Laurel is a Scottish reporter suspected of being a spy by police detective James Finlayson. Although trailed by the latter, Stan, who is reporting on the movie world, manages to be hired by... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
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Marjorie Beebe ...
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James Finlayson ...
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Charles Emmett Mack ...
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George Moran ...
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Storyline

Laurel is a Scottish reporter suspected of being a spy by police detective James Finlayson. Although trailed by the latter, Stan, who is reporting on the movie world, manages to be hired by Mack Sennett. He makes his debut in Nevada, in the middle of gold diggers. After managing to clear his name he becomes, with Oliver Hardy, a big comedy star. Written by Guy Bellinger

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Genres:

Comedy

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Details

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Release Date:

23 March 1951 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Hondros - Lignos kai sia  »

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Technical Specs

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although a French film, made up of footage of American origin, the addition of Peter Sellers's commentary meant that it qualified as a British film for quota purposes. See more »

Goofs

An introductory intertitle suggests that the film is "presented to cinema-goers of today as a tribute to one of the greatest pioneers of this industry", Mack Sennett. But the film features extracts from the productions of various other silent filmmakers, as well as sequences from sound films that have had their soundtracks replaced with new voices. See more »

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User Reviews

A compilation of old silent and early talkie clips
11 September 2011 | by See all my reviews

I've just discovered this interesting compilation. Although the conceit is that it's all one continuing narrative film no-one with any knowledge of old cinema would believe that for one minute. It's just an excuse to put together some old footage and there's nothing wrong with that. It's not all from silent film; there are excerpts from early two reel talkies as well.

Some scenes inevitably are better than others but some of the old stars shine just by their mere presence on screen. Actually I found Stan Laurel's continuous role a bit tedious but it was made much more palatable by the presence of Jimmy Finlayson, one of several actors here who should be better remembered than they are. Another is Billy Bevan who also lights up the screen with his antics.

Buster Keaton is of course very well known and deservedly so. He is a joy to watch transforming every scene he appears in. Finally I want to mention Marjorie Beebe, the only woman mentioned in the credits, and rightly so. The film races through various scenes with assorted flapper girls who all behave in rather similar ways. Not Marjorie Beebe. She was a singular talent and very much her own woman. Mack Sennett himself reckoned she had the potential to become the best of all time and just watching her routine with Harry Gribbon at the end you can see why.

I personally could have done without Peter Sellers' commentary. I found sometimes that there was an unpleasant sneer in his voice as if he thought he was superior to the material he was passing comment on. He could throw a good voice and wasn't a bad comic actor but I for one prefer the breathtaking inventiveness of a Buster Keaton or a Marjorie Beebe.


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