The Mist
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

FAQ for
The Mist (2007) More at IMDbPro »

The content of this page was created directly by users and has not been screened or verified by IMDb staff.
Visit our FAQ Help to learn more

FAQ Contents

A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags are used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for The Mist can be found here.

The Mist is a 1980 novella by American horror fiction writer Stephen King, featured in the King collection Skeleton Crew (1985). The story was adapted for the movie by director and producer Frank Darabont.

What is 'The Mist' about?

The story is told after the fact by movie poster illustrator David Drayton (Thomas Jane). Following a violent thunderstorm in which his house loses power and trees smash through his studio window and his boathouse, he and his eight-year-old son Billy (Nathan Gamble), along with neighbor Brent Norton (Andre Braugher), head into town for supplies. While they are in the store with dozens of other shoppers also looking for supplies, a siren goes off and a strange white mist settles over the town. Soon, the shoppers learn that the mist contains dangerous, alien creatures and that they must band together to keep themselves safe...until it becomes apparent that there may be a greater danger inside the store than out.

Although not directly stated in the movie, it is implied that the creatures entered through an inter-dimensional rift as a result of Project Arrowhead, a secret scientific project being carried out on a nearby military base. An early draft of the script written by Frank Darabont included a prologue set in the base's laboratory, providing a reasonably good idea of what the Arrowhead Project was supposed to have been and what went wrong. In the prologue, a number of civilian scientists, computer technicians, and Army personnel gather around a large object which resembles an old-fashioned diving helmet: a metal tank with thick glass windows. One of the scientists expresses some concern about running an experiment in the middle of a thunderstorm. His superior tells him to relax and orders that the device be turned on. When the machine is activated, a small point of white light (described as looking like a flashlight shining through a keyhole) appears inside the tank. Moments later, however, lightning strikes the base's electrical generator. The point of light begins to get larger and brighter. One of the scientists calls for the machine to be turned off, but a technician tells him "we can't; we're drawing [the power] right out of the sky." The scientists stand helplessly by as the portal inside the tank gets wider and wider and a white mist begins to fill the tank. Something "slithery" is then glimpsed moving inside the tank. A colonel asks the scientists how thick the glass is in the tank's windows. The scientist, sounding none too confident, tells him that it can withstand up to forty times the pressure of our own atmosphere. Apparently that isn't strong enough, because the windows of the tank begin to crack and finally shatter outwards, releasing the mist into the laboratory.

We don't see what happens to them. They walk out into the mist, along with the Biker (Brian Libby) who tied the rope to his waist and went out with them to get the shotgun. All the focus is on the inside of the store, feeding the rope through the door. The biker gets killed moments later, which leads us to believe that whatever got him also killed Brent Norton and the others. Later, when some of the characters are discussing escaping, they refer to 'ending up like Norton and his group'. So the people in the film believe he was killed. Norton does not reappear again in the film.

Mrs. Carmody (Marcia Gay Harden) believes the mist and the creatures to be a punishment from God. When the large insect lands on Mrs Carmody's abdomen and flies away without stinging her, she believes she has stood the test of God's Judgment. However, it could simply be the same principle as with a wasp -- she stood completely still and did not anger it, so the insect did not feel the need to sting her. A second possibility is that the insect landed on her clothing and did not sense her living flesh. A third possibility is that the insect simply did not like her smell. Who knows what motivates giant insects, especially supernatural ones.

No, that was the Military Police officer who was seen coming into the grocery store to tell Private Jessup (Sam Witwer) and the two other soldiers that all leaves were canceled. He mentions that he is going to check the pharmacy and tells the soldiers to meet him at his jeep. Moments later, the mist clouds the town.

What is Silvadene?

One of the medications they obtain from the next door pharmacy is Silvadene (silver sulfadiazine). Silvadene is a topical antibiotic used on burns.

Although Stephen King appears in cameos in some of his movies, he does not have a cameo in The Mist. However, the pharmacy next door to the market is named 'King's Pharmacy', which may be considered a cameo of sorts.

How does the movie end?

When dawn comes and the creatures are less active, David, Billy, Amanda (Laurie Holden), Ollie (Toby Jones), Irene (Frances Sternhagen), Dan (Jeffrey DeMunn), and three others decide to make a run for it. Mrs Carmody and her 'congregation' attempt to stop them, demanding they turn over Billy for their expiating sacrifice, until Ollie finally shoots her. The nine escape out into the parking lot, all running towards David's Land Cruiser, but only David, Billy, Amanda, Irene, and Dan make it. David drives first to his house looking for his wife, only to find her webbed to the side of the house. They head south, hoping to get out of the mist but finding only death, carnage, and more creatures, until the Cruiser runs out of gas and they run out of hope. Hearing nothing but the roars of monsters all around them, they settle on the only avenue open to them...suicide. Checking Ollie's pistol, David finds that there are four bullets left. From outside the Cruiser, four shots can be heard. Inside the Cruiser, Billy, Amanda, Irene, and Dan are dead. David exits the Cruiser and calls to the monsters to come and get him. Suddenly, he hears the sound of an engine in the distance. When it gets closer, he sees that it's a military tank followed by a long convoy of tanks, evacuation trucks loaded with people, and foot soldiers with flame throwers. As the mist begins to clear and David watches the vehicles pass, he falls to his knees in tears, screaming, 'They're dead! For what?'. Two soldiers watch him, unaware of what David has just done.

"The Host of Seraphim" by Dead Can Dance.

The book's ending is more ambiguous than the movie. In the story, only four people make it out to the car alive: David, Billy, Amanda, and Irene. After leaving the supermarket, David attempts to return home but large trees have blocked the driveway. David convinces himself that if his wife were quick enough, she could have secured herself in the house, but her fate is ultimately unknown. After driving a while, they stop at an abandoned Howard Johnson motel for the night, David listens to a portable radio and thinks he hears a single word emanating from a station in Hartford. He estimates how much gas he has left to make it there but also realizess the danger of being outside the car to siphon fuel. He leaves his journal on a counter in HoJo's.

Yes, it's true. This version is called the Director's Choice Version and features a three minute long explanation by director Frank Darabont in which he explains why this black and white is version is his preferred version of the movie. Besides this color issue some minor changes can be found between both versions and a detailed comparison can be seen here.

"The Mist" was also adapted into a radio play/drama called "The Mist in 3-D Sound", originally released on cassette tape in 1984 and later released on CD. William Sadler, who played Jim in the movie, is the voice of David Drayton. The radio play actually has a different and more ambiguous ending than the movie or the novella. After the large creature passes overhead, Irene (only known as Miss Reppler in the play) asks David to turn on the radio which he gets nothing but static. In contrast to the novella where David gets upset at himself for not thinking of trying the radio, he just says "All right" and turns it on. Irene also makes a comment about an Exit 13 where there used to be a Howard Johnson's, but they do not stop as they do in the novella where David is writing the story. The play then cuts a different scene where Amanda and David overhear someone say "Hartford" over the radio, Amanda and David confirm that that's what they heard, and the play ends with David's Scout passing by.

Page last updated by bj_kuehl, 1 year ago
Top 5 Contributors: briangcb, !!!deleted!!! (1271173), Moosie, Field78, rick3197


Related Links

Plot summary Plot synopsis Parents Guide
Trivia Quotes Goofs
Soundtrack listing Crazy credits Alternate versions
Movie connections User reviews Main details