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Persuasion (TV Movie 2007) Poster

(2007 TV Movie)

Quotes

Captain Wentworth: Miss Elliot, I can bear this no longer. You pierce my soul. I'm half agony, half hope. Unjust I may have been. Weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it eight years ago.

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Captain Wentworth: I have loved none but you. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone I think and plan. Have you not seen this?

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Captain Wentworth: I imagined myself indifferent to her but I was only angry and resentful. Too late... too late I began to understand myself and her. Never have I met her equal in good sense or sweetness of character. She's perfection itself. I've never loved any but her.

Captain Harville: We are talking now of Anne Elliot?

Captain Wentworth: Of course! Who else?

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Captain Wentworth: This is Henrietta and Louisa Musgrove, and this is Miss... Elliot.

Captain Harville: Miss Anne Elliot?

Anne Elliot: Yes.

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Captain Wentworth: [distressed and avoiding making eye contact] I have been charged by the Admiral... That is Admiral Croft has been confidently informed that Mr. Elliot... That everything is now set in your family for a marriage between yourself and Mr. Elliot. It was added that you were to live at Kellynch. The Admiral wished me to say that if this is the case that his lease will be canceled and he and my sister will find themselves another house... What answer should I give the Admiral

Anne Elliot: You will please thank the Admiral for me, but I must tell you that he is utterly misinformed.

[Capt Wentworth suddenly makes eye contact]

Captain Wentworth: [hopeful] Misinformed? Utterly?

Anne Elliot: Quite mistaken.

Captain Wentworth: No truth in any of it?

Anne Elliot: None.

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Anne Elliot: Captain... Captain. Are you going?

Captain Wentworth: Yes.

Anne Elliot: Is the first half at least not worth staying for?

Captain Wentworth: No. There's nothing worth me staying for. Good night.

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Sir Walter Elliot: Come, come, Anne! We must not be late. You cannot have forgotten we have an invitation from Lady Dalrymple.

Anne Elliot: I regret I am already engaged to spend the evening with an old school-friend.

Elizabeth Elliot: Not that sickly old widow in Westgate-buildings?

Anne Elliot: Mrs Smith. Yes.

Sir Walter Elliot: Smith? Westgate building?

Mrs. Clay: Excuse me.

Sir Walter Elliot: And who, pray, is Mrs Smith? One of the five thousand Smiths that are everywhere to be met with? Upon my word, Miss Anne Elliot, you have the most extraordinary taste. To place such a person ahead of your own family connections among the nobility of England and Ireland. Mrs Smith!

Anne Elliot: Perhaps she is not the only poor widow in Bath with little to live on and no surname of dignity. Good evening.

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Sir Walter Elliot: I must say, though, the worst of Bath is the number of plain women. I frequently observe that one pretty face would be followed by five and thirty frights.

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[Anne and Lady Russell join Sir Walter and Elizabeth in the garden, where the latter are enjoying eating strawberries and cream from a tray held by a servant]

Sir Walter Elliot: Lady Russell! Dear neighbor. You've been in London, I hear.

Lady Russell: Sir Walter, Elizabeth, may I say how truly sorry I am that you must leave Kellynch.

Sir Walter Elliot: We are blameless, Lady Russell, quite blameless. Every sacrifice has been made, however painful.

Elizabeth Elliot: We cut off all unnecessary charities at once, Lady Russell.

[She stuffs a large strawberry into her mouth and talks while chewing it]

Elizabeth Elliot: And even refrained from new-furnishing the drawing room, which, as you know... is in a frightful state.

Sir Walter Elliot: Still, it is a comfort to know we have done all we could.

[He glares at Anne]

Lady Russell: [with a hint of cynicism] Of course.

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Lady Russell: Anne! Who is Admiral Croft? And why does he cause you to be out of countenance so?... Anne.

Anne Elliot: Admiral Croft's wife is... is...

Lady Russell: Mrs. Croft.

Anne Elliot: Indeed. And Mrs. Croft is the sister of Captain... Frederick Wentworth.

Lady Russell: Wentworth? I see. I see.

Anne Elliot: To think that soon he may be walking through this house.

Lady Russell: Anne, you know that your father thought it a most unsuitable match. He would never have countenanced an alliance he deemed so degrading.

Anne Elliot: He was not alone, as I recall.

Lady Russell: My dear, to become engaged at 19, in the middle of a war, to a young naval officer who had no fortune and no expectations. You would indeed have been throwing yourself away. And I should have been failing in my duty as your godmother if I did not counsel against it. You were young, and it was entirely prudent to break off the understanding.

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[first lines]

[Anne has been upset and flustered as she hurries through Kellynch Hall, marking an inventory of items throughout the mansion. She spies Lady Russell's carriage approaching and goes outside to meet her. They talk while returning inside]

Anne Elliot: My dear Russell!

Lady Russell: My dear Anne. You look quite done for. I came back as soon as I received your letter. I had no idea the position was so worse.

Anne Elliot: Unfortunately, a person who has contracted debts must pay them, even if he is a gentleman.

Lady Russell: Was there no possibility of retrenchment?

Anne Elliot: Unfortunately, Father and Elizabeth could find no means of lessening their expenses without compromising their dignity, or relinquishing their comforts in a manner simply not to be borne. But I have, at last, persuaded Father to let out the house. And if I can insure that we live within our means, somewhat less extravagant, then, in only a few years, we may be solvent again.

Lady Russell: A few years!

Anne Elliot: In any event, it is better than selling. At least, one day, I may hope to return.

Lady Russell: And where are you to go in the meantime? Is it decided?

Anne Elliot: [smiling ruefully] All my hopes were for a small house nearby, but Father and Elizabeth have settled upon Bath.

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Trivia | Goofs | Crazy Credits | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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