Officer Murray of the Berry Street Station, is a big-hearted, well-thought-of patrolman in love with his work and his simple home. He incurs the enmity of Joe Slattery, a perverted, ... See full summary »

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Cast

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...
Officer Murray
...
Mrs. Murray
Capitola Holmes ...
Little Helen Murray
Timmy Sheehan ...
Little Timothy Murray
Mac Barnes ...
The Chief of Police
Douglas Lawrence ...
Joe Slattery - Reporter
Vera Hamilton ...
Mrs. Williams - Candy Factory Forewoman
Margaret Melville ...
Mrs. Slattery - the Old Apple Woman
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Storyline

Officer Murray of the Berry Street Station, is a big-hearted, well-thought-of patrolman in love with his work and his simple home. He incurs the enmity of Joe Slattery, a perverted, prevaricating reporter on the Evening Times. Slattery watches Murray and secures his revenge when the officer is bested by a crowd of young hoodlums whom he is trying to discipline. In the mix-up, Murray loses his star. Slattery gets his paper to print a sensational story which results in Murray being discharged from the force. Slattery's poor old mother, an apple peddler, who has often been befriended by Murray, induces him to secure a job in a nearby candy factory. Murray does so and is soon beloved by all the employees. One day an explosion occurs in the factory and within a few moments the old rattle trap building is one mass of flames. A panic ensues among the employees, who are mostly women and children. Murray takes in the situation, and, with an exhibition of bravery, carries the employees to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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1 August 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The fire and all the scenes are very well done
13 January 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A melodrama that stirs much sympathy for its hero in its early scenes and that has a good, though very formal, climax; but that loses its effectiveness at the close through a hundred feet of sentimental insincerity. A reporter has a grudge against Officer Murray and lies so about him in the paper that he gets him fired for cowardice. In the end, Murray saves the reporter's old mother from a burning factory. He is finally pulled from the roof just before it falls, by a crane worked by men building a steel house near by. The fire and all the scenes are very well done. It is a good offering, although it has a very poor ending. - The Moving Picture World, August 17, 1912


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