6.9/10
90
1 user 10 critic

Taking Father Home (2005)

Bei yazi de nanhai (original title)
A 17 year old boy from a village in the Sechuan province leaves for the big city looking for his father, who left 6 years before and has not been heard of since. The fact that his mother ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Xiaopei Liu
Jie Wang
Yun Xu ...
Xu Yun
Edit

Storyline

A 17 year old boy from a village in the Sechuan province leaves for the big city looking for his father, who left 6 years before and has not been heard of since. The fact that his mother still receives money his father does nothing to tame his anger. He his not looking for a warm reunion, it is unconcealed revenge that drives him. Totally lost, he roams the big city with his basket of ducks on his back... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

19 September 2008 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Taking Father Home  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
One of the most remarkable cinema debuts of the decade
12 April 2007 | by See all my reviews

Breathingly remarkably fresh life into a hackneyed-sounding plot, Taking Father Home announces the arrival of a terrific new film-making talent. Filmed for almost nothing with a borrowed camera and featuring a cast almost entirely made up of friends and relatives of Ying (in China, as in Japan and other East Asian countries, surnames come first) and his producer/creative-partner Peng Shan, Taking Father Home is the story of a teenager (Xu Yun) from a remote village who travels to the big city of Zigong with no money and a brace of ducks in a basket on his back. His mission: to find and retrieve his errant father, who walked out on his family six years before.

Yun learns an awful lot very quickly once he arrives in Zigong, as there's no shortage of mentor-figures eager to impart advice. His is a compelling quest, and we're with him every step of the way thanks to Ying's remarkable evocation of Zigong's sights, smells and sounds: if this weren't enough, he somehow manages to express the mood and character of an entire culture with just the simplest of touches and what seems to be the most basic of dialogue. By the end, Taking Father Home has become an utterly engaging emotional experience, and Ying has established himself as one of world cinema's promising young talents. You'll be hearing much more of and from him in years to come.


12 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page