6.0/10
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Wan fa gui zong yi Shao Lin (1976)

Prince Chien Lung, who soon became the Ching Dynasty's most famous and far-reaching emperor, travels with his bodyguard to locate a secret document offering evidence of the prince's Han ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Ying Bai ...
Ting Chao
Shao-Peng Chen
Kang Chin ...
(as Kong Kam)
Wei Hu
Kuan-Hsien Huang
Phillip Ko
Fa Yuan Li ...
(as Lee Fa Yuen)
Cliff Lok ...
(as Koo Lung)
Chung-Erh Lung
Fong Lung
Chang Ma
David Wei Tang
Chien-Po Tsen
Wei Ho Tu
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Storyline

Prince Chien Lung, who soon became the Ching Dynasty's most famous and far-reaching emperor, travels with his bodyguard to locate a secret document offering evidence of the prince's Han Chinese heritage. The document is held within Shaolin Temple. The Prince enlists the help of his cousin, who is a Kung Fu expert to go and get the document.

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Action

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Release Date:

1 September 1976 (Hong Kong)  »

Also Known As:

Das Erbe der 18 Bronzekämpfer  »

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Average kung fu with a political back story
6 August 2016 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

THE BEST OF SHAOLIN KUNG FU sounds like a clips compilation but in fact it's a politically-themed kung fu film starring Carter Wong. The storyline is about a prince who is travelling the countryside, searching for a secret document to reveal the truth about his heritage; to this end, his loyal bodyguard (played by Wong) fights off various opponents and enemies who stand in his way. The prince even enlists the aid of a relative to enter the Shaolin temple itself in a hunt for the missing scroll, thus undergoing a series of gruelling tests designed to push him to the limit.

The prince character is somewhat amoral in this film and takes a back seat to the proceedings, allowing Carter Wong to do the hard share of the fighting. The action is entertaining enough while at the same time lacking the finesse of, say, a Shaw Brothers movie, but then of course it was made in Taiwan for a lot less money without the wealth of talent that Shaw were able to afford over in Hong Kong. Cliff Lok does well in a fairly complex role and his episode in the Shaolin temple is the most interesting part of the movie.

THE BEST OF SHAOLIN KUNG FU features a cameo appearance for the popular 18 Bronze Men characters, although they only stand around and don't do any actual fighting. However, there are plenty of bouts with the monks themselves which are fun, and the use of no less than 12 different styles (including bird's foot style!) is engaging. One of my favourite moments is a fight with monk Phillip Ko on some vines hanging down a cliff face! The final fight, which is usually the highlight of a kung fu movie, is a little undistinguished, although not the worst I've seen.


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