7.0/10
27,647
104 user 169 critic

Son of Rambow (2007)

PG-13 | | Action, Adventure, Comedy | 23 May 2008 (USA)
During a long English summer in the early 1980s, two schoolboys from differing backgrounds set out to make a film inspired by First Blood (1982).

Director:

Writer:

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
ON DISC
3 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Mary Proudfoot (as Jessica Stevenson)
Anna Wing ...
...
Tallulah Evans ...
Emilie Chesnais ...
French Teacher (as Emile Chesnais)
...
Geography Teacher
Finola McMahon ...
Rachel Mureatroyd ...
Taylor Richardson ...
Peter Robinson ...
Charlie Thrift ...
...
Sam Kubrick-Finney ...
Danny
Edit

Storyline

SON OF RAMBOW is the name of the home movie made by two little boys with a big video camera and even bigger ambitions. Set on a long English summer in the early '80s, SON OF RAMBOW is a comedy about friendship, faith and the tough business of growing up. We see the story through the eyes of Will, the eldest son of a fatherless Plymouth Brethren family. The Brethren regard themselves as God's 'chosen ones' and their strict moral code means that Will has never been allowed to mix with the other 'worldlies,' listen to music or watch TV, until he finds himself caught up in the extraordinary world of Lee Carter, the school terror and maker of bizarre home movies. Carter exposes Will to a pirate copy of Rambo: First Blood and from that moment Will's mind is blown wide open and he's easily convinced to be the stuntman in Lee Carters' diabolical home movie. Will's imaginative little brain is not only given chance to flourish in the world of film making, but is also very handy when it comes to... Written by Hammer & Tongs

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Make Believe. Not War.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence and reckless behavior | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

| | |

Language:

|

Release Date:

23 May 2008 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El hijo de Rambow  »

Box Office

Budget:

£4,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£897,089 (UK) (4 April 2008)

Gross:

$1,784,769 (USA) (8 August 2008)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Between his audition and the start of the shoot, James Clarke's hair was cut off, which was a surprise to the production (11:00 in the DVD commentary). Rather than having him wear a wig, it was decided that his character, "Shaun", could be shorn. See more »

Goofs

When Didier Revol demonstrates his acting to Will Proudfoot in the church, a cigarette is in Didier's left hand. When he "shoots" himself in the head and falls to the ground, the cigarette vanishes. The smoke is in the foreground in one shot, but Didier never put it down. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Brethren Leader: Brother William, would you like to read today?
Will: [apprehensively carries Bible into middle of the street and reads] "O God, our Heavenly Father, who has commanded us to love one another as thy children."
See more »

Crazy Credits

Mack is listed last among the "Special Thanks To" names and refers to a dog mentioned at 94:45 on the DVD commentary. See more »

Connections

References Yentl (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Wild Boys
Performed by Duran Duran
Licensed courtesy of EMI Records Ltd
Written by Simon Le Bon (as Simon LeBon), Nick Rhodes, Andy Taylor,
John Taylor, Roger Taylor
Published by Gloucester Place Music Ltd./EMI Music Publishing Ltd.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Engaging and hilarious
17 April 2008 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Son of Rambow, set in 1980's England, tells the story of two young schoolboys making a home-video addition to the Rambo series. This promising theme gives rise to one of the most hilarious comedies in recent cinema, memorable not only for countless laugh-out-loud moments but also for its engaging and unexpectedly moving story.

Will Proudfoot (Bill Milner) and Lee Carter (Will Poulter) are a chalk and cheese pairing, thrown together by chance after being summoned to detention at school. Will, from a fatherless family in the grip of the austerely religious Brethren, is a heart-warmingly polite boy harbouring a boundlessly artistic imagination; Carter, from a parentless household, is a lonely rebel with a total lack of respect for everyone except his astoundingly self-absorbed brother, marvellously played by Ed Westwick. And yet, following their chance encounter, the situation where naïve and amiable Will is exploited by sharp-witted and seemingly cynical Carter is replaced by mounting empathy and friendship between the two, alternately spurred and severed by their family backgrounds and their turbulent film-making.

The two leads are remarkable debut actors, making the story touching and believable and realising the film's comic potential. Poulter is hilarious in the role of Carter, delivering stinging wit and outraged putdowns with aplomb. The shooting of the film provides some hysterical contrasts between grown-up pretensions and childlike absurdity, with gun-battle sequences ripped straight from 'Rambo: First Blood' interspersed with footage of a flying dog attack.

The overlapping secondary story, portraying the school-playground infatuation with the New Wave style of French exchange student Didier, is also a rich seam of humour; the stinging parody of teenage culture culminates in Will and Carter's visit to the school common room, populated by posing, pogoing teens. The supporting cast of adults also includes some fine comic actors, including Jessica Stevenson (notably of TV comedy Spaced) and Adam (of the Adam and Joe Show fame).

Writer-director Garth Jennings skilfully weaves together the overlapping worlds of children, teenagers and adults in this film with excellent dialogue and cinematography. The camera-work is striking in many places, particularly the opening montage of front gardens, with Lee riding his bike past and casually causing havoc. The film also benefits from its bubbly soundtrack, composed by Joby Talbot. This is a superb comedy and definitely the best Rambo film ever.


32 of 38 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?