This was originally a book, made into a ten part television series broadcast on PBS by economists Milton and Rose Friedman that advocates free market principles. The thrust of the series is... See full summary »
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1980  

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This was originally a book, made into a ten part television series broadcast on PBS by economists Milton and Rose Friedman that advocates free market principles. The thrust of the series is that the free market works best for all members of society. It provides examples of how the free market engenders prosperity and maintains that it can solve problems where other approaches have failed. The general format is Dr Friedman visiting and narrating a number of success and failure stories in history, which Dr Friedman attributes to capitalism or the lack thereof. The series is highly informative and interesting as Dr Friedman describes the various government interventions and "solutions" that generally do far more harm than good.

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1980 (USA)  »

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Referenced in Jeopardy!: Episode #26.32 (2009) See more »

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Excellent but biased
17 November 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This series really is formatted into two parts; introductory explanation of economic principles and debate. As you would expect from a Nobel laureate, Friedman's explanations on topics such as comparative advantage and inflation are very informative and surprisingly entertaining.

For all the charm of his explanations, the series loses much of its luster during the debates. The people who were invited to debate with Friedman are definitely an interesting bunch (e.g. a young Donald Rumsfield) but the debaters never come to any sort of consensus and Friedman gets away with surprisingly flimsy arguments (e.g. "it's amazing what you can get statistics to say"). Aside from this, there is also the problem of Friedman incorporating some of his more controversial views as if they are undisputed facts.

Still, this series of videos is excellent, and if you know just a tiny bit about economics it's a safe bet that you can tell where Milton's excursions into the normative begin. At the very least, it's nice to see the passion Friedman has for economics.


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