Director:

(as Alex Grasshoff)

Writers:

, (book)
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Narrator
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Bray ...
Himself - Prostheticist
Verlin Cobb ...
Herself - Surgery Patient
Charles Epstein ...
Himself - Cloning Researcher
William Epstein ...
Himself - Dermatologist (as Dr. William Epstein)
Samuel Kountz ...
Himself - Transplant Surgeon
James McGaugh ...
Himself - Psychobiologist
Erma Rimmer ...
Herself
Robert H. Rimmer ...
Himself
Carl Sheaffer ...
Himself - Heart Transplant Recipient
Alvin Toffler ...
Himself
Kurt Wagner ...
Himself - Plastic Surgeon
Grey Walter ...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 February 1972 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

References The Lady of Monza (1969) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
old anxieties still relevant for our times
4 September 2010 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

The Future Shock documentary was based on the best selling book by Alvin Toffler, and reflects the global ecological and technological concerns of society at the time.

THE GOOD: Awesome moody Moog-synth keyboard sounds, suggesting Future Shock was a stylistic forerunner of 'Blade Runner's' futuristic aesthetic. The doco also highlights many changing technologies that have indeed impacted on our civilisation. For example cloning, which was a completely implausible technology at the time, was discussed as a realistic possibility.

THE BAD: The style is at times stodgy and Wells puts on his very best harbinger-of-doom narration voice, whilst constantly bemoaning that 'Nothing is permanent any more' as though before that nothing had ever died or disintegrated in the whole history of the universe. Even heart transplants and artificial limbs are portrayed as examples of 'constant change, leading to Futureshock'. The double-sided nature of technology is not often discussed - most technology is seen as unequivocally bad.

Overall this program raises some good points that are still relevant today. It would have benefited from a deeper analysis of the ways technology would shape and even enhance our lives, rather than the overly-simplistic 'technology is change, and change is bad'. Clearly, not all change is bad, as in the case of desegregation and equal rights for women. But then, as a child of Future Shock, I don't know any different anyway!


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Future Shock (1972) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?