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Ça c'est du cinéma (1951)

 -  Comedy  -  23 March 1951 (France)
3.5
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Ratings: 3.5/10 from 13 users  
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Laurel is a Scottish reporter suspected of being a spy by police detective James Finlayson. Although trailed by the latter, Stan, who is reporting on the movie world, manages to be hired by... See full summary »

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Title: Ça c'est du cinéma (1951)

Ça c'est du cinéma (1951) on IMDb 3.5/10

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Cast

Credited cast:
Monty Banks ...
(archive footage)
Marjorie Beebe ...
(archive footage)
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(archive footage)
Andy Clyde ...
(archive footage)
James Finlayson ...
(archive footage)
Ralph Graves ...
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(archive footage)
Charles Emmett Mack ...
(archive footage)
George Moran ...
(archive footage)
Harry A. Pollard ...
(archive footage)
Ben Turpin ...
(archive footage)
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Storyline

Laurel is a Scottish reporter suspected of being a spy by police detective James Finlayson. Although trailed by the latter, Stan, who is reporting on the movie world, manages to be hired by Mack Sennett. He makes his debut in Nevada, in the middle of gold diggers. After managing to clear his name he becomes, with Oliver Hardy, a big comedy star. Written by Guy Bellinger

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

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Release Date:

23 March 1951 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Hondros - Lignos kai sia  »

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Trivia

Although a French film, made up of footage of American origin, the addition of Peter Sellers's commentary meant that it qualified as a British film for quota purposes. See more »

Goofs

An introductory intertitle suggests that the film is "presented to cinema-goers of today as a tribute to one of the greatest pioneers of this industry", Mack Sennett. But the film features extracts from the productions of various other silent filmmakers, as well as sequences from sound films that have had their soundtracks replaced with new voices. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Cheap Compilation of Silent Comedy Clips
23 September 2010 | by (Denmark) – See all my reviews

Arthur Dent (founder of the UK production company Adelphi Films), hired Peter Sellers for the final time, and gave him the job to voice dub this French compilation of silent comedy clips. As you can see on the cast of this film, you see that the American kings of silent comedy films is all together in one mass up, but don't hold your breath, the clips are edited so cheaply together that you won't believe its supposed to look like one film.

You may ask why the French ever edited this together in the first place, and how Arthur Dent ever got the idea, that a French compilation of silent comedy clips ever would sell in the UK cinema's... I don't know, and honestly I don't care, the only thing I do know is that its not worth seeing.

I only give it two stars, because Sellers voice dubbing for Stan Laurel's character is so accurate to the real person himself.

(This film can be seen together with 'Penny Points to Paradise' and 'Let's Go Crazy' *The Adelphi Collection*, on the DVD and Blu-Ray released by BFI.)


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