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The Tribeca Chanel Women’s Filmmaker Program Announces This Year’s Participants

Marianna Amelinckx is among this year’s emerging filmmakers: Through Her Lens

The five participants of this year’s Through Her Lens: The Tribeca Chanel Women’s Filmmaker Program have been announced. Launched to provide industry support, funding, and other resources to new and emerging U.S.-based female writers and directors of short-form narrative films, the three-day mentorship initiative is now in its third year. This year’s crop of filmmakers includes Marianna Amelinckx, whose short film “Salta” premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, and 2016 Independent Spirit Award nominee Myna Joseph (“The Mend”).

The emerging filmmakers will “take part in master classes, one-on-one mentorship, and peer-to-peer sessions,” a press release details. “At the end of the program, each of the five filmmakers will pitch her project to a jury of industry experts. One filmmaker will be awarded full financing to produce her short film, along with support of Tribeca Studios to make the project, and the four other projects will each be awarded grant funds to continue the development of their films.”

The five talents will gather in New York City from October 17–19 for an intense, intimate program focusing primarily on “script-to-screen development, casting, finding collaborators, and working with music composers, costume designers, and producers.” They’ll be improving their pitching skills and meeting with prominent women in the industry. Each filmmaker will get the chance to work with writing mentors during the summer.

Master class advisors include “A United Kingdom” director Amma Asante, “Twilight” actor Dakota Fanning, and “Hidden Figures” producer Donna Gigliotti. “Queen of Katwe” helmer Mira Nair and Oscar-winning actor Rachel Weisz are among the jurors. Mentors include writer-executive producer Ilene Chaiken (“The Handmaid’s Tale”), writer Leslie Dixon (“Hairspray”), and producer Celine Rattray (“American Honey”), with writing mentors such as writer-director Robin Swicord (“The Jane Austen Book Club”) and producer Effie T. Brown (“Dear White People”).

“We’re thrilled to give such a talented new class of filmmakers the opportunity to participate in Through Her Lens,” said Amy Hobby, Executive Director of Tribeca Film Institute. “The program, and advancing the careers of female filmmakers in general, is an important part of our year-round work elevating diverse storytellers in order to advance racial, gender, and economic equity.”

Check out all of the filmmakers selected to participate, their projects, and their bios below.

Vuela — Marianne Amelinckx (Writer/Director). Venezuela could have been one of the richest countries in the modern world, but ineffective government policies and corruption have made the country one of the most dangerous places to live. Vuela (Fly) tells the story of a chance encounter between Luisa and Monica just before they take off to different countries and leave everything behind them, including the opportunity to get to know each other.

Marianne Amelinckx is a Venezuelan writer/director whose passion for storytelling led her to write and direct Salta, a very personal short film that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2017. Vuela is the second short film of the trilogy: Salta, Vuela, Corre. She is also currently working on 39 bedrooms, a personal blog that might turn into her first feature film.

Wingmen — Nicole Emanuele (Writer/Director). Sarah’s bachelorette party is all cigarettes and penis shots, until she and her best friend Marie get the call to report for active duty the next day. They’ve been training for years to be deployed by the U.S. Navy, so they’ve got this, right?

Nicole Emanuele’s short film Love, Gina (2017) played at Cinequest and Rooftop Film Festival and was featured on The Playlist. She produced Not Waving But Drowning (2012) with Adam Driver, Lilli Reinhart, Megan Guinan, and Vanessa Ray and is currently a development executive at YouTube Red overseeing series and films including Step Up: High Water and Doug Liman’s Impulse.

No Fault — Myna Joseph (Writer/Director). Following a near-fatal car accident, Lu wrestles with creeping invisibility as she approaches the second half of her life. On this long winter day, she finds her physical identity fractured, ignored, misunderstood, and judged — but with wry humor and stubborn resilience, she’s determined to be seen.

Myna Joseph’s short film Man screened at Cannes in Directors’ Fortnight, Sundance, SXSW, and New Directors/New Films Festival. She was nominated for a 2016 Independent Spirit Award for Best First Screenplay for The Mend, which was also nominated for a Gotham Award. Myna attended the Sundance Directors’ and Screenwriters’ Labs with her feature Charlotte XVI and is a graduate of Wellesley College and Columbia University’s M.F.A film program.

Suicide By Sunlight — Nikyatu Jusu (Writer/Director). Valentina, a day-walking Black vampire protected from the sun by her melanin, finds it difficult to suppress her bloodlust when a new woman is brought around her estranged twin daughters.

Nikyatu Jusu is an award-winning Sierra Leonean-American filmmaker. Her screenplay Free the Town participated in the Sundance Institute’s inaugural Diverse Writers Workshop and was selected for both the 2013 Durban Film Mart and Film Independent’s Fast Track. Her short film, Flowers, won the HBO short film award and is her third film acquired by HBO.

Girl Wants Magic — written by Anna Zlokovic (Writer/Director). Manny, an outcast and bullied high schooler, finds her only friend in music. When her teacher, Mr. Hornby, is possessed by a violent, alien insect, Manny is forced to fight her biggest demon yet and discover her magic within.

Anna is an award-winning writer/director based in Los Angeles and an alumna of the USC Film & TV Production program. Her films and music videos have screened internationally at festivals including SXSW, Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Fantasia Int’l Film Festival, and Oberhausen Int’l Film Festival. She is a founding member of the Aporkalypse filmmaking collective.

The Tribeca Chanel Women’s Filmmaker Program Announces This Year’s Participants was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Spotlight: Maria Bello's Charity Work

Maria Bello is an actress known for her roles on ER, Coyote Ugly, The Jane Austen Book Club, Thank You for Smoking, A History of Violence, and The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor.

She is known for her work with the Save Darfur Coalition.

Charities & foundations supported

Maria Bello has supported the following charities:

Artists for Peace and JusticeDeclare YourselfGive LoveJoyful Heart FoundationKivaSave the ChildrenSomaly Mam FoundationUS Doctors for AfricaWe Advance Read more about Maria Bello's charity work and events. Related articles Buy George Clooney's Gift Bag For DarfurHollywood Urges Us To VoteCelebrity Endorsement Pulls Young VotersFergie Designs Star For Charity AuctionStars Challenge You To Make A Difference With Small Things

Explore celebrities by social reach, cause, location, field and more with Insider Access →

Copyright © 2017 Look To The Stars. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this via email or in your news reader,
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Bryan Cranston’s ‘Wakefield’ gets a UK trailer

Have you ever just wanted to walk away from it all? And how would your friends and family cope in your absence if you did? Those questions and more are asked in the strikingly original Wakefield, debuting at this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival before arriving on digital platforms on July 28th and DVD from July 31st courtesy of Signature Entertainment.

Successful suburbanite Howard Wakefield (Bryan Cranston; Breaking Bad, Trumbo) takes a surprising detour from family life when it all starts to get too much: He vanishes without a trace. Hidden in the attic of his carriage house garage, surviving by scavenging at night, Howard secretly observes the lives of his wife, his children and his neighbours as they learn to live with his unexplained disappearance. But has he left his family, or has he left himself?

A fraught meditation on marriage and identity, Wakefield features a tour de
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Watch the UK trailer for Wakefield, starring Bryan Cranston

Signature Entertainment have debuted the UK trailer for the upcoming Bryan Cranton-led drama Wakefield. The film, which debuted at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival back in September of last year, arrives on the home formats in the UK in July. Watch the Wakefield UK Trailer below.

Wakefield UK trailer lands online ahead of a direct-to-digital/ DVD release.

Have you ever just wanted to walk away from it all? And how would your friends and family cope in your absence if you did? Those questions and more are asked in the strikingly original Wakefield, debuting at this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival before arriving on digital platforms on July 28th and DVD from July 31st courtesy of Signature Entertainment.

Successful suburbanite Howard Wakefield (Bryan Cranston; Breaking Bad, Trumbo) takes a surprising detour from family life when it all starts to get too much: He vanishes without a trace. Hidden in the attic of his carriage house garage, surviving by scavenging at night, Howard secretly observes the lives of his wife, his children and his neighbours as they learn to live with his unexplained disappearance. But has he left his family, or has he left himself?

A fraught meditation on marriage and identity, Wakefield features a tour de force performance from a never better Cranston in a film that won wide praise following its debut last year at the Toronto International Film Festival. Based on a short story from the legendary American novelist E.L Doctorow and brought to the screen by acclaimed writer/director Robin Swicord (The Jane Austen Book Club, Memoirs Of A Geisha), Wakefield features supporting performances from Jennifer Garner (Dallas Buyer’s Club, Juno), Beverley D’Angelo (Entourage, Cougar Town) and Jason O’Mara (The Good Wife, Marvel’s Agents Of Shield), but make no mistake – this is Cranston’s film, featuring a truly towering performance from one of the most important actors working in film today.

We reviewed the film at Tiff last year, and you can check it out right here.

The post Watch the UK trailer for Wakefield, starring Bryan Cranston appeared first on The Hollywood News.
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Bonnie Curtis, Julie Lynn sign overall deal with Skydance

The deal covers film and television projects through Mockingbird Pictures banner.

Skydance has entered into a multi-year overall deal for feature films and television with producers Bonnie Curtis and Julie Lynn of Mockingbird Pictures.

The company has several projects in development with Curtis (pictured) and Lynn, including the upcoming AMC television series Dietland.

Curtis and Lynn first partnered at Mockingbird Pictures after producing Albert Nobbs in 2012. The pair have produced seven films together, including Arie Posin’s The Face Of Love, Victor Levin’s 5 To 7, and Rodrigo Garcia’s Last Days In The Desert.

This year the duo has released Life, The Sweet Life, and Wakefield. Next on their slate is Marti Noxon’s To The Bone, which will premiere on Netflix in July.

Curtis’ industry start was as Steven Spielberg’s assistant; the beginning of a 15-year professional relationship with the director. After working on Jurassic Park and Schindler’s List, Curtis transitioned
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Skydance Media Inks Overall Deal With Producers Bonnie Curtis, Julie Lynn

Skydance Media has formed a multi-year overall deal for both feature films and television with producers Bonnie Curtis and Julie Lynn of Mockingbird Pictures, Variety has learned. The studio currently has multiple projects in development with Curtis and Lynn, including the upcoming AMC television series “Dietland.”

“Bonnie and Julie are exceptional people and incredible producers whose boundless energy, incomparable work ethic, and collective eye for mining and cultivating creative material are second to none,” said Dana Goldberg, chief creative officer of Skydance Media. “I have known and admired both of them for a long time and l am thrilled that they have become a part of the Skydance family. I look forward to the number of exciting film and television projects in our collective future.”

Curtis and Lynn first partnered under the Mockingbird Pictures banner after producing the Academy Award-nominated “Albert Nobbs” in 2012. Sine then, Lynn and Curtis have gone on to produce seven films together, including
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Wakefield movie review: man of the house (emeritus)

MaryAnn’s quick take… An appalling elevation of toxic masculinity to something poignant, radical, and heroic. As unpleasant and as passive-aggressive as its horrid protagonist. I’m “biast” (pro): love the cast

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

I wish I could figure out just what the hell writer-director Robin Swicord (The Jane Austen Book Club) thinks she is saying with the appalling Wakefield, a movie as unpleasant and as passive-aggressive as its horrid protagonist. Because all it looks and feels like is an elevation of toxic masculinity — of emotional withdrawal, delusions about one’s own rationality, pretensions about one’s boldness, and disdain for women, among other nasty things — to a level meant to be poignant, radical, and heroic all at once. And it’s nothing of the sort.

Rather than face a momentary embarrassment,
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I'll link you again in 25 years...

Cartoon Brew utterly savage (but 100% correct) on the Emoji Movie trailer

La Review of Books on Netflix's Sense8 as metaphor for Netflix is. (I have no idea

why a book site is  reviewing this but the piece is absolutely terrific)

La Times talks to Robin Swicord, only now with a second feature (Wakefield) long after the success of The Jane Austen Book Club. Her debut was profitable (always Hollywood's end goal) but Hollywood wouldn't hire her to direct? We've heard this story all too often!

Screen Daily in terrible terrible news they're still not going to let the once genius but totally played out Terminator franchise die and Arnold Schwarzenegger and James Cameron plan to be involved in the next one. Doesn't anyone in Hollywood want to do something original even more? It's not like Cameron couldn't get funding for literally Anything he wanted to do. (sigh)

Film School Rejects
See full article at FilmExperience »

“Wakefield” Writer-Director Robin Swicord on How She Got the Movie Made and Breaking into Directing

Robin Swicord on the set of “Wakefield”: Gilles Mingasson.

Robin Swicord’s many writing credits span from ’90s family favorite “Matilda” to Oscar-nominated drama “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” She made her directorial feature debut with 2007’s “The Jane Austen Book Club.” Swicord’s new film, “Wakefield,” intimately follows a suburban man’s decision to withdraw from his own life.

I spoke with Swicord about “Wakefield’s” unconventional protagonist, the difficulties of launching a career in directing, and her commitment to expanding creative communities.

Wakefield” opens May 19.

This interview has been edited. It was transcribed by Kelsey Moore.

W&H: I watched the film yesterday, and I found it so interesting and so different from most things that I have seen previously. I felt that it was basically a monologue. Am I right in feeling that way?

Rs: Well, there is a monologue aspect to it because it’s how we see into the internal life of this character, Howard Wakefield. We have no way of knowing what he’s thinking unless he tells us. So much of the time, we essentially are privy to his thoughts. There are shifts within this. At the beginning, he’s trying to tell you a story about a thing that happened to him. Later, the tense shifts, and we’re in his head as things are happening.

At one point, I pulled out all of the voiceover and looked at how long it was, because I was going to have to create a script that the film’s star, Bryan Cranston, could then record. It was interesting to see how much of the film you could understand just from what he says.

W&H: It was surprising to see just how little other characters speak. I counted, and I found that the first 47 minutes of the film consists of Wakefield’s internal monologue. That’s quite a challenge for a director, to put a movie like this together. What where the biggest challenges for you in terms of making a film that essentially focuses on a single voice?

Rs: There were certainly a lot of risks involved in taking this on. I wanted to do something that was hard, and I loved E.L. Doctorow’s short story. One of the things I’ve always heard about movies is that they aren’t internal, yet so many movies that I’ve watched have felt internal.

So, one of the things I wanted to do was sort of push my own boundaries and see if I could make a film that was subjective and from one person’s point of view. On top of that, this person would be changing — both perceptibly and imperceptibly — as the story proceeded.

The first challenge was to just have faith that this was a worthy experiment, and that I would figure out how to do it. The other thing that absolutely had to happen was that I had to have an actor that could hold the center of the screen like Bryan Cranston does.

The casting part was the scariest part for me, particularly because initial conversations with indie films always start the same way: Who can we get that would help us get our financing?

Bryan was first one my list, but at the time that we started having casting conversations, he was mostly known for television; he had been in several different series, including the now very important “Breaking Bad,” which had not yet reached Europe at this time. So, he didn’t have a lot of international sales value, which is how indie films get financed. That’s sort of the backup plan, knowing that this or that film may always be made whole by its sale to Denmark.

We had to sort of sit it out a bit until “Breaking Bad” was released in Europe. Then his foreign profile began to rise. He was cast as Dalton Trumbo in my friend Jay Roach’s “Trumbo,” and, having read the script, I figured that he would get an Oscar nomination, which he did.

So, again, it was an act of faith. I just felt that if I had the right actor, he was worth waiting for and fighting for. We got him, and the truth is that it could have gone another way, but Bryan is an unusually responsible actor. He is a man of his word, and a year and a half before we shot, he said, “I will shoot this movie with you.” I did not know him yet, and I had some anxiety about it coming true. It did because he held to his word.

W&H: And now he’s a big, big star.

Rs: He is a big, big star, and he should be. He’s really an amazing actor, director, writer, and producer. There’s nothing that he can’t do. He’s a person with many gifts and a huge heart. Every time I meet someone new that knows Bryan, they tell me some story about one of his wonderful acts of generosity.

W&H: When we are introduced to Bryan Cranston’s character, he is really not a nice guy. As the film evolves, you see him sort of the shed the world’s masculinity and the toxicity of everyday life, and he kind of goes back to a feral character in some ways. Talk a bit about the evolution of this man from a “master of the universe” to a stripped down state.

Rs: Right. He isn’t that different from the rest of us in the sense that the world has asked a certain role of him. He is enacting that role, so, to his mind, he’s not a bad person. He’s a wage earner who commutes to the city, and he supports his family in the suburbs. He’s rarely there; their lives continue often without him. When he steps out of his life, he discovers how lonely he feels due to his choice to be that guy.

One of the of the first things to happen to him is the opportunity to reconnect and watch his kids. He’s not speaking to or interacting with them, but they are adolescents, so, as he points out to us, they don’t pay much attention to him anyway.

He is also in a marriage that he doesn’t understand. It got off on the wrong foot from the very beginning because of an action that he takes. He remembers it, and at first he finds some kind of amusement in it; he is still in a state of trying to bolster himself by these exploits. As time goes on, he begins to see his wife as less of an object.

There is something in the culture about the possession of women. He is very focused on possessing her — even watching her from afar becomes a way of possessing her. At some point, he realizes that he doesn’t possess her, and he never has. It’s a slow evolution.

It’s funny along the way because it’s meant to be funny, but also because Bryan is very funny. He has that background in comedy. At times, he reminded me of Charlie Chaplin. I wrote a couple of shots that are homages that that because, in some sense, he became like the Little Tramp.

He really went after finding out what it was to abandon a family, and he had his own reasons for doing that. He took a very deep emotional dive into the logical reasons for someone to step out and leave the family behind. I think that Bryan’s own humanity helped infuse the character in a way that keeps us connected to Howard Wakefield, even when we want to say, “I would never do that.”

W&H: Do you feel that your role as a writer helped you direct this piece?

Rs: It’s hard to imagine a director I would have given it to if I hadn’t been the director.

W&H: When did you decide direct as well as write? Was that something you knew early on but never got the opportunity? What was the transition like for you?

Rs: I have always wanted to direct. I made short films in the South during my 20s, and this was back when you had to drive your negative from Northwest Florida to Atlanta to get it processed in a lab. It was a cumbersome thing, because I had to scrounge together the short ends of 16 mm film and so forth. It’s much easier now.

But, the obstacles I faced are similar to those which women still face today. The first obstacle is that people don’t think of directors as being women. When I would turn a script in and the studio would ask who should direct, I would say that I would like to direct it. This was always met with a kind of embarrassed silence, and then they would go on and hire someone else.

In many cases, I was able to get a female director hired — just not me. I thought that the problem had to do with my short films, as they are outdated and don’t really show what I can do. So, I made a new short film called “The Red Coat.” It was the closing film at the Aspen Shortsfest. I thought that, with this substantial piece of work and all of these other screen credits, it would easier to attach myself to a project. But that did not prove to be the case for a very long time.

Eventually producer John Calley made a deal for me to write and direct “The Jane Austen Book Club.” But even though it came out with moderate success, no subsequent jobs came my way. It was still very difficult to attach myself as the director of one of my own screenplays.

After trying for a few years, I found “Wakefield.” I knew this was a film of the right size where I could somehow put together the financing. But, again, the casting was key.

W&H: Do you think that — having first made a film about women and this one is about a man — you will now be looked at differently? Do you feel that this film and its male-centric role is something that you can get a better calling card with?

Rs: I really have no idea. I had some expectations after “The Jane Austen Book Club” came out because I was surrounded by examples of directors coming out of Sundance with offers to direct franchises. We always see people taking chances on young male talent.

I thought that all you needed to do was exhibit competence, and that if people want to be in business with you, they’ll get in business with you. I found that people didn’t want to be in business with me.

W&H: Do you feel any sense of change now?

Rs: I don’t know. I mean, I’m not holding a lot of expectations. I want audiences to find “Wakefield.” I made it for audiences to see. I want them to have a big emotional experience like the way I did when I was writing the screenplay.

But, I don’t necessarily think it’ll be a game-changer in terms of people going, “Oh my God. Even though she’s female, she can direct a movie!” They’ve had that opportunity before.

W&H: Why do you think there’s still this fundamental thing in people’s brains where they associate “director” with “man?” What do you think that’s about?

Rs: I don’t think this is just in Hollywood. It’s a systemic problem everywhere. Women are not viewed as serious contenders for important jobs. Every woman has to kind of invent her own path, because the doors haven’t really opened.

W&H: You’re also a member of the writer’s branch of the Board of Governors for the Academy. Talk a bit about your leadership in that and what you think about its efforts to include more women and people of color.

Rs: This has been happening for some years now. Dawn Hudson — who transformed Film Independent into the powerhouse for indie filmmakers — believes that the industry should be more inclusive. When she became the Academy’s CEO, she found that a number of others on the Board of Governors, shared that view — she wouldn’t have been hired otherwise.

So, given that we now had the leadership, we spent some time rewriting bylaws and taking care of things that should probably have been done previously. We redid our committee structure and other things that are really boring but necessary.

The Academy has been engaged in that process. At the same time, there’s been a constant discussion about how the Academy can help the entertainment business become a more inclusive environment. We decided that every branch would start to look for people who had been overlooked.

It’s important to know that every branch has its own standards for membership. One of things that we found in the writer’s branch is that we had to look at people who were women and minorities and realize that they may not have the three to four writing credits we normally look for — because it’s very hard for them to even get one. We have to instead look at the quality of their work and take a chance.

Now we have a system that wasn’t necessarily in place before. If you haven’t worked at least three times in 30 years, your membership may be up for review. This system allows the Academy to take more risks and admit those who may have not had that many opportunities.

W&H: Right, and you’ve made a huge change.

Rs: We have. It’s been a worldwide concerted effort. Over the last three years, we’ve let in enough people that now we have to turn outwards to industry and ask, “Where are the others?” Because if you don’t employ them, we can’t let them into the Academy.

One of these efforts is the Academy Gold Program, which was just announced this year. It is an inclusion program spearheaded by Fox Searchlight president Nancy Utley. It is essentially creating a hub for internships through the Academy; 19 companies have already signed on, and we supply them with interns. We won’t see that change next year, or even three to four years from now — but ten years from now we’ll see a big difference because of this internship program.

W&H: One of the things that keeps going through my head is the “lost generation” of women — those female directors and creatives who just didn’t have opportunities — and how we can prevent that from continuing to happen. Do you have any thoughts on that?

Rs: Well, there’s still time for some of the so-called “lost women.” The hardest thing to overcome is that internal feeling of impossibility.

It’s kind of the feeling I’ve had. My husband has started watching “The Handmaid’s Tale,” and I’ve watched a few episodes. I recently told him that I wouldn’t be watching anymore of this, because I feel that the message thus far is that resistance is futile.

I don’t think that resistance is futile. In fact, I think that it’s the only thing that has gotten women where they are.

So, in terms of a “lost generation,” there is still time for many people to put their work out there and not take no for an answer. But, women do have to help each other in order to make that come true.

W&H: I think you should give “The Handmaid’s Tale” another chance because the resistance is coming.

I saw that you’re involved with Hedgebrook and their screenwriter’s lab over there. Tell us a bit about why you wanted to do that.

Rs: Hedgebrook is an interesting community. They serve a fairly small group of people every year; there are only six cabins that people stay in. But, they serve a very important group of women. For one thing, half or more of the people who receive residencies are women of color.

They have a mission to create the room of one’s one, to make a space, to caretake. They’ve been doing it for about 40 years, but they had never really welcomed screenwriters. They were interested in doing their first masterclass on screenwriting, and asked me to teach it. I did because I thought that their project was really extraordinary.

Since then, we’ve created a screenwriting workshop, which is an inclusion workshop. We’ve only done it for two years, and every year we have to get the money together. So far, it’s come from a group of women called the Woolf Pack, which came together out of the Humanitas programs under Cathleen Young.

To me, the program isn’t just about serving the six residents. It is about creating a sort of movable program that can travel to the cities in order to do some of the workshops they do at Hedgebrook, but on a much larger scale.

Hedgebrook is also starting a documentary program. Holly Morris, who did “The Babushkas of Chernobyl” is helping with its design and recruitment.

She and I have put our heads together, and we’re going to try to expand this mission to cities like New York, Chicago, Atlanta, and Los Angeles — wherever there is a creative community of women who don’t have the same access to these kinds of collaborative workshops.

W&H: I’m very interested in continuing to build the pipeline and creating opportunities for inclusion and new voices. Okay, last question: What do you want people to think about as they leave the theater after seeing “Wakefield?”

Rs: I want them to think about their own lives.

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Wakefield” Writer-Director Robin Swicord on How She Got the Movie Made and Breaking into Directing was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Will Alien: Covenant Revive The Ailing Franchise Or Do More Damage? -- The Weekend Warrior

  • LRM Online
Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, and to paraphrase those renowned seventies scholars the Brady Bunch, “When it’s time to change then it’s time to change.”

While I’ve tried my hardest to slowly sneak those changes in, it’s gotten to the point where we’ll need to do something more drastic if the few of you reading the Weekend Warrior on a weekly basis actually want it to remain coming to you on a weekly basis. Because of that, we’re going to try something different by not throwing in as much independent limited releases for those checking the column out, and making the column a little more focused at least for the time being. (I’m probably going to move reviews for my Top Picks over to my blog, which is easy enough to
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Trailer Watch: Bryan Cranston Hides from His Family in Robin Swicord’s “Wakefield”

Wakefield

“Suburban life. So much is the same week after week. Who hasn’t had the impulse to put their life on hold for a moment? Just vanish completely,” says Howard Wakefield (Bryan Cranston) in the first trailer for Robin Swicord’s “Wakefield.” The businessman takes his daydreaming one huge step forward by deciding not to go home to his wife (Jennifer Garner) and teenage daughters after a late night at work. Instead, he retreats to the attic of the family’s garage. He camps there, watching his loved ones — and the police — deal with the aftermath of his unexplained absence.

“I never left my family,” Howard claims. “I left myself. Unshackled, I’ll become the Howard Wakefield I was meant to be.”

An adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’s 2008 short story of the same name, “Wakefield” marks Swicord’s second feature credit as a director. She previously helmed 2007’s “The Jane Austen Book Club.” She penned both screenplays. In 2009 Swicord received an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” Her other writing credits include “Little Women,” “Memoirs of a Geisha,” and “The Promise.” The latter, a love triangle set during the final days of the Ottoman Empire, hits theaters tomorrow, April 21.

When we asked Swicord what she’d like people to think about after watching “Wakefield,” she said, “I’d love for people to find themselves crowded with a variety of competing thoughts, along the lines of, ‘Where will this story go from here?’; ‘What was going on, on her side of the story?’; ‘Could I ever forgive him?’; ‘Could I ever do what he did? And what do I think would happen if I did?’; ‘Could this man have changed as much, without doing something as drastic?’; and ‘What does it take to reclaim yourself? What has to be sacrificed?’”

Wakefield” made its world premiere at Telluride last year and hits theaters May 19.

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Trailer Watch: Bryan Cranston Hides from His Family in Robin Swicord’s “Wakefield” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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‘Wakefield’ First Trailer: Bryan Cranston Goes Into Seclusion in New Drama

  • Indiewire
‘Wakefield’ First Trailer: Bryan Cranston Goes Into Seclusion in New Drama
Wakefield” had its world premiere at the 2016 Telluride Film Festival, followed by a screening in the Special Presentations section at Tiff. Now, IFC Films has released the first trailer for the drama starring Bryan Cranston and Jennifer Garner, ahead of the film’s theatrical debut next moth.

Read More: ‘Wakefield’ Review: Bryan Cranston Is An Asshole For The Ages — Telluride

Based on E.L. Doctorow’s 2008 short story of the same name, “Wakefield” follows Howard Wakefield (Cranston), a Manhattan lawyer with a beautiful family and a home in the suburbs. After suffering a nervous breakdown, Wakefield leaves his wife (Garner) and two daughter and goes into hiding his attic. The film is written and helmed by Robin Swicord, the director of “The Jane Austen Book Club” and co-writer of the Academy Award winning film”The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” The cast also includes Jason O’Mara and Beverly D’Angelo.
See full article at Indiewire »

Robin Swicord’s “Wakefield” Acquired by IFC Films

Wakefield

Love “Breaking Bad” and miss watching Bryan Cranston scale new heights of self-destructive behavior? You’re in luck. Robin Swicord’s “Wakefield” has found a home. A press release announced that IFC Films has acquired the drama, which sees Cranston playing a father and husband who abandons his family and hides in their attic. Walter White may be gone, but Cranston has found another fictional family to wreak havoc on.

An adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’s short story, “Wakefield” follows “successful suburbanite commuter Howard Wakefield (Cranston), [who] takes a perverse detour from family life: He vanishes without a trace. Hidden in the attic of his carriage house garage, surviving by scavenging at night, Howard secretly observes the lives of his wife (Jennifer Garner) and children and neighbors,” the film’s official synopsis details. “‘Wakefield’ becomes a fraught meditation on marriage and identity, as Howard slowly realizes that he has not in fact left his family; he has left himself.”

Swicord made her feature directorial debut with 2007’s “The Jane Austen Book Club,” a romantic drama starring Emily Blunt and Maria Bello about — as its title suggests — a book club that discusses the works of Jane Austen. Her screenwriting credits include “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “Little Women,” and “Matilda.” In 2009 Swicord received an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.”

When we asked Swicord what she’d like people to think about after watching “Wakefield,” she said, “I’d love for people to find themselves crowded with a variety of competing thoughts, along the lines of, ‘Where will this story go from here?’; ‘What was going on, on her side of the story?’; ‘Could I ever forgive him?’; ‘Could I ever do what he did? And what do I think would happen if I did?’; ‘Could this man have changed as much, without doing something as drastic?’; and ‘What does it take to reclaim yourself? What has to be sacrificed?’”

The film’s theatrical run will begin May 19 in New York. You can catch “Wakefield” on VOD May 26.

Robin Swicord’s “Wakefield” Acquired by IFC Films was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

How Bryan Cranston and Director Robin Swicord Embraced the ‘Strange’ and Unlikable for Character Study ‘Wakefield’

How Bryan Cranston and Director Robin Swicord Embraced the ‘Strange’ and Unlikable for Character Study ‘Wakefield’
Like so many indie movies, “Wakefield” was something of a miracle for writer-director Robin Swicord. It’s been more than eight years since “The Jane Austen Book Club” (an average statistic for women directors); in the meantime she received an Oscar nomination for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (she shared story by credit with Eric Roth). But for “Wakefield” to happen required infinite patience and no small amount of luck.

Swicord sent “Wakefield” over the transom to Telluride co-director Tom Luddy. “He loves the interesting movie,” she said. “He has broad taste, a love for European movies. I felt when I was cutting ‘Wakefield,’ ‘We are making an interesting, strange movie.'”

Read More: Telluride and Tiff’s Oscar Tea Leaves: How Two Key Festivals Could Predict This Year’s Winners

When she arrived to world premiere the film on Friday for her first Telluride, Swicord had just finished
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

How Bryan Cranston and Director Robin Swicord Embraced the ‘Strange’ and Unlikable for Character Study ‘Wakefield’

  • Indiewire
How Bryan Cranston and Director Robin Swicord Embraced the ‘Strange’ and Unlikable for Character Study ‘Wakefield’
Like so many indie movies, “Wakefield” was something of a miracle for writer-director Robin Swicord. It’s been more than eight years since “The Jane Austen Book Club” (an average statistic for women directors); in the meantime she received an Oscar nomination for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (she shared story by credit with Eric Roth). But for “Wakefield” to happen required infinite patience and no small amount of luck.

Swicord sent “Wakefield” over the transom to Telluride co-director Tom Luddy. “He loves the interesting movie,” she said. “He has broad taste, a love for European movies. I felt when I was cutting ‘Wakefield,’ ‘We are making an interesting, strange movie.'”

Read More: Telluride and Tiff’s Oscar Tea Leaves: How Two Key Festivals Could Predict This Year’s Winners

When she arrived to world premiere the film on Friday for her first Telluride, Swicord had just finished
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Wakefield’ Review: Bryan Cranston Is An Asshole For The Ages — Telluride

  • Indiewire
‘Wakefield’ Review: Bryan Cranston Is An Asshole For The Ages — Telluride
“What is so sacrosanct about a marriage and a family that you should have to live in it day after day?” That’s a hell of a thing to hear from a guy like Howard Wakefield (Bryan Cranston), a wealthy Westchester lawyer with a beautiful wife (Jennifer Garner) two healthy teenage daughters, and a house so big that someone could rather comfortably reside in its two-story garage.

But Howard — whose sniveling inner monologue seeps into almost every moment of the jagged, acidic comedy that shares his name — isn’t your typical bored white-collar suburbanite. He’s not Lester Burnham, numb with ennui. He’s not Brad Adamson in “Little Children,” desperate to feel another woman’s touch. He’s just an asshole, one of the most selfish characters you’ll ever see on a movie screen, and it’s a strange pleasure to watch him self-destruct when he realizes that
See full article at Indiewire »

Bryan Cranston Is Unrecognizable In First Wakefield Photos As Jennifer Garner Joins Cast

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We’ve seen Bryan Cranston teeter on the edge of insanity in Breaking Bad, but the first slew of set photos for Wakefield showcase the Emmy award-winning actor like we’ve never seen him before.

Hunched over on a park bench clutching some food, Cranston’s groggy appearance reflects the nature of his character in the drama. You see, he’s set to play a successful and married lawyer living in New York. With seemingly everything in place for a happy life, his life is suddenly sent into a tail-spin when his wife discovers he’s been having an affair with a young woman, triggering a nervous breakdown that condemns him to live in his attic for several long and gruelling months.

After being shunned from his family home, Cranston’s lead decides to live in secrecy in the attic, emerging only at night in order to rummage for food.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Jennifer Garner to star opposite Bryan Cranston in drama Wakefield

  • JoBlo
Variety has learned that Jennifer Garner has been cast as Bryan Cranston's wife in Wakefield, a big screen take on author E.L. Doctorow's short story adaptation of the original "Wakefield" story by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Production is already underway on the quirky drama, with Robin Swicord (The Jane Austen Book Club) directing from her own script. The film will see Cranston... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Jennifer Garner Joins Bryan Cranston’s ‘Wakefield’ (Exclusive)

Jennifer Garner Joins Bryan Cranston’s ‘Wakefield’ (Exclusive)
Jennifer Garner is starring opposite Bryan Cranston as his wife in the drama “Wakefield” with Robin Swicord directing from her own script.

Production has started in Los Angeles. Bonnie Curtis and Julie Lynn are producing through their Mockingbird Pictures banner with Broadway producers Wendy Federman and Carl Moellenberg.

The film is based on a short story of the same name by E.L. Doctorow — which is a retelling of a story by Nathaniel Hawthorne, also called “Wakefield” — about a man who unexpectedly leaves his wife for an extended period of time.

Cranston revealed the project during a November interview on “The Howard Stern Radio Show,” explaining that he will play a married Manhattan lawyer who sees a raccoon in the attic of his home and winds up staying in the attic for several months due to a nervous breakdown. He also said his character will become romantically involved with a younger
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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