Ed approaches three CBS network executives (played by the Three Stooges) seeking help to improve his program.

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode credited cast:
...
Himself - Host
The Three Stooges ...
Themselves
Helen Forrest ...
Herself
...
Himself (as Bill Frawley)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Mr. B
...
...
Mr. S
Bob Lamond ...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

Ed approaches three CBS network executives (played by the Three Stooges) seeking help to improve his program.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Music

Edit

Details

Language:

Release Date:

11 March 1950 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The gag of trying to drop sandbags on The Three Stooges while they are singing was first done by Ted Healy and Fred Sanborn in Soup to Nuts (1930). See more »

Quotes

[pointing to an article in a magazine]
Host: This is a story about me. It's in "Radio Mirror". It's written by, uh, a, uh, Mrs. Ed Wynn. Probably a relative, you know.
See more »

Soundtracks

I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate
Written by Clarence Williams and A.J. Piron
Performed by Helen Forrest
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Bad. Really, really, really bad
28 August 2015 | by (California) – See all my reviews

People must have been desperate for any kind of entertainment in the early 1950s, or maybe it was because television was so new, but the studio audience was constantly going into hysterics even though this episode is nothing but recycled--not to mention poorly done--vaudeville gags, mistimed slapstick and forced and cringe-inducing "jokes" that aren't even remotely funny (example: Moe gets a saw and cuts a cheap piece of painted backdrop scenery, saying "That's the worst scene I ever saw". Wynn points to the saw and says, "That's the worst saw I ever seen"). The cheap and shoddy sets would embarrass Ed Wood and the "writing"--for lack of a better word--wouldn't pass muster in an elementary-school play. The whole thing reminded me of a really bad public-access cable show. I understand that this was live TV and there's always the possibility that things could go wrong, but after watching this for a few minutes I began to wonder if they ever even rehearsed the show before it aired. Wynn constantly stumbles over or even forgets his lines and seems to be overwhelmed by what's going on around him, and compounds that by, for some reason, constantly trying to upstage The Three Stooges. It gets annoying after a while, then frustrating. Singer Helen Forrest puts in an appearance, and the Stooges try to keep things moving and actually have a few good moments despite Wynn's constant fluttering around the stage and trying to talk over them, but overall this is a very poor example of early television. I was never a very big Ed Wynn fan, but even if I was I wouldn't be able to finish watching this mess--which, in fact, I wasn't.

It's not that I have anything against early television--I was a kid when a lot of these shows originally aired, and I remember with great fondness such "Golden Age of Television" shows as "The Honeymooners", "Your Show of Shows", "Studio One", even "The Abbott and Costello Show". Unfortunately, this episode is about as far outside the "Golden Age" as it's possible to get. Maybe some of the later episodes were better than this one. I hope so, because it would be difficult--if not impossible--for them to be worse.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Episode #1.25 (1950) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?