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"Walking with Dinosaurs" Giant of the Skies (TV Episode 1999) Poster

Goofs

Factual errors 

Ornithocheirus is not the largest pterosaur ever to have lived, as the program claims - that title belongs to either Quetzalcoatlus (which appears in the documentary and is described being bigger) or Hatzegopteryx. It is unlikely that Ornithocheirus' wingspan could reach 12 meters. The largest known specimen only has a 6 m wingspan.
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Jump to: Continuity (2) | Factual errors (1) | Miscellaneous (3) | Revealing mistakes (23)

Continuity 

The shot of the Iguanodont youngsters playing with the Polacanthus has been either flipped, or the Polacanthus decided to walk in the opposite direction for a moment. In either case, it's heading in the other direction again a couple of seconds later.
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The Utahraptor puppets and CGI models have different colored eyes.
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Factual errors 

Utahraptor is shown in Europe, but has only been found in North America.
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Miscellaneous 

When we first see the herd of Iguanodonts walking along the coast line, one of them wanders off to the left side of the screen. It seems to be missing its right hind foot! Its leg just ends without a foot as it walks. It can be assumed that this specimen has simply been injured, however it doesn't limp, and there is no indication as to what could have bitten off its foot. Thus, it is most likely an animation error.
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When the young Iguanodont nudges the Polacanthus, its arm doesn't cast a shadow over the Polacanthus' backside.
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During one of the flying shots, the body of Ornithocheirus overlaps a lens flare.
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Revealing mistakes 

In the first Iguanodon scene, some of the creatures' feet are not touching the ground.
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In various shots, the long fingers of CG pterosaurs pass through their wings.
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The Polacanthus' spikes keep moving on its shoulder.
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Some of the Ornithocheirus at the mating grounds are transparant.
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In one scene, an Iguanodon starts running and leaves distinct footprints in the sand. However, when it is about to start running, there are no foot prints behind it at all, as if it had been standing there for days.
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When the two Utahraptors jump on the Iguanodon, one of the second raptor's hands passes through the Iguanodon's shoulder.
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As the two Utahraptors are trying to bring down the Iguanodon, the foot of the left raptor switches from being on the Iguanodon's hind leg to its front leg in a matter of frames. At the end of this whole sequence, as the Iguanodon is finally brought to the ground, you can see that one of the Utahraptors is biting its neck. If you are quick, you can spot some of its clawed fingers disappearing into the neck of the Iguanodon and passing completely through it to where they belong: on the other side of the neck.
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When the Utahraptor jumps on the Iguanodon's back and falls off again, its tail passes through the Iguanodon's, while its complete right leg clips through the Iguanodon's body.
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In at least one shot of the American Iguanodon (brown) eating the leaves of a tree, the edge of the animatronic puppet's neck is visible as the rubber skin wobbles a bit.
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Several shots reveal that the Ornithocheirus's head is clearly a puppet, as on the bottom corner of the screen you can see part of the puppeteer's hand and even wires hanging out of the puppet's neck.
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Near the end of the first shot showing the Ornithocheirus mating ground, the two animals next to each other on the left are making the exact same motions. Of course, nearly all of the animals were animated to repeat only one set of motions, but these two are making them at the same time.
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As the Ornithocheirus flies over the mating grounds, it doesn't cast a shadow on the Ornithocheirus on the ground (only on the ground itself).
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When the Utahraptors open their mouths, you can clearly see the skin pattern from the back of their necks inside, instead of flesh, making them look hollow and empty.
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As the male Ornihtocheirus soars above the crowded mating ground, in one badly rendered shot, he flies behind the crowd, and the animals resting on the ground suddenly appear to be exceptionally tiny. Yet he himself remains to be gigantic, even though he has already flown into the background. The animation layers must have been mixed up.
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When the Ornithocheirus leaves the European island with the Utahraptors on it, the two eating raptors are clearly repeating the exact same motions.
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The water that burst out of the blow-hole clearly passes right through the Tapejara that's sitting atop the cliff. Although its movement indicated it's shaking water off its body, the animators forgot to make it look wet, and the splash effect is also missing.
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After the victorious male Tapejara drives off his opponent, take a close look at his shoulders: flaps of "skin" jut out of it as he crouches, indicating there's an animation error here.
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As the Iguanodonts chew, the skin on both sides of their "cheeks" protrudes outward unrealistically, as if being made out of hard rubber - which, in fact, is true.
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As the Ornithocheirus catches a fish, you can only see the head of the animal, even though its body and its huge wings are also supposed to be in sight. The must have forgotten to animate the rest of its body into the shot.
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The tip of the grooming Ornithocheurus' beaks constantly pass through the membranes on the front of their arms.
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When the male Ornithocheirus attacks the smaller pterosaur, his legs, very briefly, pass through the other animal's wing.
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When the Ornithocheirus begins to fly over the Atlantic, it doesn't cast a shadow over the water surface, as it does in later shots.
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In certain shots, when the Ornithocheirus flaps its huge wings, a segment of its wing membrane seems to become unattached from its arm, as you can tell by the thin dark line that appears between the arm and the membrane.
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See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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