7.6/10
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The Book Thief (2013)

PG-13 | | Drama, War | 27 November 2013 (USA)
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While subjected to the horrors of World War II Germany, young Liesel finds solace by stealing books and sharing them with others. In the basement of her home, a Jewish refugee is being protected by her adoptive parents.

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(based on the novel by), (screenplay)
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2,718 ( 108)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 8 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Narrator / Death (voice)
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Julian Lehmann ...
Gotthard Lange ...
Grave Digger
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Priest
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Nico Liersch ...
Ludger Bökelmann ...
Paul Schaefer ...
Nozomi Linus Kaisar ...
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Robert Beyer ...
Jewish Accountant
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Storyline

In 1938, the young girl Liesel Meminger is traveling by train with her mother and her younger brother when he dies. Her mother buries the boy in a cemetery by the tracks and Liesel picks up a book, "The Gravediggers Handbook", which was left on the grave of her brother and brings it with her. Liesel is delivered to a foster family in a small town and later she learns that her mother left her because she is a communist. Her stepmother, Rosa Hubermann, is a rude but caring woman and her stepfather, Hans Hubermann, is a simple kind-hearted man. Liesel befriends her next door neighbor, the boy Rudy Steiner, and they go together to the school. When Hans discovers that Liesel cannot read, he teaches her using her book and Liesel becomes an obsessed reader. During a Nazi speech where the locals are forced to burn books in a bonfire, Liesel recovers one book for her and the Mayor's wife Ilsa Hermann witnesses her action. Meanwhile Hans hides the Jewish Max Vandenburg, who is the son of a ... Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

book | basement | nazi | girl | library | See All (78) »

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From the Studio that brought you The Life of Pi See more »

Genres:

Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence and intense depiction of thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

27 November 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ladrona de libros  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$19,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$105,005 (USA) (8 November 2013)

Gross:

$21,483,154 (USA) (4 April 2014)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the novel, as well as Liesel, there is a character called Kurt, like two of the Von Trapp children from The Sound of Music (1965). See more »

Goofs

During the book-burning sequence, a cage-like sub-structure can be seen where the book props have burned away from their mound-shaped form. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: One small fact: you are going to die. Despite every effort, no one lives forever. Sorry to be such a spoiler. My advice is when the time comes, don't panic. It doesn't seem to help.
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Connections

Featured in 19th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Wiegenlied: Guten Abend, Gut Nacht, Op. 49, No. 4
Written by Johannes Brahms
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A Flat Out Amazing and Emotional Instant Classic!
10 December 2013 | by (Right Here) – See all my reviews

This is a flat out amazing film. It's nuanced, extremely thoughtful and features some of the strongest performances of the year. If I had a vote, we'd get another young teenage girl nominated for "best actress" in a lead role for Sophie Nelisse's amazing work. Everyone's work here is award worthy. Sure, the subject matter may seem like a rehash (The Diary of Anne Frank"/"The Boy in the Striped Pajamas"/The Pianist") but it really isn't. It's fresh, and packs the most emotional impact of any film that I've seen all year. Captivating and extremely powerful, the film is hauntingly beautiful. It moves at an effortless pace which allows the viewer to become immersed in the realities of Liesel's situation. That pace may not be for everyone but I found it to be perfect. Everything breaths properly and every connection made is heartfelt and meaningful. The literary vehicle of death as the narrator really is a masterstroke and works perfectly. It starts the film and finishes but is never intrusive.

I honestly feel this film is an instant classic. It really stayed with me after watching it and I'm still moved by its impact.


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