7.1/10
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Marley & Me (2008)

A family learns important life lessons from their adorable, but naughty and neurotic dog.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Lucy Merriam ...
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Storyline

After their wedding, newspaper writers John and Jennifer Grogan move to Florida. In an attempt to stall Jennifer's "biological clock", John gives her a puppy. While the puppy Marley grows into a 100 pound dog, he loses none of his puppy energy or rambunctiousness. Meanwhile, Marley gains no self-discipline. Marley's antics give John rich material for his newspaper column. As the Grogans mature and have children of their own, Marley continues to test everyone's patience by acting like the world's most impulsive dog. Written by Ken Miller <wkmiller704@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Heel the love See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Family

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic material, some suggestive content and language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

25 December 2008 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Marley and Me  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$60,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$36,367,586 (USA) (26 December 2008)

Gross:

$143,151,473 (USA) (24 April 2009)
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Company Credits

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Grogan: The original book's author appears as the Cocker Spaniel owner in the dog training class. See more »

Goofs

In the first scene in the their house, Jennifer is reading John's column, an ad on the back page has discount misspelled "diccount". See more »

Quotes

Colleen: I made a picture of me and Marley, Mommy wrote what I said Dear Marley I'll never forget you forever and there's kisses and hugs
John Grogan: That's pretty, why don't you put it there
[on the blanket covering Marley]
Conor: Dear Marley I love you more than anything in the whole world, I hope you like heaven and have lots of things to chew on, your brother Connor Richard Grogan
John Grogan: That's a good one.
Jennifer Grogan: Patrick do you want to say something?
Patrick: No.
Jennifer Grogan: I want to give him something
[takes off her necklace, to John]
Jennifer Grogan: your Dad gave me ...
[...]
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Connections

Referenced in American Dad!: Old Stan in the Mountain (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Lithium
Written by Kurt Cobain
Performed by Bruce Lash
Courtesy of CD Baby
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Surprisingly Good
28 December 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

When I first saw the previews for Marley and Me, I thought, ugh, another desperate attempt by Jennifer Aniston to resuscitate her career. I used to be a huge Aniston fan back in the "Friends" days, but it's been years since I've seen any of her movies. And as for Owen Wilson, he always seemed like a goof who rode on the wave of his older brother's success. This movie proved me wrong on both counts.

Marley and Me is about a dog, definitely, but it's just as much about a man (John Grogan, played by Wilson), his wife (Jenny, played by Aniston), and his growing family. The film follows John from his wedding night to the peak of his journalism career a dozen years later, years that are chronicled in his weekly columns for a Florida newspaper. Marley, the lovable but horribly destructive yellow lab, enters his life as a puppy, in an attempt to prepare him and his wife for future children. The dog, as expected, tears apart the house, makes wild escapes, humps the dog trainer, and lovably terrorizes other people. But the film effectively intersperses those episodes with tender, sincere moments of human/dog bonding. Marley is there to comfort Jenny when her husband cannot, adjusts to the children as they grow older, and intrudes on the family's most private moments. He is a constant, and at times, annoying presence, but Marley underscores the emotional tone of the film without dominating it.

Similarly, both Wilson and Aniston deliver understated performances that convey the ups-and-downs of any marriage. While it is the bond between John and Marley that the film explores most deeply, Jenny provides the link between dog, family, and children. In the end, she realizes what Marley has become, and what he has always been, to the two of them. The film's overall tone - light, humorous, but at times very real - builds up to an ending that is surprisingly moving.

Marley and Me is a tender-hearted, easy-going film that will appeal to any dog-lover. But it will also, I think, appeal to anyone who can look back on his or her life and trace a common thread through each passing year. A beloved pet, like Marley, has that unique capability. I wish I could thank my own dog for that. But, as one of the children in the movie tearfully says, I'm sure he already knows.


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