Doctor Who (1963–1989)
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The Sun Makers: Part Four 

Attempting to start a successful revolution, the Doctor uses Pluto's Public Address System to announce successful revolution, all the while trying to determine the Collector's true species ... See full summary »

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...
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Gatherer Hade
Henry Woolf ...
David Rowlands ...
Bisham
Jonina Scott ...
Marn
Roy Macready ...
Cordo
William Simons ...
Mandrel
Michael Keating ...
Goudry
Adrienne Burgess ...
Veet
Derek Crewe ...
Synge
Colin McCormack ...
Commander
Tom Kelly ...
Guard
...
K9 (voice)
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Storyline

Attempting to start a successful revolution, the Doctor uses Pluto's Public Address System to announce successful revolution, all the while trying to determine the Collector's true species and why he, or it, seems set on taxing the life out of humans. Written by statmanjeff

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17 December 1977 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

This story marks the last appearance of Leela's darker outfit. For the next two serials - her last - she would continue to wear the lighter (and more revealing) one. See more »

Quotes

The Collector: Grinding oppression of the masses is the only policy that pays dividends.
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User Reviews

 
Death and Taxes
13 January 2015 | by See all my reviews

Review of all 4 episodes:

This story is a light-hearted adventure which is a political satire of tax, greedy capitalism and bureaucracy. A few may think the heavier taxation from left-wing government is being attacked. I on the other hand agree with the majority who see it as an attack on greedy capitalist right-wing politics. This is shown in the clear capitalism of the villainous wealthy overlords with oppressed workers paying taxes to fund the sheer greed of the elite until the downtrodden workers unite against them. It works very well indeed both as sheer fun entertainment and as an amusing satire.

The Doctor, Leela and K-9 arrive in a future Pluto colony controlled by wicked tax collectors who control and oppress the hard working population, exploiting them completely and secretly sending the profits to their unknown alien masters. The Doctor shakes things up.

There are numerous clever tax linked jokes such as names of corridors being tax form titles and the silliness and cruelty of aspects of the system are successfully made fun of. There is much enjoyment to be had in this adventure and there are some serious points made too. The first two parts are stronger than the final two parts but it is all good fun. An example of when the more light, humorous stories can work very well. I cannot say the same for the adventure which followed next!


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