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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 212 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Kathryn Bigelow and cinematic journalism

6 September 2017 1:36 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Henry Bevan on Kathryn Bigelow and cinematic journalism…

Hollywood is obsessed with journalists. From Howard Hawks pictures to most superhero films and romcoms, journalists are often window dressing for plot and snarky dialogue. Journalists themselves are represented as sheriffs or scoundrels, often overly moralistic or morally bankrupt.

For an industry in love with newsroom culture, Hollywood rarely does actual journalism. Unlike the publishing world, Hollywood hasn’t embraced how it can use its various tools to comment on the world. That is until Kathryn Bigelow.

While Bigelow hasn’t made a journalism movie, she has moved away from fun genre pieces like Point Break. Since The Hurt Locker, her three films have been written by journalist-turned-screenwriter Mark Boal, and they are what she calls ‘cinematic journalism’, an oxymoronic term responsible for the controversy that met both Zero Dark Thirty and her latest, Detroit.

By looking at Bigelow’s recent work, »

- Henry Bevan

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Wind River's Jeremy Renner: Being a father is number one. Movies come second

6 September 2017 9:38 AM, PDT | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

Renner, who was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in 'The Hurt Locker', stars with Elizabeth Olsen in Taylor Sheridan's 'Wind River', a murder mystery that touches on male grief »

- James Mottram

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HBO Passes On Kathryn Bigelow’s Somali Community Drama ‘The Recruiters’

2 September 2017 12:51 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

As Peak TV expands beyond what we thought was even possible — what was the last count, more than 420 scripted dramas? — top shelf filmmakers continue to migrate to the medium because networks are voracious for content and willing to throw the kind of money around that movie studios are reluctant to do (which is why they’re falling behind, frankly).

Read More: Kathryn Bigelow & Adam McKay Get Pilot Orders At HBO, Guillermo Del Toro & Kevin Macdonald Head To Amazon

One of those filmmakers is Kathryn Bigelow of “The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty” and this summer’s most recent “Detroit.” Last summer, HBO ordered a pilot of her new drama “Mogadishu, Minnesota,” then known as “The Recruiters.” The show revolved around hidden world of Jihadi recruitment, although it was also described as a family drama about Somalis in Minneapolis.

Continue reading HBO Passes On Kathryn Bigelow’s Somali Community Drama ‘The Recruiters’ at The Playlist. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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‘Mogadishu, Minnesota’ Pilot From K’naan Warsame & Kathryn Bigelow Not Going Forward At HBO

1 September 2017 2:00 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

HBO has opted not to proceed with its drama pilot Mogadishu, Minnesota, written, directed and executive produced by rapper K'naan Warsame and executive produced by Zero Dark Thirty and The Hurt Locker‘s Kathryn Bigelow. “Mogadishu, Minnesota will not be moving forward as a series,” HBO said in a statement to Deadline. “We value the relationship we’ve built working with the talented K’Naan Warsame and hope to have a chance to work with him in the future. Mogadishu, Minneso… »

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'Death in the Terminal' Directors Talk Highlighting Humanity After a Terrorist Attack

29 August 2017 10:43 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

In 2015, amid a global refugee crisis and fears about national security, Israel was experiencing multiple daily domestic attacks. Filmmakers Asaf Sudry and Tali Shemesh decided there was a story to tell in them. Death in the Terminal, running slightly under an hour, is a story about the 18 minutes after a terrorist opened fire in a busy bus terminal on Oct. 18, 2015, in Be'er Sheva, Israel.

Megan Ellison's Annapurna and screenwriter Mark Boal, who teamed up for The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty, served as executive producers on the doc, which is the first for »

- Mia Galuppo

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Detroit review – scenes from a riot revisited

27 August 2017 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Kathryn Bigelow directs John Boyega in a stunningly shot story of disturbing police brutality and civil unrest in 1960s Detroit

Having become the first woman to win the Oscar for best director with The Hurt Locker in 2010, Kathryn Bigelow became the focus of controversy when 2012’s Zero Dark Thirty was accused of somehow endorsing the use of torture in the hunt for Osama bin Laden (Naomi Wolf ludicrously compared Bigelow to Leni Riefenstahl). Torture rears its ugly head again in Detroit, but this time in a context that leaves no room for misinterpretation. Revisiting a shocking “incident” that took place amid five days of rioting in the summer of 1967, Detroit is a provocative period piece made all the more alarming by its stark contemporary relevance. More than 40 people died during the so-called “Detroit rebellion”, most of them African Americans, many shot by the police or national guardsmen. In attempting to »

- Mark Kermode

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‘Detroit’ Review

26 August 2017 3:31 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Review by Matthew Turner

Stars: John Boyega, Will Poulter, Algee Smith, Jacob Latimore, Jason Mitchell, Hannah Murray, Kaitlyn Dever, Jack Reynor, Ben O’Toole | Written by Mark Boal | Directed by Kathryn Bigelow

Kathryn Bigelow’s third collaboration with screenwriter Mark Boal (The Hurt Locker, Zero Dark Thirty) is a powerful, angry drama about racism, police brutality and the complicity of silence. Though it focuses on an incident that took place exactly fifty years ago, it feels horrifyingly relevant today and will leave you shaking with rage.

Detroit begins with white police officers raiding a black, after-hours drinking club in July 1967 and violently mistreating its patrons, an incident that quickly flares up into the Detroit Riots and brings the National Guard to the streets of the city. Meanwhile, at a nearby theatre, aspiring singer Larry (Algee Smith) is devastated when the rioting outside forces the closure of the venue, right before »

- Guest

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Second Opinion – Detroit (2017)

25 August 2017 2:40 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Detroit, 2017.

Directed by Kathryn Bigelow.

Starring John Boyega, Will Poulter, Anthony Mackie, Jack Reynor, Hannah MurrayAlgee Smith, Jacob Latimore, Jason Mitchell, Kaitlyn Dever, Ben O’Toole, Joseph David Jones, Ephraim Sykes, Leon Thomas III, Nathan Davis Jr., Peyton Alex Smith, Malcolm David Kelley, Gbenga Akinnabve, Chris Chalk, Jeremy Strong, Laz Alonzo, Austin Hebert, Miguel Pimentel, Kris Davis, and John Krasinski.

Synopsis:

Amidst the chaos of the Detroit Rebellion, with the city under curfew and as the Michigan National Guard patrolled the streets, three young African American men were murdered at the Algiers Motel.

There are few punches pulled in Kathryn Bigelow’s harrowing retelling of the Detroit riots of 1967. That is, until a white cop unwittingly stumbles upon the beaten, bruised body of Larry Reed-lead singer of pop group “The Dramatics – and with an absolute lack of self-awareness declares, “who could have done this to you.” It’s a rare moment of meat-headed, »

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‘Detroit’ Review: Dir. Kathryn Bigelow (2017)

25 August 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Detroit review: Kathryn Bigelow directs this gritty, uncompromising story based around the true events of the summer of ’67 where three young African American men were murdered at the Algiers Motel in Detroit.

Detroit review by Paul Heath

Detroit review, The Hollywood News – Image: Annapurna

Kathryn Bigelow follows up solid awards-worthy and indeed winning hits The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty with another hard-hitting drama set against the backdrop of 1960s Detroit.

The film takes place in the middle of the 1967 Detroit rebellion, a five-day long public disorder which began in the early hours of Sunday July 23rd, 1967, but more specifically at the events that took place at the Algiers Motel two nights later.

On that fateful evening, Larry Reed (Algee Smith) lead singer of the professional, black R&B group The Dramatics, along with his friend Fred Temple (Jacob Latimore) are involved in an incident which saw his tour bus attacked by rioters. »

- Paul Heath

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Ant-Man And The Wasp: Evangeline Lilly Is Marvel's Unsung Female Co-Lead

22 August 2017 11:30 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

With all of the hype and excitement over Marvel's first female-led superhero film, Captain Marvel, it might be easy to overlook the fact that Carol Danvers isn't the only female headliner in the McU. Hope Van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly), daughter of uber-scientist Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and partner to rehabilitated criminal Scott Lang (Paul Rudd), is the Wasp -- a crucially-important Marvel character who was a founding member of the Avengers (in the comics, of course).

Director Peyton Reed's upcoming Ant-Man and The Wasp is a pure team-up movie, and while it's obviously not led by Van Dyne, she's clearly the co-lead in this film -- it's really unfortunate that this isn't getting more coverage. Lilly has carved out a really interesting career since her breakout role in ABC's Lost TV series; she's appeared in The Hurt Locker (2008), Real Steel (2011), and two of the Hobbit films -- in each »

- David Kozlowski

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Movie Review – Detroit (2017)

22 August 2017 4:10 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Detroit, 2017.

Directed by Kathryn Bigelow.

Starring John Boyega, Will Poulter, Anthony Mackie, Jack Reynor, Hannah MurrayAlgee Smith, Jacob Latimore, Jason Mitchell, Kaitlyn Dever, Ben O’Toole, Joseph David Jones, Ephraim Sykes, Leon Thomas III, Nathan Davis Jr., Peyton Alex Smith, Malcolm David Kelley, Gbenga Akinnabve, Chris Chalk, Jeremy Strong, Laz Alonzo, Austin Hebert, Miguel Pimentel, Kris Davis, and John Krasinski.

Synopsis:

The Detroit Rebellion takes place during the summer of 1967.   While the city is under curfew and the National Guard on the streets, the police raid the Algiers Motel.  Three young black men are murdered and nine more people – seven black men and two white women – are brutally beaten.

When Kathryn Bigelow directs a movie, you know what you’re in for.  In a very good way.  A film that challenges preconceived ideas, one that doesn’t pull any punches and hits you fair and square between the eyes, »

- Freda Cooper

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Jeremy Renner Will Break His Arms If It Lets Him Make a Movie Like ‘Wind River’ — Career Watch

18 August 2017 10:42 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jeremy Renner, who stars in Taylor Sheridan’s indie hit western “Wind River” with fellow-Avenger Elizabeth Olsen.

Bottom Line: Renner has built his movie stardom and used it to smart advantage, ranging from archer Hawkeye in “The Avengers” to throwing banter with Simon Pegg in “Mission: Impossible.” Those movies make it possible for him to be a magician in love with a Frenchwoman (Marion Cotillard) in James Gray’s “The Immigrant,” or the pompadoured Camden, New Jersey Mayor Carmen Polito in David O. Russell’s “American Hustle.”

Career Peaks: Renner had been a working actor for 13 years, supporting himself with construction and house-flipping (and roles as serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and zombie killer in Danny Boyle’s “28 Days Later”) when he broke out at age 37 as the fearless, »

- Anne Thompson

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Jeremy Renner Will Break His Arms If It Lets Him Make a Movie Like ‘Wind River’ — Career Watch

18 August 2017 10:42 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jeremy Renner, who stars in Taylor Sheridan’s indie hit western “Wind River” with fellow-Avenger Elizabeth Olsen.

Bottom Line: Renner has built his movie stardom and used it to smart advantage, ranging from archer Hawkeye in “The Avengers” to throwing banter with Simon Pegg in “Mission: Impossible.” Those movies make it possible for him to be a magician in love with a Frenchwoman (Marion Cotillard) in James Gray’s “The Immigrant,” or the pompadoured Camden, New Jersey Mayor Carmen Polito in David O. Russell’s “American Hustle.”

Career Peaks: Renner had been a working actor for 13 years, supporting himself with construction and house-flipping (and roles as serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and zombie killer in Danny Boyle’s “28 Days Later”) when he broke out at age 37 as the fearless, »

- Anne Thompson

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Kathryn Bigelow on Detroit: ‘There’s a radical desire not to face the reality of race’

17 August 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The latest film from the director of Zero Dark Thirty and The Hurt Locker follows the 1967 police killing of black teenagers amid a racially charged riot. It could be 2017’s most urgent movie

Kathryn Bigelow sits very straight and considers events last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. “It was an atrocity,” she says. “I don’t know where we go from here.” Does the crisis of American racism scare her? She repeats the question back as if peering at it under glass. “Does it scare me? Does it scare me?”

We are in London, a long way from Charlottesville, and a piano tinkles nearby. Bigelow, who is wearing a black top and jeans, is almost 6ft tall, gracefully angular, still the only woman to win an Oscar as best director, for her Iraq war masterpiece The Hurt Locker. The movies she makes – spotted with raw, precision violence – might suggest a certain kind of personality. »

- Danny Leigh

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“Wonder Woman” Is Now the Top Female-Helmed Film at the Domestic Box Office

14 August 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Wonder Woman”: Warner Bros.

Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” can add another accomplishment to its ever-growing list of milestones. As you might have heard, the superheroine pic surpassed the $400 million mark at the domestic global box office last week. As of yesterday, that number climbed to $402.2 million, per Box Office Mojo. In domestic earnings, that makes “Wonder Woman” the highest-earning film from a female director. “Frozen,” co-directed by Jennifer Lee, previously held the title with its $400.7 million domestic take.

Internationally, “Wonder Woman” has earned $797 million so far, trailing “Frozen’s” $1.28 billion. However, the film has surpassed “Kung Fu Panda 2's” $665.7 million global earnings. That means that Jenkins is now the top-grossing solo female director at the international box office, ousting “Kung Fu Panda 2's” Jennifer Yuh Nelson.

All this is in addition to the film’s numerous other achievements. Only a few weeks after its June 2 opening, “Wonder Woman” became the highest-grossing live-action film from a female director. Before that, Jenkins became the record-holder for the highest domestic opening for a woman director — topping the $85.1 million opening of Sam Taylor-Johnson’s “Fifty Shades of Grey” in 2015 and the $69.6 million debut of Catherine Hardwicke’s “Twilight” in 2008.

Ten weeks into its theatrical run, “Wonder Woman” is still in the top 2o domestic films. It was the top-earner during its first two weekends in theaters and placed second in its two subsequent weekends. One of the reasons for its box office longevity? Women and moviegoers over age 50.

Wonder Woman’s” latest win can only bolster Warner Bros.’ Oscar campaign for the Gal Gadot-starrer. The studio has its sights set on “Wonder Woman” becoming the first comic-book film to receive a nod for Best Picture. Warner Bros. is also pushing for Jenkins to become the first director of a comic book movie to receive a nomination. No female directors have been nominated for Best Director since Kathryn Bigelow won for “The Hurt Locker” in 2010. She’s the first and only woman to ever take home the prize.

Wonder Woman” Is Now the Top Female-Helmed Film at the Domestic Box Office was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Exclusive Interview: Jeremy Renner Talks Wind River

7 August 2017 6:48 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Over the past decade, Jeremy Renner has somewhat quietly become one of the most trusted and dependable actors in Hollywood. In addition to his work in critically acclaimed films like The Hurt Locker and Arrival, you can also find him in countless big budget franchises from Mission: Impossible to Bourne to Avengers.

In Wind River, the actor gives one of the best performances of his career. He takes the torrid past of his character Cory Lambert and wears it like a fire burning him from the inside, resulting in heartbreaking and beautifully understated work from the talented Renner.

Last week, we were lucky enough to catch up with him during the film’s press day and had the chance to talk about his experience making the movie, shooting in extremely cold conditions, his upcoming role in Avengers: Infinity War and much more.

Check it out below, and enjoy!

You give »

- Joseph Hernandez

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‘Detroit’: Here’s Why Annapurna Was Smart to Release an Awards Movie in August

7 August 2017 4:48 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Monday-morning quarterbacking is in full effect after Kathryn Bigelow’s “Detroit” opened wide to $7.6 million after a week in limited release. The biggest single target of blame is distributor Annapurna Films’ choice of an August release date for the first film from the distribution arm of Megan Ellison’s high-flying production company (“American Hustle,” “Her,” “The Master”).

Lacking time travel, it’s impossible to predict what the alternative result would have been. But let’s start with the assumption that the team at Annapurna analyzed all options. A case can be made that, faced with a tough film to market, August contained a logic that a fall release did not.

Straight Outta Compton

What Made August Appealing?

Late summer brought both opportunity and precedent. Studio distribution operates under a number of preconceptions, with a heavy reliance on history. Key dates belong to the highest-budget releases that need worldwide success and near-simultaneous release. »

- Tom Brueggemann

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The Top 12 Composers of the 21st Century, From Hans Zimmer to Nick Cave

7 August 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In an age where special effects reign supreme, there’s one aspect of the filmmaking process that hasn’t gone through a radical transformation — music. Some of the best movies in any given year would be sorely lacking without their memorable scores, and this has remained true well into the first two decades of the 21st century.

Read More‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score

Film composers play an integral part in the filmmaking process, and there are a handful whose bodies of work stand out in recent years. Of course, this list of 12 major composers only begins to scratch the surface of the talent out there. There are plenty of other worthy contributors to the medium who didn’t make the cut — Danny Elfman and John Williams, we’re looking at you — but rest assured that this top dozen represent the cream of the crop.

Hans Zimmer »

- Gabrielle Kiss

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No Matter How Well Made, Bigelow Depiction of Detroit Rebellion Both Condescending and Self-Serving

6 August 2017 9:10 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Detroit movie street riot scene: The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty director Kathryn Bigelow tackles the 1967 Detroit riots in “horribly real” and “deeply self-serving” 2017 release marketed as a “dramatic thriller.” Kathryn Bigelow's 'Detroit' movie: Horribly real semidocumentary or self-serving Hollywood depiction of 1967 Detroit Rebellion? In the city of Detroit, from July 23 through July 27 of 1967, the people rebelled against the conditions of their existence. Some call this the 1967 Detroit Riot; it's also known as the 12th Street Riot and the 1967 Detroit Rebellion. I prefer the latter. During the rebellion, 43 people died – 33 of whom were black, 10 were white. Twenty-four of the black victims were shot by police officers and National Guardsmen, while six were shot by store owners or security guards. Three of those killings are the subject of Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow, her itinerant The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty scenario writer Mark Boal (who also wrote Paul Haggis' In the Valley of Elah), and »

- Tim Cogshell

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How ‘Detroit’ Could Help Create Real Change, Through Legislation

4 August 2017 3:50 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Kathryn Bigelow’s “Detroit” is not an easy movie to watch. An hour is devoted to the brutal depiction of the 1967 Algiers Motel incident, in which racist police officers murdered several innocent black men — all while protests against police brutality dominated the streets. However, the film’s unflinching portrait of racism has a real-time resonance that could generate new conversations about the struggle to address these problems today.

However, as “Detroit” opens wide in theaters across the nation, it has already shown potential to impact something even bigger than a post-screening debate: legislation.

On July 20, Michigan’s longtime U.S. Representative John Conyers Jr. screened the movie in Washington D.C. for an event that commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Detroit uprising.(He’s also a character in the film, played by Laz Alonzo.) In 2001, Conyers introduced a bill to establish the the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans, »

- Eric Kohn

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 212 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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