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Tavake (2006)

Set in the Kingdom of Tonga (South Pacific Islands), this film looks at the influence and encroachment of western culture as shown in the relationship of a young man and his traditional father.

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Cast

Cast overview:
William Guttenbeil ...
Tavake (as William Guttenbiel)
Opeti Mahina ...
Mohokoi
Folau Kaitapu ...
Mother (as Folau)
Soane Paulo Po'oi ...
Friend 1 (as Soane Paulo)
Ofa Liongitau ...
Friend 2 (as Ofa)
Hepoto Pasikala ...
Market Man (as Hepoto)
Ilaisa Helu ...
Kava Man 1 (as Ilisa Helu)
Poi Tonga Vea ...
Kava Man 2 (as Poitonga)
Makalita Kalavi ...
Girl at Kava (as Hie'ilo)
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Storyline

Set in the Kingdom of Tonga (South Pacific Islands), this film looks at the influence and encroachment of western culture as shown in the relationship of a young man and his traditional father.

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

23 February 2006 (USA)  »

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Budget:

$5,000 (estimated)
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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Soundtracks

Kava Singing
Traditional
Performed by Tamaiki Mei Atenisi
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User Reviews

 
The shimmering roots of a potentially masterful filmmaker
9 July 2006 | by See all my reviews

I saw this short student film at the 2005 Zaki Gordon Film Festival and I was extremely impressed. Although it does display all the inescapably low-grade aspects of a no-budget student thesis short (i.e. bad picture quality and lack-luster performances), Tavake is a beautifully crafted film that is both touching and culturally informative. I was constantly surprised by how Tavake could make a story about the cultural and generational gaps between a father and son in Tonga so universally relevant to a born-and-raised American such as myself. Although expectedly flawed, this first outing by director Paul Stoll really shows the shimmering roots of a potentially masterful filmmaker whose heartwarming gift for storytelling and gracefully slow pace would be a refreshing change-of-pace to silver screens everywhere.


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