Antichrist (2009) - News Poster

(2009)

News

Zentropa Sidelines Co-Founder Peter Aalbæk Jensen Amid Harassment Allegations

Zentropa Sidelines Co-Founder Peter Aalbæk Jensen Amid Harassment Allegations
Leading Scandinavian production company Zentropa is sidelining co-founder and former CEO Peter Aalbæk Jensen following a report alleging sexual misconduct, harassment and bullying in the workplace.

Aalbæk Jensen, who founded the company with director Lars von Trier, has been accused of sexual misconduct by several women in a story published by the Danish newspaper Politiken. Nine women – including Meta Louise Foldager Sørensen, who worked at Zentropa from 2006 to 2010 and produced von Trier’s “Antichrist” and “Melancholia,” and Anna Mette Lundtofte, a writer and journalist – described a toxic and sexually charged work environment at the company. Labor inspectors are currently investigating the allegations.

In an internal memo sent out to employees Wednesday and first published in Deadline, Zentropa said Aalbæk Jensen would no longer have an “influence on the daily leadership of the company [and] will not partake in any management meetings.” Nor will he be allowed to speak on behalf of the company.

The memo, which
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lars von Trier Producer Investigated Over Sexual Harassment Claims

Lars von Trier Producer Investigated Over Sexual Harassment Claims
Danish authorities are investigating claims by nine women of sexual harassment and workplace bullying by Peter Aalbaek Jensen, the co-founder of Lars von Trier's production company Zentropa and a towering figure in European cinema.

The women, including former Zentropa producer Meta Louise Foldager Sorensen, who worked on von Trier's films Antichrist (2009) and Melancholia (2011), made their claims public in Danish newspaper Politiken. They allege that “sexual harassment have long been part of the work environment for many employees” at Zentropa and that Jensen was “one of the main figures perpetuating the system of degradation.”

Among the allegations, former employees...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Lars von Trier’s Production Company Accused of Allowing Sexual Harassment and Bullying

Lars von Trier’s Production Company Accused of Allowing Sexual Harassment and Bullying
Zentropa, the leading Scandinavia production company founded by Lars von Trier and Peter Aalbæk Jensen, has been accused by nine Danish women of fostering an environment where sexual harassment, degradation and bullying are rife.

A report in the Danish newspaper Politiken published allegations of a toxic workplace environment by women including Meta Louise Foldager Sørensen, who worked at Zentropa from 2006 to 2010 and produced von Trier’s “Antichrist” and “Melancholia,” and Anna Mette Lundtofte, a writer and journalist who worked at Zentropa for three years before publishing the book “Zentropia” in 2013.

“I think that everyone who has been employed by Zentropa has been exposed to or witnessed certain things – both sexually charged acts and bullying or ‘teasing.’ All of this was an ingrained part of the culture,” said Foldager Sørensen, who went on to found Sam Productions with Soren Sveistrup (“The Killing”) and Adam Price (“Borgen”).

Lundtofte said she “saw women being degraded” at Zentropa.

“According to the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Danish Authorities To Investigate Sexual Harassment Claims Against Zentropa Co-Founder Peter Aalbæk Jensen

Danish Authorities To Investigate Sexual Harassment Claims Against Zentropa Co-Founder Peter Aalbæk Jensen
Danish authorities are investigating claims of sexual harassment and workplace bullying by Peter Aalbæk Jensen, co-founder of Lars Von Trier's production company Zentropa. Deadline has confirmed that the country's Working Environment Authority, known locally as Arbejdstilsynet, is to launch a review after nine women, including Antichrist and Melancholia producer Meta Louise Foldager Sørensen made allegations against Aalbæk Jensen. The women gave detailed testimonials to…
See full article at Deadline »

Nine Women Allege ‘Sexual Harassment, Degradation and Bullying’ at Zentropa, Lars von Trier’s Production Company

  • Indiewire
Nine Women Allege ‘Sexual Harassment, Degradation and Bullying’ at Zentropa, Lars von Trier’s Production Company
Nine women have come forward to speak about their experiences with “sexual harassment, degradation and bullying” at Zentropa, the Danish production company co-founded by Lars von Trier. Many of the accusations center around Peter Aalbæk Jensen, the company’s other founder, who is “highlighted by several sources one of the main figures perpetuating the system of degradation.”

Read More:Björk Stands By Sexual Harassment Claims After Lars von Trier Denial, Reveals More ‘Paralyzing’ Abuse

These women offered their accounts to Politiken, one of the oldest and most widely read newspapers in Denmark. One of them, Meta Louise Foldager Sørensen, worked on such films as “Antichrist” and “Melancholia” and claims that “I think that everyone who has been employed by Zentropa has been exposed to or witnessed certain things. Both sexually charged acts and bullying or ‘teasing’. All of this was an ingrained part of the culture.”

Former employees claim that
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The House That Jack Built’ First Look: Lars von Trier Turns Matt Dillon Into a Serial Killer

‘The House That Jack Built’ First Look: Lars von Trier Turns Matt Dillon Into a Serial Killer
It’s never too early to start looking forward to some of the hottest titles of 2018, especially since the year in cinema is winding down with only a few movies left to world premiere (chief among them “Star Wars: The Last Jedi and Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread”). One movie that might just be 2018’s most controversial is “The House That Jack Built,” the latest offering from Lars von Trier. The Danish director is famous for making headlines, whether it’s for getting banned from Cannes or for making a sexually explicit drama like “Nymphomaniac,” and he’ll have no problem doing so with a movie about a serial killer.

Read More:News Film TV Awards Toolkit More Search Lars von Trier Wants You to Know ‘The House That Jack Built’ Will Be His Most Brutal Film Ever

The House That Jack Built” stars Matt Dillon as the titular murderer.
See full article at Indiewire »

A ‘mother!’ of a Vicious Commentary

There’s no easy way to describe Darren Aronofsky’s latest film, the appropriately titled mother! (appropriate once the pieces start crashing into place). It’s oppressively heavy on symbolism, it’s profoundly unsettling, it’s guaranteed to piss off practically audience member in one way or another. To be blunt: it’s pure Aronofsky and, if its reception from both the Venice and Toronto Film Festivals to the scathingly polarizing reaction its had in its first weekend of release are any indicator, it’s going to cement itself with ease as one of the most thoroughly debated experiences of the 21st century. Whether that’s a good thing or a bad thing is up to you.

In a beautiful countryside manor amidst lush fields and the warmest sunsets (all beautifully brought to life by regular Aronofsky Dp Matthew Libatique and production designer Philip Messina) lives a couple – given no names in the story,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Tiff 2017. Correspondences #5

  • MUBI
Dear Danny and Kelley,The Rider sounds lovely, and I’m happy to hear Chloé Zhao has built on the melancholy promise of her first film, Songs My Brother Taught Me. Artists with a gift for empathy create anticipation for new works. Artists whose single stylistic tool is shock, on the other hand, cause only dread. So it goes with mother!, Darren Aronofsky’s latest suite of seizures and my noisiest, least rewarding experience at Tiff so far. Genius is like fire in that it is born from what it burns, says Malraux, so this allegory on the malefic artistic process opens with the subtlety and maidenly restraint expected from the maker of Requiem for a Dream: a full frontal glimpse of an incinerated woman, her blistering skin suggesting a melting gold effigy. The drama proper belongs to another wax dummy, an unnamed young wife played by Jennifer Lawrence
See full article at MUBI »

L'Etrange 2017: Watch The Festival's Opening Credits

L'Etrange Festival kicked off this past Wednesday in Paris and will continue on until September 17th. The festival's opening credits have been made available for everyone to have a look at. Familiar names appear through the digital mashup. What fun.  Can Evrenol's Housewife just had its world premiere there and received acclalim from French director Xavier Gens. Word from the festival is that Gens found Housewife to be a "a very crazy affair" and later posted on Facebook, "And amazing actress too ! Bravo Clementine Poidatz you rock ! Not an easy part and you embrace it at 1000%. Make me think to Charlotte Gainsbourg in Antichrist. It's a perfect mix of influence from Argento to Von Trier. Bravo!" Still to appear at the festival are...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Mother! review

Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem star in Darren Aronofsky's Mother! We delve into a very strange metaphysical horror...

Sometimes it isn’t what a film’s about or its style that’s surprising, but who’s in it and where it came from. Were Mother! an obscure genre piece from Europe or South Korea, its weird, wild excesses would probably be welcomed without the bat of an eyelid. But this is a relatively mainstream piece distributed by a major American studio (Paramount) and starring some of the biggest stars currently working in Hollywood: Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem as two partners trapped in an increasingly hellish relationship. All of this might explain why the movie's been greeted with a mixture of critical adulation and horrified disbelief since its festival debut.

Then again, it's arguable that director Darren Aronofsky’s been making off-beat horror movies off and on since his
See full article at Den of Geek »

Mother! review – no gob left unsmacked in Jennifer Lawrence's anxiety dream of horror and dismay

Lawrence and Javier Bardem play a husband and wife whose isolated house is invaded by another married couple in Darren Aronofsky’s black-comic nightmare

It’s a powerful enough word at the best of times, but the exclamation mark gives it that edge of delirium and melodrama and despair – just the way Norman Bates yells it at the end of Psycho. Or maybe we’re supposed to hear a second, brutal two-syllable word immediately afterwards. Darren Aronofsky’s toweringly outrageous film leaves no gob unsmacked. It is an event-movie detonation, a phantasmagorical horror and black-comic nightmare that jams the narcosis needle right into your abdomen. Mother! escalates the anxiety and ups the ante of dismay with every scene, every act, every trimester, taking us in short order from Wtf to Wtaf to Swtaf and beyond.

It’s a very bad dream of very bad things: influenced perhaps by Polanski’s
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-ray Review – Klown (2010)

Klown, 2010.

Directed by Mikkel Nørgaard.

Starring Frank Hvam, Casper Christensen, Marcuz Jess Petersen, Mia Lyhne, Iben Hjejle, and Niels Weyde.

Synopsis:

In order to prove to his pregnant girlfriend that he is father material, Frank brings his 12-year-old nephew along on a weekend canoeing trip with his friend Casper, although the trip is really a front for a weekend of debauchery.

There is always a danger with comedy in a foreign language that the humour won’t translate as well, especially when you have to read subtitles and, as we all know thanks to social media and the backlashes it can cause, crude humour in written form doesn’t always have the desired effect. Luckily Danish comedy Klown doesn’t rely too much on the written (or spoken) word for most of its humour, most of which is very juvenile (but still extremely funny) and means you’ll probably have
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

IFC moves into Lars von Trier's 'House That Jack Built'

  • ScreenDaily
IFC moves into Lars von Trier's 'House That Jack Built'
Us outfit strikes Cannes deal for upcoming serial killer feature.

As Cannes Marche winds down, IFC has acquired Us rights for Lars von Trier’s The House That Jack Built.

TrustNordisk’s director of international sales and marketing Susan Wendt negotiated the deal with Arianna Bocco from Sundance Selects/IFC Films.

The film, set in the 1970s United States, stars Matt Dillon as a serial killer. The cast also includes Bruno Ganz, Uma Thurman, Riley Keough, Siobhan Fallon Hogan and Sofie Grabol.

Jonathan Sehring and Lisa Schwartz, co-presidents of IFC Films/Sundance Selects said: “Lars von Trier is an unparalleled cinematic provocateur and one of the world’s great auteurs. It’s great to be working with old friends and colleagues such as Lars, Peter Aalbaek Jensen and the entire Trust team – we are anticipating audiences will see a Matt Dillon they have never dreamed of before”.

Wendt added: “IFC did a great job on Antichrist and their
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes: IFC Films Picks Up Lars von Trier's Serial Killer Drama 'The House That Jack Built'

Cannes: IFC Films Picks Up Lars von Trier's Serial Killer Drama 'The House That Jack Built'
IFC Films has acquired U.S. rights to Lars von Trier's serial killer drama The House That Jack Built.

It marks the second teaming of IFC and the controversial helmer, after the specialty label released von Trier's Antichrist.

Set in the U.S. in the 1970s, the film follows the titular protagonist (Matt Dillon) from his point of view through five murders. Jack views each murder as an artwork in itself, even though his dysfunction gives him problems in the outside world. Despite the fact that the final and inevitable police intervention is drawing ever near, which both provokes and puts pressure...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

IFC Nabs U.S. Rights to Lars Von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

IFC Nabs U.S. Rights to Lars Von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’
IFC Films has acquired U.S. rights to Lars Von Trier’s anticipated thriller “The House That Jack Built” which toplines Matt Dillon and Uma Thurman.

Repped by TrustNordisk, “The House That Jack Built” also stars Bruno Ganz, Riley Keough and Siobhan Fallon Hogan.

The movie is being produced by Louise Vesth for Zentropa Group, in co-production with Film i Väst, Copenhagen Film Fund, Slot Machine.

IFC Films previously handled Von Trier’s “Antichrist” which world premiered at Cannes in 2009.

Set in the 1970s, the film centers on a serial killer, Jack, whose psychopathy is explored through five incidents told through his own eyes. He views each murder as an artwork in itself, even though his dysfunction gives him problems in the outside world.

Lars von Trier is an unparalleled cinematic provocateur and one of the world’s great auteurs. It’s great to be working with old friends and colleagues such as Lars,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

IFC Films Acquires Lars von Trier’s Serial Killer Drama ‘The House That Jack Built’

IFC Films Acquires Lars von Trier’s Serial Killer Drama ‘The House That Jack Built’
IFC Films has acquired the U.S. rights to Lars von Trier’s “The House That Jack Built,” a drama about a serial killer. The film stars Matt Dillon, Bruno Ganz, Uma Thurman, Riley Keough and Siobhan Fallon Hogan.

Read More: Lars von Trier Wants You to Know ‘The House That Jack Built’ Will Be His Most Brutal Film Ever

Set in the U.S. in the 1970s, “The House That Jack Built” follows Jack (Dillon) through a series of murders that define his development as a serial killer. “We experience the story from Jack’s point of view,” IFC said in a statement. “He views each murder as an artwork in itself, even though his dysfunction gives him problems in the outside world.” The film marks von Trier’s first feature since 2013’s “Nymphomaniac.”

Lars von Trier is an unparalleled cinematic provocateur and one of the world’s great auteurs,
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Donnie Darko,’ ‘Antichrist,’ ‘The Prestige,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Antichrist (Lars von Trier)

Like the majority of Lars von Trier films, from the first moments of Antichrist, one will be able to discern if it’s an experience they want to proceed with. For those will to endure its specific unpleasantness, there’s a poetic, affecting exploration of despair at its center. Chaos reigns, indeed. – Jordan R.

Where to Stream: FilmStruck

Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly)

Last year marked
See full article at The Film Stage »

Review: ‘Super Dark Times’ Is An Unnerving Cross Between ‘Stand By Me’ and ‘Donnie Darko’ — Tribeca 2017

Review: ‘Super Dark Times’ Is An Unnerving Cross Between ‘Stand By Me’ and ‘Donnie Darko’ — Tribeca 2017
The ominous prologue of Kevin Phillips’ “Super Dark Times” arrives like a shiver, and that chill lingers until the bitter end, continuing to sink into your skin even as the rest of the film begins to melt into the atmosphere. A slow-burn high school thriller that’s like a tortured cross between “Stand By Me” and “Donnie Darko” (with a bit of Dostoyevskian madness thrown in there for good measure, Phillips’ feature-length debut begins by welcoming us to a grey Hudson Valley town that’s lost in the barren phantom zone between fall and winter.

The place looks practically post-apocalyptic, the shattered window of a classroom evoking “Children of Men.” But it’s not the end of the world, just a petrified buck who’s gotten himself into a spot of trouble. Some cops stand over the animal as it lies dying on the floor between the desks, the men
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Wish List: 50 Films That Have a Serious Shot at the 2017 Festival Lineup

  • Indiewire
Cannes Wish List: 50 Films That Have a Serious Shot at the 2017 Festival Lineup
In order to make accurate predictions about the potential Cannes Film Festival lineup, it’s first important to explore which films definitely won’t make the cut. The glamorous French gathering is notorious for waiting until the last minute before locking in every slot for its Official Selection. That includes competition titles, out of competition titles, a small midnight section and the Un Certain Regard sidebar. Cannes announces the bulk of its selections in Paris on April 13, but until then, there are plenty of ways to make educated guesses. Much of the reporting surrounding the upcoming festival selection is simply lists of films expected to come out this year. However, certain movies are definitely not going to the festival for various reasons.

That’s why our own list of potentials doesn’t include “Image Et Parole,” Jean-Luc Godard’s followup to “Goodbye to Language,” which sales agent Wild Bunch now anticipates as a 2018 title.
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites