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Bright Star (2009)

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The three-year romance between 19th-century poet John Keats and Fanny Brawne near the end of his life.

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, (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 16 wins & 52 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Mr. Brown
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Toots
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Samuel
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Maria Dilke
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Reynolds
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Reynolds Sister
Lucinda Raikes ...
Reynolds Sister
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Mr. Severn
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Mr. Hunt
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Storyline

It's 1818 in Hampstead Village on the outskirts of London. Poet Charles Brown lives in one half of a house, the Dilkes family who live in the other half. Through their association with the Dilkes, the fatherless Brawne family know Mr. Brown. The Brawne's eldest daughter, Fanny Brawne, and Mr. Brown don't like each other. She thinks he's arrogant and rude, and he feels that she is pretentious, knowing only how to sew (admittedly well as she makes all her own fashionable clothes), flirt and give opinions on subjects about which she knows nothing. Insecure struggling poet John Keats comes to live with his friend, Mr. Brown. Miss Brawne and Mr. Keats have a mutual attraction to each other, a relationship which however is slow to develop in part since Mr. Brown does whatever he can to keep the two apart. But other obstacles face the couple, including their eventual overwhelming passion for each other clouding their view of what the other does, Mr. Keats' struggling career which offers him ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A thing of beauty is a joy forever. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic elements, some sensuality, brief language and incidental smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

9 October 2009 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Bright Star - Estrela Cintilante  »

Box Office

Budget:

$8,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$189,703 (USA) (18 September 2009)

Gross:

$4,440,055 (USA) (4 December 2009)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

French visa # 123588. See more »

Goofs

When Abigail is showing off her new baby to the Brawnes, Brown goes to talk to Fanny in the next room. Abigail comes in holding her baby, its head rested in one crook of her arm. In the next shot when she turns and leaves, the baby has flipped so its head is on the opposite side of her. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[general chatter]
Mrs. Brawne: Hello, Joy.
Dilke Maid: Hello.
Mrs. Brawne: Is all well?
Dilke Maid: Very good, thank you.
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Crazy Credits

Ben Whishaw recites Keats' "Ode to a Nightingale" over the closing credits. See more »


Soundtracks

Serenade in B flat, K361, Adagio
(1781)
Written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (as Mozart)
Arranged by Mark Bradshaw
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Beautiful in the rarest of ways
10 September 2009 | by (Hollywood, California) – See all my reviews

With such high hopes for a film, a letdown is always lurking the depths of your mind, but in this case, Campion far exceeded my exceptions. Never could I have predicted the deep, meticulously crafted scenes, led so strongly by Abbie Cornish playing Fanny. The heartwrenching emotion in this movie was unlike any other; there has never been a more real portrayal of the most simplistic yet most common emotions that rule the heart. Campion went far beyond the usual "I am deeply in love; Now I am sad" and truly captured human idiosyncrasy as she delved into the illogical, irrational minds of two young and suddenly in love individuals. At times, it was almost too much to bear due to how intensely palpable the sadness was. To some, certain scenes or moments may have seemed a little longer than usual, but completely necessary is the silence, just as much as the dialogue. This film perfectly embodied how a simple, real, profound story should be told.

If the above were not enough to drive this movie on, the aesthetics were nothing short of spectacular. Each stitch in Fanny's sewing was as beautiful as each scene in a field of lavender or room flooded with butterflies. The magnificent settings, costumes, and natural sunshine pouring into a perfectly decorated room felt not contrived, but simply like a very real dream. As the curtains in Fanny's room got caught in the breeze, it was as if you felt it cooling you down ever so slightly as her content emotion overtook your mind.

Ben Whishaw, too, was superb: perfectly embodying the fragile, wondrous poet that was John Keats, so full of tender emotion. Fanny's younger sister was another beautiful element of this film and really stole the show in her own right with her hilarious and endearing perception of life in general. Each character and each line spoken brought something so special to the story. As much witty humor as there was aching sorrow, this movie is not one to be missed.


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