Egypt is at war with Ethiopia. Aida, captive Ethiopian slave, is in love Radames, captain of the Egyptian army. Amneris, Pharoah's daughter, is also in love with Radames. Aida is forced to choose either loyalty to Ethiopia or Radames.
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode credited cast:
Fiorenza Cossotto ...
Simon Estes ...
James McCracken ...
Leontyne Price ...
Edit

Storyline

Egypt is at war with Ethiopia. Aida, captive Ethiopian slave, is in love Radames, captain of the Egyptian army. Amneris, Pharoah's daughter, is also in love with Radames. Aida is forced to choose either loyalty to Ethiopia or Radames.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Music

Edit

Details

Release Date:

3 January 1985 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Followed by The Metropolitan Opera Presents: Tosca (1985) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Legendary Opera Farewell of Leontyne Price
30 December 2006 | by (Miami, FL) – See all my reviews

To say that this performance has an overwhelming quality is an understatement. Leontyne Price was 58, a few weeks shy of 59, when she performed this. Certainly her voice did not sound as it had 20 years earlier. That was our great fortune.

Her powers had not been diminished by that time, merely burnished to a warm, fiery glow. She was to sing many more years after this in concert performance, but this was her last performance in an opera anywhere as Speight Jenkins would announce at the last curtain calls.

Although this was entirely Miss Price's show, she was not alone on that stage. With her, was the gleaming tenor voice of James McCracken singing the role of Radames. He would be with us another four years before his demise. Famous for several roles among them in Wagnerian roles but mostly known for his Othello appearances.

Fiorenza Cossotto, with the stunning mezzo-soprano voice, played Amneris as no one may play her again. And an imposing Amonasro spun in gold by Simon Estes.

The most memorable moment in this live broadcast came when Miss Price was left all alone on the stage to sing "O Patria Mia". The aria had double significance for her and for us. This is a farewell aria for the character of Aida who sadly sings farewell to her country. But Miss Price was also singing her good-byes to HER country, America! She was visibly moved as she sang this. It was, after all, Miss Price's own farewell to HER country. I know this is all so contrived sounding, but believe me. In her hands, it was a moving tribute of her profound thanks for a stellar career to the United States (if not the world.) At the end of her aria, her last spun-in-gold note seem to just float, gleaming in the night air. What followed is one of those very special moments that one cannot ever forget.

The audience's ovation was prolonged and vociferous. After this, how could she acknowledge the audience's obvious excitement and appreciation? She could not break character. That would be verboten for a stage performer! Her lips quivered, she whimpered ever so slightly, her eyes began to well, but she remained immobile looking out into the audience. She was noticeably moved. She was true to her long professionalism on the stage. The clamor continued on and on...she bowed her head, lifted it up again, closed her eyes in affirmation. But the audience would not be silenced. Finally, she could not stand it anymore and finally her knees gave out and knelt before the audience...it seemed as if all hell had broken loose.

It continued for a bit longer. And she had an act and one-half to go! The moment remains frozen in time for me. It was brimming with untold emotions abounding in the Met Opera House. And it remains also in my heart. Whenever I see it in my now 20 year old VHS tape, I cannot help but be moved again.

It is time that this performance be transferred to DVD. My tape may not last forever. Herein, I beseech the Metropolitan Opera organization to move heaven and earth and bring this into circulation.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page