Prime Suspect 7: The Final Act (2006) - News Poster

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ITV Plans "Prime Suspect" Prequel Series

ITV has announced plans for "Tennison," a six-part hourlong period drama and prequel to the famed "Prime Suspect" series which remains one of Helen Mirren's most defining works.

Much like "Endeavour" does for "Inspector Morse," the new series will explore the early days in the career of Jane Tennison who would become one of the first female Detective Chief Inspectors in the Metropolitan Police.

In the series which is set in the 1970s, we see how a then 22-year-old probationary officer Tennison became such a complex and formidable character in a time when female police constables are being uneasily 'integrated' into the force.

She is soon thrown in at the deep end, drawn into a brutal murder investigation, and experiences first-hand London's violent criminal ganglands. Lynda La Plante, who penned the earlier instalments in the series, will return to write this.

Mirren last played the role in 2006's "Prime Suspect: The Final Act
See full article at Dark Horizons »

“How Very Saucy,” Helen Mirren Says On Being Recipient Of Hasty Pudding 2014 Woman of the Year Award

The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the oldest theatrical organization in the United States, announces Academy Award-winning actress Dame Helen Mirren as the recipient of its 2014 Woman of the Year Award.

“How very saucy of the Hasty Pudding organisation to offer me their award,” said Dame Helen Mirren. “As someone who adores Pudding in all its manifestations… Suet, Christmas, Treacle, Bread and Butter, Yorkshire, Plum, Figgy, etc., etc., I am so looking forward to the famous Hasty Pudding.”

Helen Mirren has won international recognition for her work on stage, screen and television. For her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II in 2006 of “The Queen,” she received an Academy Award®, Golden Globe, Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award®, and BAFTA Award for Best Actress.

In 2013, she again met critical acclaim for reprising her role of Queen Elizabeth II, this time in Peter Morgan’s play “The Audience.” For her performance, she was awarded the prestigious
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rookies fill Emmys race for Best Movie/Miniseries Direction

Rookies fill Emmys race for Best Movie/Miniseries Direction
First-time nominees fill this year's Best Movie/Miniseries Director category. These helmers hail from across the United States and Europe and directed diverse works set in various times over the past century -Inserts:25- Brian Percival directed three of the seven episodes of "Downton Abbey." PBS edited these down to four installments and Percival contends for helming the first of these. This episode set up the main storylines and introduced more than a dozen characters, including Emmy nominees Elizabeth McGovern and Maggie Smith as a battling set of in-laws. Percival has a keen eye for period detail and a flair for melodrama. Two years ago, Derbhla Walsh won this race for the first part of the miniseries "Little Dorrit." Besides Walsh, the British have done well in this race as of late with wins by Philip Martin ("Prime Suspect: The Final Act," 2007), and Tom Hooper ("Elizabe...
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Killing: BBC4's new Scandinavian import

It's Prime Suspect meets State Of Play via Wallander and every bit as good as that sounds. Meet Inspector Sarah Lund, star of Danish cult hit Forbrydelsen (The Killing)

Gravelly goddess Sharon Gless telling the flasher to put it away during the opening credits of Cagney & Lacey. Helen Mirren's Dci Jane Tennison insisting that Met misogynists call her guv, not ma'am, in Prime Suspect. The 80s power-hair of Jill Gascoine in The Gentle Touch and Heather Locklear in Tj Hooker – so huge it barely fits on their warrant card photos. There is nothing quite like a female TV cop. And we've been waiting ages – four years, in fact, since the Kleenex-crumpling climax of Prime Suspect: The Final Act – for another worthy one to come along. But already this year, like buses with blue lights on top, two have arrived at once.

A fortnight ago, the annual Above Suspicion mini-series brought us the formidable,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Joe Carnahan's The Grey Greenlit to Start Production; Cast Fills Out

We couldn't be happier that director Joe Carnahan has gotten a green light to start production next week on The Grey, a thriller that stars Liam Neeson, and we also are liking the actors that have filled out his cast. With the lack of female names, could this be the next The Thing?

Per Deadline New York Neeson will be joined on the shoot by Dallas Roberts (Tell Tale, Joshua, "Rubicon"), James Badge Dale ("24", "Rubicon"), Dermot Mulroney (Zodiac, Hair High), Frank Grillo (Mother's Day, My Soul to Take), Nonso Anozie (RocknRolla, "Prime Suspect: The Final Act"), and Joe Anderson (The Crazies, The Ruins). They play oil-rig roughnecks left stranded by a plane crash right in the hunting zone of a pack of rogue wolves on the frozen Alaskan tundra.

Coming off the Fox film The A-Team, Carnahan said he was glad to be making a down and dirty indie, even
See full article at Dread Central »

Frank Deasy's wife talks about his plea for organ donors: 'He just couldn't believe the impact his story had'

Emmy-winning screenwriter Frank Deasy's Observer article about the plight of transplant patients, written just before his death, provoked an astonishing response. As his last TV drama comes to the screen, his wife Marie talks about his lasting legacy

The gleaming golden Emmy was never designed to be unobtrusive, but in this Glasgow front room the winged statuette is as far into the corner of the mantelpiece as it can squeeze, semi-shielded by a modest-sized photograph of its winner, screenwriter Frank Deasy.

"He didn't really want it on show, he was a bit embarrassed what people coming round to the house might think," says his wife Marie with a smile. He said: 'You can't have it out up there!' I'm not sure where he thought it should go, in a drawer maybe."

A cluster of other awards are up there, too: the phenomenally talented Deasy was into his professional stride,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Interview: 'Father & Son' Drama Premieres on Rte

'Father & Son', Rte One's latest summer drama will premiere Monday June 29 at 9.30pm. A co-production between Rte and ITV, this four part drama which has a formidable cast of actors including Dougray Scott, Stephen Rea and Sophie Okonedo, is tipped to be rich, compelling and highly entertaining. Director of the project was Brian Kirk (My Boy Jack, Middletown), whilst producer was Micheal Casey (My Boy Jack, Middletown), the script was written by Emmy award winning Irish writer Frank Deasy (Prime Suspect: The Final Act) and Dop wasRuairi O'Brien (Running Mate). These talents coupled with an all star cast including Dougray Scott (Mission Impossible II), Stephen Rea (The Crying Game), Sophie Okonedo (Hotel Rwanda), John Kavanagh (The Tudors) and Flora Montgomery (When Brendan Met Trudy) guarantees that audiences are in for a treat with this four part series. Iftn caught up with the series producer Michael Casey to talk about the scale of the series,
See full article at IFTN »

News: Key2Time Tracer Interviewed

  • Kasterborous
The new Big Finish 3 part serial Key2Time stars Peter Davison as the Fifth Doctor charged with tracking down the pieces of the Key to Time in order to... well, that would be telling.  One thing you should know however is that the Key to Time detectors - known as tracers - are sentient, and played by Ciana Jansen and Laura Doddington. Doddington - who has appeared on TV in The Bill, Doctors and as PC Wood in Prime Suspect: The Final Act - has chatted with the Big Finish website about the...
See full article at Kasterborous »

Living's 'Lipstick' draws just 200,000

Living's new US acquisition Lipstick Jungle got off to a poor start in the ratings last night despite a high-profile marketing campaign. The series, from Sex and the City writer Candace Bushnell, drew just 198,000 (1.4%) to the channel in the 10pm hour. The figure was only marginally higher than the 197,000 who watched Living With Jade Goody and a CSI repeat in the same slot last week. Leading the hour was BBC Three, with 462,000 (2.8%) for its EastEnders repeat and 200,000 (1.6%) for new comedy Massive. Ross Kemp: A Kenya Special brought in 532,000 (2.8%) to Sky1 over 90 minutes from 9pm and Film4's screening of the movie Mr & Mrs Smith averaged 388,000 (2.4%) between 9pm and 11.20pm. Also rating higher than Lipstick were ITV3's showing of Prime Suspect: The Final Act, with 244,000 (2.3%); Alan (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'The Sopranos' Win & Lose Big at Emmys

  • WENN
'The Sopranos' Win & Lose Big at Emmys
The Sopranos, miniseries Broken Trail, Tony Bennett and Prime Suspect shared the glory at the Emmy Awards in Los Angeles on Sunday night, claiming three honors apiece. But, as well as being among the big winners, mobster drama The Sopranos was also the ceremony's big loser - despite making history as the Emmys' most nominated show, its cast members were overlooked in all the individual acting categories. Even Boston Legal star James Spader was stunned when he beat The Sopranos' James Gandolfini for the Best Actor prize. He said, "Oh my goodness, I feel like I just stole a pile of money from the Mob - and they're all sitting right over there." Instead, the show, which ended in America in May, claimed the Outstanding Drama Series prize and awards for writing and directing. In his send-off speech, the show's creator David Chase joked, "Let's face it, if the world and this nation was run by gangsters... Maybe it is!" Tony Bennett's hits show, Tony Bennett: An American Classic, claimed the night's Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special prize, while Rob Marshall was named Outstanding Director for the special and Bennett himself took home the Outstanding Individual Performance honor. Robert Duvall and Thomas Haden Church won acting prizes for acclaimed western Broken Trail, which also claimed the night's Outstanding Miniseries award. And Oscar winner Helen Mirren added to her 2007 trophies when she claimed an Outstanding Lead Actress honor for Prime Suspect: The Final Act. The British police drama also picked up directing and writing awards. Ugly Betty star America Ferrera was by far the night's most popular individual winner - a huge roar went up at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles when she was named Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series.

'Suspect' ending fit for a queen

'Suspect' ending fit for a queen
The Sopranos wasn't the only TV program to get a fond farewell from the Emmy voters.

Prime Suspect, the 16-year-old franchise from PBS' Masterpiece Theater, collected three Emmys for its seventh and last installment, The Final Act.

Fresh off her Oscar victory for The Queen, Suspect star Helen Mirren added an Emmy for lead actress in a miniseries or movie. Despite stiff competition in the miniseries field from another multiple winner, AMC's Broken Trail, Suspect also took home two more for writing and directing.

"You took our piece of work to your hearts, and you made what it became, which was a piece of iconic television," Mirren said in accepting the award.

Final Act, a co-production of ITV and WGBH, featured Mirren continuing in the role of Jane Tennison, a London Metropolitan Police detective struggling with the demands of life and work.

In an interview backstage, Mirren noted that the long haul of Suspect has allowed her to invest the role with her own personal issues. "It was an incredible opportunity to be honest about who I was," she said.

BBC leads nominees for BAFTA TV awards

LONDON -- The BBC dominated the field Wednesday as the 2007 BAFTA Television Award nominations were announced. It earned 37 mentions, including two each in the best actor and actress categories.

The awards, the annual gala highlight of the U.K television industry, will be televised live May 20 on BBC1.

With 20 nominations, Channel 4 is the pubcaster's closest rival, while ITV came in third with 14 noms, the Five channel racked up two, and digital network Sky One earned three.

Longford, Channel 4's examination of the aftermath of the chilling 1970s Moors murders, earned four nominations and will see co-stars Jim Broadbent and Andy Serkis compete for the best actor award alongside John Simm from BBC1's Life on Mars and Michael Sheen in Kenneth Williams: Fantabulousa!

Longford also is up for best single drama, competing against Fantabulosa, The Road to Guantanamo and Housewife 49.

Mars was nominated in the best drama series category alongside first-timers The Street and Sugar Rush and third-time nominee Shameless. And in the drama serial category, Prime Suspect: The Final Act takes on The Virgin Queen, See No Evil: The Moors Murders and drama thriller Low Winter Sun.

In the debuting international category, Entourage, House, Lost and My Name Is Earl will face off for the prize.

'Prime' time: Mirren takes RTS nod

'Prime' time: Mirren takes RTS nod
LONDON -- Helen Mirren added another gong to her already overstuffed awards cabinet Tuesday night, winning the best actress award for her performance in ITV's Prime Suspect at the Royal Television Society television awards.

Mirren was recognized for performance as embattled female cop Jane Tennison in the final season of the show, which sees her character battling alcoholism and struggling to protect her collapsing career.

Michael Sheen's performance as comic legend Kenneth Williams in BBC4's Fantabulosa earned him the best actor award while writer-comedian Stephen Merchant won best comedy performance for Extras. West End audition show "How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria" was named best entertainment show for BBC1 while More 4's Death of a President was voted best digital program.

ITV's wartime biopic Housewife 49 was named best single drama and ITV2's HBO-produced Entourage was voted best acquisition. The Queen screenwriter Peter Morgan was named best writer for Channel 4 drama Longford.

Mirren still rolling with RTS nom

Mirren still rolling with RTS nom
LONDON -- Fresh off her best actress Oscar for The Queen, Helen Mirren is in the running for the Royal Television Society's top acting nod, this time for reprising the role of Detective Inspector Jane Tennyson in the final Prime Suspect, it was announced Monday.

The annual RTS awards will be held March 13 at the Grosvenor House hotel on London's Park Lane.

The Granada-produced drama that has gripped audiences since Mirren debuted the role in 1991 also has been nominated in the best drama series category along with Channel 4 cop drama Low Winter Sun and Sky One fairytale Hogfather.

Nominated alongside Mirren in the best actress category are Susan Lynch for her portrayal of a police sign-language interpreter who becomes involved with a deaf murder suspect in the BBC2/Blast Films production Soundproof and Julia Davis for her portrayal of '60s TV cook Fanny Cradock in BBC4 drama Fear of Fanny.

Jim Broadbent's portrayal of the British peer who attempted to befriend Moors murderer Myra Hindley in Longford, a Granada/HBO production for Channel 4, will compete for best actor against Philip Glenister in Life on Mars and Michael Sheen for his role in Kenneth Williams biopic Fantabulosa.

Controversial Channel 4 drama Death of a President will compete for the best digital channel program against BBC3 classical music extravaganza Manchester Passion and BBC4 entertainment show Charlie Brooker's Screen Wipe.

Doctor Who, Life on Mars and The Street are in competition for the best drama series award, while in the international category the HBO-produced Baghdad E.R. takes on Entourage and Canal Plus-produced Spiral.

Oscar reactions: 'My heart started thumping!'

"What a fucking day!" said Guillermo Del Toro, whose "Pan's Labyrinth" scored six nominations. "I woke up without my glasses at what I believed was 5:15. I said, 'Holy crap, it's 5:15!' I ran downstairs, and of course, it was 3:30," he said. "I browsed cable and found Peckinpah's 'Wild Bunch.' This was a blessing. I stayed with Peckinpah until the nominations. And when I heard them, I tell you, there has never been so much love in that sofa than this morning." "Labyrinth" managed quite a haul, an amazing amount for a movie that was released so late in the year. Del Toro said had it been released earlier, the score might have been different, "but the beauty of it is, whoever saw it at the time certainly loved it enough to produce this variety of nominations. What I find beautiful is whoever was touched by the movie came forth and said it in a loud voice." Del Toro, too, is touched that a movie that was so difficult to make is getting so much love. "The financing collapsed twice, most everybody in my camp was telling me to drop it," he said. "And I'm glad I stuck with it with my friends Alfonso (Cuaron), Bertha Navarro) and Frida Torresblanco). We co-produced this movie with Spain through sheer will. It was not business as usual making it."

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There may be no typical way to receive notification that you have received a best actress Oscar nomination, but Helen Mirren discovered that she had been tapped for "The Queen" in "a most extraordinary way!" While waiting on hold for an interview with NBC's "Today" show during a break between filming scenes for Iain Softley's "Inkheart", she was listening to the live feed of nominations and unknowingly came in during the middle of best supporting actress. Not hearing her name, she said, "I figured they were going to come on the line and say, 'Sorry, Ms. Mirren, we're not interested now.' But then I heard the actual announcement, literally live on television. I'd been cool until that point, but my heart started thumping." Talk about timing. Mirren, who this month won the Golden Globe for her titular role in "Queen" and another for HBO's "Elizabeth I", also was a front-runner for her PBS miniseries "Prime Suspect: The Final Act" this year. "It was exhausting", she recalls of having to do all three roles in one year. "It was basically 10 hours of lead role acting onscreen, which is very demanding. It was just as well that when I got to do 'Prime Suspect' I had to play a sad old drunk -- that was about as much as I could manage at that point." Overall, she said she is thrilled with the fact that "Queen" received six Oscar nominations. "It is very gratifying to have the whole film recognized," she said. But there was one person who wasn't quite ready to recognize Mirren's nomination -- her husband, director Taylor Hackford, was still asleep when she called him first with the good news. "I woke him up", she said tenderly. "And I said, Hello, darling. He said, 'Do you know what time it is?' He had forgotten what day it was."

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"Babel" director-producer Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu was forced to celebrate the film's seven nominations, including a best helmer mention, in silence. "My kids are sick with the flu", said Gonzalez Inarritu, who watched the early-morning telecast at home with his wife. "We jumped, but we couldn't shout. So it was a strange, quiet celebration. But I woke them up later to tell them the news. After all, the film is dedicated to them." As for the unconventional, global-minded film's appeal to Academy voters, Gonzalez Inarritu said, "I think there is more of an open attitude nowadays," he said. "It's been an incredible year for international filmmakers."

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Penelope Cruz wasn't about to let her first Academy Award nomination get in the way of a good night's sleep. "I went to sleep at 10, but then something woke me up," said Cruz, who was singled out for her starring role in "Volver". "I was nervous, but I didn't want to admit it." The Spanish actress finally awoke to the sounds of the TV set in another room. My father yelled, 'Stop pretending you are sleeping and come out here, ' " she said. "I was very excited. I was crying and laughing at the same time." Still, the celebration was dampened by the fact that "Volver" helmer and Cruz's longtime collaborator, Pedro Almodovar, was shut out of the foreign-language and director categories. "I called him immediately, and he said from all of the nominations the film could have received, he was the happiest about mine," said Cruz, who cites Almodovar as the reason she decided to become an actress.

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Stephen Frears learned of his Oscar nom for directing while at the Savoy Hotel in London, where he was honored in the feature film category by the South Bank Awards program for his work on "The Queen". "I'm just reeling", Frears said. "You don't make films in England with that kind of possibility. If you ran your life with the idea that this is going to happen, you'd go mad, but it's phenomenal. I've had a charmed (professional) life, and if this keeps it going on a bit longer, then I'm thrilled." Frears, nominated in 1990 for "The Grifters", said he had no idea "Queen" would attract such critical renown. "I was sent a good script, and I approached it like I direct anything, really," he said. "It's really hard to say why this one took off. You go to work, and I could see the talent was giving an extraordinary performance, but you still can't anticipate anything like this. It's quite bewildering, in the best sense of the word."

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"I woke up with my agent screaming in my ear," said "The Departed"'s Mark Wahlberg, who was in bed at his home in Los Angeles when his nomination for best supporting actor was announced. "I thought something terrible happened at first. We didn't think it was going to happen. I hoped it would happen." Wahlberg credits his "real-life experience" and being inside his "comfort zone" for the performance of his career in "Departed". "It was not a lot of preparation or learning lines," he said. "I came up with a lot of different ways to insult these guys. I spent a good part of my childhood getting in trouble with the Boston police. I had the accent. Marty encouraged me and gave me the freedom to say what I wanted. He knew I was familiar with that world. Having that freedom, having him on the other side of the camera, and making a movie inside my comfort zone, I had to pinch myself that it was real." Wahlberg said he also had inspiration from the colorful language he heard at home. "My mother liked to drop the F-bomb, all in terms of affection where I come from," he said. "After I was nominated for the Globe, my mom called in tears. When she told my dad, he started screaming in the background that I had won the Academy Award. So today my dad said, 'Again? Now we can call you a professional actor.' He was never impressed with my paychecks. It was amazing to see how proud they were."

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It might not be yellow, but Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton celebrated in true "Little Miss Sunshine" fashion -- driving in their van. The married directing duo were taking their kids to school -- three children, two stops -- and doing media interviews simultaneously. They might not have scored a directing nom, but they still were thrilled that "Sunshine" earned mentions for best picture, supporting actor (Alan Arkin) and supporting actress (Abigail Breslin). Still, their celebrating will be put on hold because they are busy putting together their next project, "The Abstinence Teacher", for Warner Independent Pictures. "The benefit of the deal taking so long is maybe our price went up," Faris joked. The two are shocked, though, that a comedy was nominated among a slew of dramas. "People refer to it as a comedy, but what we love about it is the emotional component. We think audiences connected to that," Dayton said. Added Faris: "Everybody knows what it's like to be a member of a family. It's a familiar subject that everyone can relate to in some way."

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In the wake of "The Departed"'s five nominations, including one for best director, Martin Scorsese said, "I am very pleased that 'The Departed' has been honored with five nominations for this year's Academy Awards. I am particularly happy that the hard work of the entire cast and crew has been rewarded with a best picture nomination and that the specific contributions of Mark Wahlberg, our screenwriter William Monahan and my longtime editor Thelma Schoonmaker have been recognized with nominations as well."

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"I don't know what to do with myself," yelled "Little Children" best actress nominee Kate Winslet. "I'm pacing and screaming and laughing and crying. I'm so thrilled, I really am. I did not expect it. I was all ready to not get a nomination at all." This is Winslet's fifth nomination, and the bloom is still on the rose. "We're talking about the Academy Awards! That could never be old hat." Winslet was in between dropping off her daughter and son at their respective schools in New York when she received her first call, from husband Sam Mendes; the director was in London. "Literally as I jumped into the car my phone rang, and it was Sam. I exploded into this ridiculous display of whooping and screaming. My poor son could not work out what the hell was going on. " 'Mommy what is it, what is it?' " she said. Winslet was especially pleased with fellow actor Jackie Earle Haley's nomination. "I have to call him", she said. "You have no idea how much this is going to literally change his life. Not as an actor, but also as a person. He didn't work for 15 years, you know." And though Todd Field might not have received a nomination for directing -- Field and Tom Perrotta did nab a nom for adapted screenplay -- Winslet said, "If it weren't for Todd, Jackie and I would not have received these nominations. This whole movie was to Todd's vision. So I do feel that Todd has been acknowledged in some way."

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Leonardo DiCaprio got the news of his nomination for "Blood Diamond" in London, where he took a break from doing press interviews for the movie to watch the nominations announcement live. He has been on an international press tour on behalf of "Diamond" and "The Departed". The day after the Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 15, he flew to Tokyo with Martin Scorsese to premiere "Departed"; then, he jetted to London with Djimon Hounsou and director Edward Zwick to promote "Diamond", which premiered there Tuesday night. After London comes Rome and Madrid. "I'm honored to receive this nomination from the Academy -- especially in a year full of such worthy nominees," DiCaprio said. "I'm grateful to everyone who has supported 'Blood Diamond.' Being nominated is a tribute to everyone who worked on this film, especially Ed Zwick. I am also thrilled for Djimon, Mark (Wahlberg) and Marty, who are all so deserving of this recognition."

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Forest Whitaker is a great champion of "The Last King of Scotland". The reflective actor, who received his first Oscar nomination for his role as Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, was trudging through New York, booking appearances on "Today" and "Late Show With David Letterman" to promote the movie that bowed at the end of September but has been rereleased to capitalize on the recognition for his performance. "This is an amazing time and an amazing moment," said Whitaker, a frequent meditator who had to use moments in the taxi to center himself. As for celebration, Whitaker plans to do some dining, dancing and toasting with his wife, who joined him on his New York media tour.

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"I'm very pleased. I'm in frighteningly good company," Judi Dench said of her nomination as best actress for playing a jealous spinster in "Notes on a Scandal". "It was one of the harder parts I have played. At the end of the day, I was quite glad to get back to the person I am. I had the power to do it because of (director) Richard Eyre. He steered me through the rougher waters of it."

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Because his best actor nomination for "Venus" represents his eighth nomination in the category, Peter O'Toole, who has never won an acting Oscar -- though he was tapped for an honorary award in 2003 -- said, "If you fail the first time, try, try, try, try, try, try, try again. Yoiks!"

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He's thrilled on the inside, but Ryan Gosling is definitely taking a low-key approach to being nominated as best actor for his turn in ThinkFilm's "Half Nelson". "I was a big petitioner for the 'don't be too disappointed' club," he said. "I was calling everyone around me and saying, 'Don't be disappointed when I don't get nominated.' " He was even calling to make his manager feel better first thing this morning when he imagined that the nominations had been read and his name wasn't on the list. While they were on the phone, she told him they had just read his name. "But before we could register, I heard this squeal and crash outside my window," he said, and went over to learn that a motorcycle cop had just been hit. "So I was watching this guy lying in the middle of the road and (being) loaded into an ambulance while I'm getting all these calls telling me congratulations. I didn't know what to feel or how to feel." Later, it turned out the officer had just broken his arm: "So it turned out to be an OK day for both of us." The truth is, though, Gosling said getting nominated "goes against my plan. I was planning on being ostracized," he said. "I was really going to show them. Now I'm in this strange position, and I got to prove some people right. I was tempted to make bets that it wasn't going to happen -- at least I could profit from this, somehow." When he got off the phone, Gosling said he was calling his mother back to warn her not to quit her day job or anything: "She might think we've won the lottery. I have to tell her, this is just an indie film. We're getting the (Oscar swag) basket, and that's it."

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Meryl Streep, who with her best actress nom for "The Devil Wears Prada" extended her record with a 14th nomination, said simply, "I am thrilled in a way that no one can possibly imagine. It's extraordinary that anyone in the actor's branch is even speaking to me, never mind nominating me yet again. I'm very, very grateful."

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Will Smith was in New York working on "I Am Legend" when he received word of his nomination as best actor for "The Pursuit of Happyness". "Congratulations to all of the nominees," he said in a statement. "It is a great honor to be considered among this caliber of performers. No competition, all celebration. Let the parties begin."

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Djimon Hounsou was in a London hotel room taking a break from doing a press junket with some of the cast and crew of "Blood Diamond" when the nominations were announced on television. "We were having lunch, and we didn't realize that the actual nominations were being announced, and we started hearing the nominations live," he said. "Everyone was screaming" when they heard his name for actor in a supporting role, he said. It was a fitting reward for a tough job. "It was a very hard shoot, physically and emotionally," Hounsou said. "Everything was hard. For me personally, everything was difficult." Hounsou did not meet any actual diamond workers because the shoot took place in Mozambique and South Africa, not in Sierra Leone, where the movie is set. He has, however, bought diamonds. But next time he does, he said, "I would certainly ask the right questions to whoever the vendor is about their policy on conflict diamonds."

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"Babel"'s Rinko Kikuchi was attending a Chanel fashion show in Paris when her manager relayed the news of her best supporting actress nomination.

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles in Globe noms

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles in Globe noms
COMPLETE COVERAGE:

List of nominees

Film nominees react

Risky Business: Anne Thompson's take

Grove: Votes impact Oscar coin

TV noms: 'Grey's' a top Globe contender

The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. doubled down on Clint Eastwood and Leonardo DiCaprio on Thursday as it announced nominations for the 64th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton.

With seven nominations, Babel was the most-nominated film, followed by The Departed with six and Dreamgirls with five. In the television categories, the drama Grey's Anatomy and the comedy Weeds were the most nominated series, with four each.

Eastwood received two nominations in the same category, picking up noms as best director for his bookend films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters From Iwo Jima. DiCaprio also twice scored in one same category, dominating the list for best dramatic actor with noms for his work as a Boston undercover cop in The Departed and a South African mercenary in Blood Diamond.

Helen Mirren did them one better. Not only did she receive two nominations in the category of best performance by an actress in a miniseries -- for Elizabeth I and Prime Suspect: The Final Act -- but she was gifted with a third nom, as best motion picture actress for portraying Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen.

For all their love of Eastwood, though, the 83 voting members of the HFPA did not nominate Flags as best drama. They spread their noms among Babel, Bobby, Departed, Little Children and Queen.

For best motion picture comedy or musical, the noms went to Borat, The Devil Wears Prada, Dreamgirls, Little Miss Sunshine and Thank You for Smoking.

Joining Eastwood as best director nominees are Stephen Frears for Queen, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu for Babel and Martin Scorsese for Departed. Despite its five nominations, Dreamgirls failed to earn a nomination for its director, Bill Condon, who may have been edged aside by the dual Eastwood noms.

As if offering an antidote to Babel, a globe-trotting tale of cultural misunderstandings, the nominations themselves took on a multicultural hue. Babel supporting actresses Adriana Barraza, who hails from Mexico, and Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi were invited to the Globes' annual party, to be held Jan. 15 at the Beverly Hilton and broadcast live by NBC. London-born comedian Sacha Baron Cohen crashed the best actor in a comedy lineup with his alter ego, Kazakh journalist Borat Sagdiyev. And the circle of nominated composers read like a survey of world music with the French-born Alexandre Desplat (The Painted Veil), British-born Clint Mansell (The Fountain), Argentinean Gustavo Santaolalla (Babel), Italian Carlo Siliotto (Nomad) and German-born Hans Zimmer (The Da Vinci Code).

A strong streak of Anglophilia also carried through the nominations. In the best dramatic actress heat, for example, American Maggie Gyllenhaal, who stars as an ex-con trying to re-establish her life in Sherrybaby, and the Spanish-born Penelope Cruz, playing a resilient widow in Volver, are pitted against such formidable British talent as Judi Dench, who portrays a repressed schoolteacher in Notes on a Scandal; Kate Winslet, who plays an adulterous suburbanite in Little Children; and Mirren in Queen.

In addition to DiCaprio, the best actor nominees are Peter O'Toole, earning his 10th Globe nomination by playing an aging rogue in Venus; Will Smith, for portraying a struggling dad in The Pursuit of Happyness; and Forest Whitaker, who stars as the mercurial Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

In the best actress in a comedy or musical category, the nominees are Annette Bening, who plays an unstable mom in Running With Scissors; Toni Collette, the long-suffering wife in Little Miss Sunshine; Beyonce Knowles, who portrays a rising recording star in Dreamgirls; Meryl Streep, for her turn as a fearsome magazine editor in Prada; and Renee Zellweger, who plays author Beatrix Potter in Miss Potter.

Collette picked up a second nomination as TV supporting actress for Tsunami: The Aftermath, and Knowles joined the pack of double nominees because she also shares in the composing credits for best song nominee Listen from Dreamgirls.

For best actor in a comedy or musical, the HFPA nominated Baron Cohen; Johnny Depp, scoring his second Globe nomination for playing Jack Sparrow, this time for "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest"; Aaron Eckhart, who appears as a tobacco lobbyist in Thank You for Smoking; Will Ferrell, who plays a man whose life unfolds like a novel in Stranger Than Fiction; and in what amounted to a surprise choice, Chiwetel Ejiofor, who dresses up as a London drag queen in Kinky Boots. Like Collette, Ejiofor picked up a second nomination for Tsunami, for which he earned a best actor in a TV miniseries nom.

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles in Globe noms

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles in Globe noms
COMPLETE COVERAGE:

List of nominees

Film nominees react

Risky Business: Anne Thompson's take

Grove: Votes impact Oscar coin

TV noms: 'Grey's' a top Globe contender

The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. doubled down on Clint Eastwood and Leonardo DiCaprio on Thursday as it announced nominations for the 64th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton.

With seven nominations, Babel was the most-nominated film, followed by The Departed with six and Dreamgirls with five. In the television categories, the drama Grey's Anatomy and the comedy Weeds were the most nominated series, with four each.

Eastwood received two nominations in the same category, picking up noms as best director for his bookend films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters From Iwo Jima. DiCaprio also twice scored in one same category, dominating the list for best dramatic actor with noms for his work as a Boston undercover cop in The Departed and a South African mercenary in Blood Diamond.

Helen Mirren did them one better. Not only did she receive two nominations in the category of best performance by an actress in a miniseries -- for Elizabeth I and Prime Suspect: The Final Act -- but she was gifted with a third nom, as best motion picture actress for portraying Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen.

For all their love of Eastwood, though, the 83 voting members of the HFPA did not nominate Flags as best drama. They spread their noms among Babel, Bobby, Departed, Little Children and Queen.

For best motion picture comedy or musical, the noms went to Borat, The Devil Wears Prada, Dreamgirls, Little Miss Sunshine and Thank You for Smoking.

Joining Eastwood as best director nominees are Stephen Frears for Queen, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu for Babel and Martin Scorsese for Departed. Despite its five nominations, Dreamgirls failed to earn a nomination for its director, Bill Condon, who may have been edged aside by the dual Eastwood noms.

As if offering an antidote to Babel, a globe-trotting tale of cultural misunderstandings, the nominations themselves took on a multicultural hue. Babel supporting actresses Adriana Barraza, who hails from Mexico, and Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi were invited to the Globes' annual party, to be held Jan. 15 at the Beverly Hilton and broadcast live by NBC. London-born comedian Sacha Baron Cohen crashed the best actor in a comedy lineup with his alter ego, Kazakh journalist Borat Sagdiyev. And the circle of nominated composers read like a survey of world music with the French-born Alexandre Desplat (The Painted Veil), British-born Clint Mansell (The Fountain), Argentinean Gustavo Santaolalla (Babel), Italian Carlo Siliotto (Nomad) and German-born Hans Zimmer (The Da Vinci Code).

A strong streak of Anglophilia also carried through the nominations. In the best dramatic actress heat, for example, American Maggie Gyllenhaal, who stars as an ex-con trying to re-establish her life in Sherrybaby, and the Spanish-born Penelope Cruz, playing a resilient widow in Volver, are pitted against such formidable British talent as Judi Dench, who portrays a repressed schoolteacher in Notes on a Scandal; Kate Winslet, who plays an adulterous suburbanite in Little Children; and Mirren in Queen.

In addition to DiCaprio, the best actor nominees are Peter O'Toole, earning his 10th Globe nomination by playing an aging rogue in Venus; Will Smith, for portraying a struggling dad in The Pursuit of Happyness; and Forest Whitaker, who stars as the mercurial Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

In the best actress in a comedy or musical category, the nominees are Annette Bening, who plays an unstable mom in Running With Scissors; Toni Collette, the long-suffering wife in Little Miss Sunshine; Beyonce Knowles, who portrays a rising recording star in Dreamgirls; Meryl Streep, for her turn as a fearsome magazine editor in Prada; and Renee Zellweger, who plays author Beatrix Potter in Miss Potter.

Collette picked up a second nomination as TV supporting actress for Tsunami: The Aftermath, and Knowles joined the pack of double nominees because she also shares in the composing credits for best song nominee Listen from Dreamgirls.

For best actor in a comedy or musical, the HFPA nominated Baron Cohen; Johnny Depp, scoring his second Globe nomination for playing Jack Sparrow, this time for "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest"; Aaron Eckhart, who appears as a tobacco lobbyist in Thank You for Smoking; Will Ferrell, who plays a man whose life unfolds like a novel in Stranger Than Fiction; and in what amounted to a surprise choice, Chiwetel Ejiofor, who dresses up as a London drag queen in Kinky Boots. Like Collette, Ejiofor picked up a second nomination for Tsunami, for which he earned a best actor in a TV miniseries nom.

'Babel' Towers Over Rivals in Golden Globe Noms

  • WENN
'Babel' Towers Over Rivals in Golden Globe Noms
Ensemble drama Babel leads the nominations at next year's Golden Globe Awards, boasting seven nods including Best Dramatic Picture and an acting accolade for star Brad Pitt. The film, spanning several countries telling four inter-related stories, sees Pitt praised in the Best Actor In A Supporting Role category. He'll battle it out alongside Ben Affleck (Hollywoodland) and Eddie Murphy (Dreamgirls), as well as The Departed co-stars Jack Nicholson and Mark Wahlberg. The mob thriller earned a total of six nominations yesterday. Babel's Rinko Kikuchi and Adriana Barraza also received supporting acting nods, along with Cate Blanchett for Notes On A Scandal, Emily Blunt for The Devil Wears Prada and Jennifer Hudson for Dreamgirls. But it's Leonardo DiCaprio who looks most likely to convert an acting nomination into a trophy after being named twice in the Best Actor category. His performances in The Departed and Blood Diamond are up against Peter O'Toole's in Venus, Will Smith's in The Pursuit Of Happyness and Forest Whitaker's portrayal of former Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King Of Scotland. Actor-turned-director Clint Eastwood is another star with a double reason to celebrate - Flags Of Our Fathers competes against his other war film Letters From Iwo Jima in the Best Director category. Meanwhile, Dame Helen Mirren stands to win three awards at the star-studded Hollywood ceremony next month. Her role as monarch-in-crisis Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen pits her against another veteran British actress, Dame Judi Dench, for Notes On A Scandal. Penelope Cruz is also a strong contender for Best Actress in Volver, as well Maggie Gyllenhaal (SherryBaby) and Kate Winslet in the suburban drama Little Children. Mirren's other nods are for small screen work - her roles in Prime Suspect: The Final Act and period piece Elizabeth I could see her pick up a Best Actress In A Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made For Television.

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles in Globe noms

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles in Globe noms
The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. doubled down on Clint Eastwood and Leonardo DiCaprio on Thursday as it announced nominations for the 64th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton.

With seven nominations, Babel was the most-nominated film, followed by The Departed with six and Dreamgirls with five. In the television categories, the drama Grey's Anatomy and the comedy Weeds were the most nominated series, with four each.

Eastwood received two nominations in the same category, picking up noms as best director for his bookend films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters From Iwo Jima. DiCaprio also twice scored in one same category, dominating the list for best dramatic actor with noms for his work as a Boston undercover cop in The Departed and a South African mercenary in Blood Diamond.

Helen Mirren did them one better. Not only did she receive two nominations in the category of best performance by an actress in a miniseries -- for Elizabeth I and Prime Suspect: The Final Act -- but she was gifted with a third nom, as best motion picture actress for portraying Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen.

For all their love of Eastwood, though, the 83 voting members of the HFPA did not nominate Flags as best drama. They spread their noms among Babel, Bobby, Departed, Little Children and Queen.

For best motion picture comedy or musical, the noms went to Borat, The Devil Wears Prada, Dreamgirls, Little Miss Sunshine and Thank You for Smoking.

Joining Eastwood as best director nominees are Stephen Frears for Queen, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu for Babel and Martin Scorsese for Departed. Despite its five nominations, Dreamgirls failed to earn a nomination for its director, Bill Condon, who may have been edged aside by the dual Eastwood noms.

As if offering an antidote to Babel, a globe-trotting tale of cultural misunderstandings, the nominations themselves took on a multicultural hue. Babel supporting actresses Adriana Barraza, who hails from Mexico, and Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi were invited to the Globes' annual party, to be held Jan. 15 at the Beverly Hilton and broadcast live by NBC. London-born comedian Sacha Baron Cohen crashed the best actor in a comedy lineup with his alter ego, Kazakh journalist Borat Sagdiyev. And the circle of nominated composers read like a survey of world music with the French-born Alexandre Desplat (The Painted Veil), British-born Clint Mansell (The Fountain), Argentinean Gustavo Santaolalla (Babel), Italian Carlo Siliotto (Nomad) and German-born Hans Zimmer (The Da Vinci Code).

A strong streak of Anglophilia also carried through the nominations. In the best dramatic actress heat, for example, American Maggie Gyllenhaal, who stars as an ex-con trying to re-establish her life in Sherrybaby, and the Spanish-born Penelope Cruz, playing a resilient widow in Volver, are pitted against such formidable British talent as Judi Dench, who portrays a repressed schoolteacher in Notes on a Scandal; Kate Winslet, who plays an adulterous suburbanite in Little Children; and Mirren in Queen.

In addition to DiCaprio, the best actor nominees are Peter O'Toole, earning his 10th Globe nomination by playing an aging rogue in Venus; Will Smith, for portraying a struggling dad in The Pursuit of Happyness; and Forest Whitaker, who stars as the mercurial Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

In the best actress in a comedy or musical category, the nominees are Annette Bening, who plays an unstable mom in Running With Scissors; Toni Collette, the long-suffering wife in Little Miss Sunshine; Beyonce Knowles, who portrays a rising recording star in Dreamgirls; Meryl Streep, for her turn as a fearsome magazine editor in Prada; and Renee Zellweger, who plays author Beatrix Potter in Miss Potter.

Collette picked up a second nomination as TV supporting actress for Tsunami: The Aftermath, and Knowles joined the pack of double nominees because she also shares in the composing credits for best song nominee Listen from Dreamgirls.

For best actor in a comedy or musical, the HFPA nominated Baron Cohen; Johnny Depp, scoring his second Globe nomination for playing Jack Sparrow, this time for "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest"; Aaron Eckhart, who appears as a tobacco lobbyist in Thank You for Smoking; Will Ferrell, who plays a man whose life unfolds like a novel in Stranger Than Fiction; and in what amounted to a surprise choice, Chiwetel Ejiofor, who dresses up as a London drag queen in Kinky Boots. Like Collette, Ejiofor picked up a second nomination for Tsunami, for which he earned a best actor in a TV miniseries nom.

COMPLETE COVERAGE:

List of nominees

Film nominees react

Risky Business: Anne Thompson's take

Grove: Votes impact Oscar coin

TV noms: 'Grey's' a top Globe contender

See also

External Sites