5.8/10
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Nine (2009)

Trailer
2:35 | Trailer

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ON DISC
Famous film director Guido Contini struggles to find harmony in his professional and personal lives, as he engages in dramatic relationships with his wife, his mistress, his muse, his agent, and his mother.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
2,829 ( 38)
Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 56 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Sandro Dori ...
Studio Superintendent
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Ricky Tognazzi ...
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Roberto Nobile ...
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Romina Carancini ...
Production Assistant / Female Dancer
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Storyline

Arrogant, self-centered movie director Guido Contini finds himself struggling to find meaning, purpose, and a script for his latest film endeavor. With only a week left before shooting begins, he desperately searches for answers and inspiration from his wife, his mistress, his muse, and his mother. As his chaotic profession steadily destroys his personal life, Guido must find a balance between creating art and succumbing to its obsessive demands. Written by The Massie Twins

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

This Holiday Season, Be Italian

Genres:

Drama | Musical | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual content and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

25 December 2009 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Untitled Rob Marshall Project  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$80,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£44,443 (UK) (18 December 2009)

Gross:

$19,673,424 (USA) (5 March 2010)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Katie Holmes was keen on Luisa's part. She auditioned, but Rob Marshall felt she was not the better choice, choosing Marion Cotillard instead. See more »

Quotes

Liliane La Fleur: [From trailer] Directing a movie is a very overrated job, we all know it. You just have to say yes or no. What else do you do? Nothing. "Maestro, should this be red?" Yes. "Green?" No. "More extras?" Yes. "More lipstick?" No. Yes. No. Yes. No. That's directing.
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Connections

Featured in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #20.160 (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Casa Sulitaria
Written by Roberto Murolo (as R. Murolo) and Nino Oliviero (as N. Oliviero)
Performed by Roberto Murolo
Courtesy of Iris Music
(c) 1952 by Edizioni Leonardi Srl - Milano
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Nine is not your everyday musical
26 December 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

What do I know about musicals? From my limited experience of musicals, ("Singing in the Rain," "Guys and Dolls," "The Blues Brothers" {yes, it is considered a musical comedy} and "Legally Blonde the Musical") here is the basic linear format as I see they are written in — opening dialogue, singing, more dialogue, more singing, even more dialogue and then a grand finale. Then for a week after that, you have the songs stuck in your head. Director Rob Marshall chose not to follow the old standby format through to the end. His actions placed "Nine" in a different category from the standard musical.

The movie focuses on Guido Contini (Daniel Day-Lewis) as a famous movie director in Italy in 1965. He is having troubles developing his next movie. More so, he hasn't written a script. Even more so, he is having trouble even coming up with an idea for his movie. He had successful movies in the years past but now we are watching him struggle after a few major flops.

In his journey to make his next movie, he is having marital problems along with mistress problems. Add in Freudian issues with his deceased mother and his working relationship with his costume designer and his muse. Don't forget to include yet another potential affair outside of the one he is having with his mistress, plus there's the memory of an erotic lady on a beach from his youth (that's seven women total for those of you who are keeping score at home).

You know what is going to make this movie stand out from the crowd? It is the realistic singing by the actors. They are actors first and singers second (except for maybe Fergie who plays the erotic lady from Guido's youth but she didn't say much in the film, come to think of it I think she only sang). Since I don't know much about musicals and even less about how to sing properly, I could grasp the singing. The tunes they sang aren't the kind you are going to be singing on the way home because a lot of the songs were simply narrated lines being sung. When a character wanted to express his or her thoughts, they would sing their lines. Maybe that's what they do in all musicals — like I said my experience here is limited.

The women. Oh, the women. They all performed wonderfully, and I don't just mean the singing. The female cast includes his wife (Marion Cotillard), his mistress (Penelope Cruz), his costume designer (Judi Dench), the woman from his childhood (Fergie), an American fashion designer (Kate Hudson), his muse (Nicole Kidman) and his mother (Sophia Loren). They brought emotion and life to the story through their singing and their lustful yet sensual moves. I would also like to note, as a guy, the women were the reason why I kept my attention focused for almost 2 hours. I don't even watch a football game this intensely.

Should you see this movie? Yes. But, don't go in expecting a musical you can sing along with or a movie that will leave you feeling giddy with love. It dealt with some very real issues about infidelity. I will say this, though, after seeing this movie I do know a little more about musicals. And, that's a good thing.


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