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The Counterfeiters (2007)

Die Fälscher (original title)
R | | Crime, Drama, War | 18 April 2008 (USA)
The story of the Operation Bernhard, the largest counterfeiting operation in history, carried out by Germany during WWII.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (screenplay)

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Won 1 Oscar. Another 6 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Martin Brambach ...
August Zirner ...
Dr. Klinger
Veit Stübner ...
Atze
...
Andreas Schmidt ...
Zilinski
Tilo Prückner ...
Hahn
...
Loszek
Marian Kalus ...
Plappler
Norman Stoffregen ...
Abramovic
Bernd Raucamp ...
KZ-Insasse Dusche
Gode Benedix ...
1. KZ-Insasse
Oliver Kanter ...
2. KZ-Insasse
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Storyline

The Counterfeiters is the true story of the largest counterfeiting operation in history, set up by the Nazis in 1936. Salomon "Sally" Sorowitsch is the king of counterfeiters. He lives a mischievous life of cards, booze, and women in Berlin during the Nazi-era. Suddenly his luck runs dry when arrested by Superintendent Friedrich Herzog. Immediately thrown into the Mauthausen concentration camp, Salomon exhibits exceptional skills there and is soon transferred to the upgraded camp of Sachsenhausen. Upon his arrival, he once again comes face to face with Herzog, who is there on a secret mission. Hand-picked for his unique skill, Salomon and a group of professionals are forced to produce fake foreign currency under the program Operation Bernhard. The team, which also includes detainee Adolf Burger, is given luxury barracks for their assistance. But while Salomon attempts to weaken the economy of Germany's allied opponents, Adolf refuses to use his skills for Nazi profit and would like to... Written by Sony Pictures Classics

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

It takes a clever man to make money, it takes a genius to stay alive See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some strong violence, brief sexuality/nudity and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

18 April 2008 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Counterfeiters  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

€4,200,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$87,514 (USA) (24 February 2008)

Gross:

$5,484,715 (USA) (22 August 2008)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Austria's The Counterfeiters (2007) was the winner in the 'Best Foreign Language Film' category at the 80th Academy Awards in 2008. The film was much criticized as conventional and artistically inferior to Cristian Mungiu's acclaimed Palme d'Or winner 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (2007), which wasn't even nominated. This spectacular snub resulted in intense scrutiny by the international press and ridicule of the Academy Awards by the film community. Eventually this inspired reforms to the 'Best Foreign Language Film' selection process. See more »

Goofs

When Solly and Burger are arguing in their sleeping quarters, Burger pulls down a bunk bed. In the next shot the bed is standing up. See more »

Quotes

Salomon 'Sally' Sorowitsch: Only by surviving, we can defeat them.
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Connections

Referenced in The Rotten Tomatoes Show: Watchmen/Shuttle/12 (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Wenn nicht die Hoffnung wär
(uncredited)
Written by Joseph Schmidt
Performed by Joseph Schmidt
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The moral dilemma of helping madmen
24 November 2007 | by (Berkeley, California) – See all my reviews

The story of Die Fälscher had to be told because it is a unique one that reveals both an extraordinary Jeweish experience under the Nazis, that of the arch-counterfeiter and surviver Salomon Sorowitsch (or "Sallie," Karl Markovics), and another level of Third Reich insanity, their idea, or somebody's, of flooding the market with fake pounds sterling and American dollars and thus somehow bringing down the Allies through economic sabotage, late in the game.

On the other hand when one compares this film with something with the grandeur of sweeping Holocaust films like Spielberg's Schindler's List and Polanski's The Pianist, or the poetry of Lajos Koltai's Fateless (Sorstalanság), Ruzowitzsky's film seems somehow pinched and narrow-minded. It's a good story and a tense one but it dos not sing and it will not change your life.

One reason is that the Russian-born Sallie--his story framed by inconclusive later episodes of his gambling after the war-- is such an unappealing figure. He is an ugly little hard-faced man, expressionless at key moments, and extremely difficult to care about. And nobody cares about him. When he gets syphoned off with some others from the direct path to concentration camp death at Mauthausen to work on the Nazi's mad secret project , he is the key to its success. There are bankers, printers, graphic designers, lithographers ; not evidently any other counterfeiters at all, but we take it on faith that he is an ace at the trade, worthy to head up any team aimed at creating banknotes foolproof enough to survive repeated scrutiny in massive quantities. The other men on the team bow to him, because he alone can maintain quality control and make the project a success. But do they want to make it a success? Herein lies the obvious dilemma. For Sorowitsch, survival is the priority. At the opposite extreme, Adolf Burger (August Diehl), a collotype specialist whose printing experience was for leftist political purposes, sabotaging the project is the only real option.

All we know is that SS Chief Inspector Herzog (David Striesow) supervises this business; and it was he who arrested Sorowitsch in the first place. Sorowitsch has managed to gain favor in the camp by putting himself forward as a gifted sketch artist who does portraits of officers families. Apparently this has gone on for years before the counterfeiting scheme began. The screenplay is a bit vague about the background of this effort, who approved it, who masterminded it; obviously it is essential to the welfare of Herzog. But as the Nazis' situation becomes increasingly desperate and Berger's efforts to block the making of a perfect dollar keep succeeding, Herzog himself is in trouble.

There are other important characters that give the story life. The sweet young Russian boy Kolya (Sebastian Urzendowsky) is a purist, living only for his individual style and his love of the classic Russian modernists. Unfortunately he has tuberculosis, and no one can save him, not the resident doctor, Klinger (August Zirner), nor Sallie with his bargaining power over the increasingly desperate Herzog.

All this definitely holds your attention in its rather terrible grip. The duel between Sallie and the idealistic Burger achieves a tormenting level of moral complexity. Sallie is selfish, but in saving himself he is saving the whole team; in wanting to become a martyr Burger is volunteering the others for martyrdom without their permission. in between there are drones and bankers who simply want to do a job and if possible somehow also stay alive. Outside the counterfeiting team's little compound where the beds have nice linen terrible things happen, and sometimes the terror penetrates in to them too.

The most powerful sequence is at war's end when the "real" concentration camp prisoners, dirty, bleeding, and skeletal, creep into the money makers barracks with guns, unable to believe they are prisoners. This sets the experience in the context of nightmare horror and grasps a minute of the awesome poetry of Fateless' final moments, when the fifteen-year-old György Köves wanders into Budapest and takes a tram wearing his prison stripes. Otherwise, good acting and a compelling story still aren't enough to put this in the first rank of films of this genre.


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