg Larsson’s book which didn’t quite find the appreciative audience deserved, and Gone Girl, an even better movie which - thankfully - became a hit.

Based on Gillian Flynn’s novel (and adapted by the author herself), Gone Girl is both a gripping thriller and a thoroughly twisted relationship drama. Fincher’s mastery of the genre is all here: his millimetre-perfect composition, seamless touches of CGI and subtle yet effective uses of colour and shadow. While not a straight-up masterpiece like the period thriller Zodiac, Gone Girl is still a glossy, smart and blackly funny yarn in the Hitchcock tradition. If there’s one master of the modern thriller currently working, it has to be Fincher.

See related  John Hillcoat interview: Triple 9, crime, fear of comic geniuses Jim Mickle interview: Cold In July, thrillers, Argento Jeremy Saulnier interview: Green Room, John Carpenter Jeremy Saulnier interview: making Blue Ruin & good thrillers Denis Villeneuve interview: Sicario, Kurosawa, sci-fi, ugly poetry Morten Tyldum interview: The Imitation Game, Cumberbatch, Headhunters Paul Greengrass interview: Captain Phillips & crime stories Movies Feature Ryan Lambie thrillers 15 Jun 2016 - 06:11 Cold In July Triple 9 Shutter Island Gone Girl David Fincher Martin Scorsese John Hillcoat Directors thrillers movies »

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The Theory of Everything helmer set to direct Hatton Garden Heist film

8 June 2016 9:13 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Deadline is reporting that The Theory Of Everything and Man On Wire filmmaker James Marsh has a new directing project lined up. According to the site, Marsh will helm a caper pic about last year's Hatton Garden jewelry heist, and he'll be directing from a script by The Road scribe Joe Penhall. The currently untitled film will be an adaptation of Mark Seal's Vanity Fair article, which... Read More »

- Jesse Giroux

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Triple 9 Blu-ray Clip Gets Dirty with Chiwetel Ejiofor | Exclusive

31 May 2016 12:44 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

After hitting theaters in late February, the action-packed Triple 9 debuts today on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. If you haven't seen this thriller yet, we have an exclusive preview for you to check out, before picking up the movie on Blu-ray, DVD or Digital HD this week. Our exclusive scene features Chiwetel Ejiofor's Michael, explaining to Marcus (Anthony Mackie) and Franco (Clifton Collins Jr.) the details surrounding his first ever kill.

When a veteran cop and his rookie nephew discover a shocking conspiracy that leads dangerously close to home, they'll stop at nothing to get to the truth in Triple 9, an action-packed tale of corruption and betrayal currently available on Digital HD, Blu-ray, DVD and On Demand, from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. Propelled by John Hillcoat's (The Road, The Proposition) ferocious directorial style and a top-notch cast, Triple 9 races through a world »

- MovieWeb

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New to Streaming: ‘Embrace of the Serpent,’ ‘The Mermaid,’ ‘Triple 9,’ and More

20 May 2016 9:54 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Embrace of the Serpent (Ciro Guerra)

With its focus on the effects of exploration by white men on foreign lands, Ciro Guerra’s Oscar-nominated Embrace of the Serpent will inevitably be compared to Werner Herzog’s stories of savage nature, and while Guerra is investigating some of Herzog’s most well trodden themes, the chaos of man exists in the background, while the unspoiled sit front and center here. »

- TFS Staff

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