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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 44 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer’ Trailer Makes Ellie Goulding’s “Burn” Super Creepy

16 August 2017 6:43 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

A24 has released The Killing of a Sacred Deer trailer. Yorgos Lanthimos’ film stars Colin Farrell as a top cardiologist who has a twisted relationship with a young man (Barry Keoghan) that threatens his family and career. Of course, that’s just the tip of the iceberg in a movie that Gregory Ellwood compared to Michael Haneke’s Funny Games in his glowing review from Cannes. Here’s an excerpt: In many ways, this is Lanthimos’ own variation of Michael Haneke’s Funny Games, a shocking morality play where there is no control, no easy choices and no happy ending. … »

- Matt Goldberg

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New to Streaming: ‘Alien: Covenant,’ ‘Shin Godzilla,’ ‘Adaptation,’ ‘Slack Bay,’ and More

4 August 2017 5:24 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Adaptation (Spike Jonze)

It’s almost depressing to rewatch Adaptation in 2016, because it’s a reminder of how strong an actor Nicolas Cage is when he actually invests himself in good projects. It was soon after this that his career went off the rails, but he’s remarkably impressive here, playing the dual roles of Charlie Kaufman and his fictional twin brother, Donald. As much a mind-fuck as any other Kaufman screenplay, »

- Jordan Raup

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Criterion Collection: L’Argent | Blu-ray Review

1 August 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

In more ways than one, L’Argent, the stunning final film of Robert Bresson, (anointed ‘patron saint of cinema’), plays like an eerie prequel to the screaming agony of Michael Haneke’s Funny Games (1997).

Continue reading »

- Nicholas Bell

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9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’

24 July 2017 8:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Netflix may have cancelled the Wachowski’s cult hit “Sense 8,” but its adding two of their defining works to its streaming library next month. All three entries in “The Matrix” trilogy are heading to Netflix, as is the ambitious “Cloud Atlas,” which means you’ll be able to bring summer to an end by bingeing mind-melting science fiction.

Read More: Netflix Is Not the Problem: Why Bad Theatrical Presentations Are Destroying the Experience

Other titles joining the streaming service include underrated gems from Quentin Tarantino and Michael Haneke, plus two of the year’s most exciting documentary films. Check out a complete list of all the new movies joining Netflix in August 2017 below, including our 7 must-binge choices.

The Matrix” Trilogy (August 1)

August kicks off with “The Matrix,” “The Matrix Reloaded” and “The Matrix Revolutions” all becoming available to stream on Netflix. Say what you want about the two sequels, but »

- Zack Sharf

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Comic-Con 2017: First Trailer for Call Of Duty: WWII – Nazi Zombies, Featuring David Tennant & Ving Rhames

20 July 2017 4:58 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Ahead of its launch this November, Call of Duty: WWII - Nazi Zombies is teased in a new trailer unleashed by Activision at Comic-Con, with a cast of voice actors that includes David Tennant and zombie slayer extraordinaire, Ving Rhames:

Press Release: Santa Monica, Calif. – July 20, 2017 – An all-new, twisted take on Activision’s Call of Dutyzombies co-op mode is here.  Call of Duty®: WWII - Nazi Zombies, a chilling, dark vision of undead horror, was revealed today at San Diego Comic Con alongside members of its all-star cast of characters, which in full includes David Tennant, Elodie Yung, Katheryn Winnick, Udo Kier and Ving Rhames.  Launching on November 3 as part of Call of Duty: WWII, the Nazi Zombies cooperative mode delivers a sinister original story from Sledgehammer Games, delivering a new definition of terror to Call of Duty zombies.

“With Nazi Zombies, we’re creating a frightening world »

- Derek Anderson

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‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Directed His Own Disturbing Version Of Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’

17 July 2017 8:56 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Some of the most memorable scenes in “Twin Peaks: The Return” have found David Lynch revisiting the experimental highs of his most radical film work. Cooper’s strange trip in Episode 3 was a return to the sound and fury of “Eraserhead” and “Inland Empire,” while the sight of the camera looking down at Amanda Seyfried’s glowing Becky Burnett in Part 5 recalled the delirium of “Mulholland Drive.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Part 8 Was the Closest We’ll Come to Seeing David Lynch’s ‘Tree of Life’

But the series’ boldest moments have occurred when Lynch has infused his own dark style with the most iconic cinema ever made. That was certainly what happened in the legendary Part 8, in which the director channeled his inner Terrence Malick to tell the wordless origin story of evil (IndieWire called the scene “the closest we’ll ever come to seeing David Lynch’s »

- Zack Sharf

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‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Directed His Own Disturbing Version Of Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’

17 July 2017 8:56 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Some of the most memorable scenes in “Twin Peaks: The Return” have found David Lynch revisiting the experimental highs of his most radical film work. Cooper’s strange trip in Episode 3 was a return to the sound and fury of “Eraserhead” and “Inland Empire,” while the sight of the camera looking down at Amanda Seyfried’s glowing Becky Burnett in Part 5 recalled the delirium of “Mulholland Drive.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Part 8 Was the Closest We’ll Come to Seeing David Lynch’s ‘Tree of Life’

But the series’ boldest moments have occurred when Lynch has infused his own dark style with the most iconic cinema ever made. That was certainly what happened in the legendary Part 8, in which the director channeled his inner Terrence Malick to tell the wordless origin story of evil (IndieWire called the scene “the closest we’ll ever come to seeing David Lynch’s »

- Zack Sharf

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In the city of the world's desire by Anne-Katrin Titze

27 June 2017 9:08 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

KEDi director Ceyda Torun: "Cats are so omnipresent." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

There are film cat people such as Michael Haneke seen in Yves Montmayeur's Michael H - Profession: Director with Yves' cat Félix, Isabelle Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle and Mia Hansen-Løve's Things To Come, Céline's Bébert in Emmanuel Bourdieu's Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Robert De Niro with Lil Bub of Andy Capper and Juliette Eisner's Lil Bub & Friendz at the Tribeca Film Festival and then there is Ceyda Torun's sharp-eyed documentary KEDi with Istanbul as cat central.

Duman has an unforgettable style of scoring little plates of smoked turkey and slices of Manchego cheese

In 2008 at the Museum of Modern Art for Funny Games (starring Naomi Watts, Tim Roth, Michael Pitt, Brady Corbet), when Michael Haneke was asked by Ed Bahlman if he had any pets, he stated that he is "a cat person. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Film Review: ‘Chameleon’

17 June 2017 2:52 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Enigmatic “Chameleon” is a minimalist psychological thriller in which a seemingly benign visitor to a well-off lesbian couple’s home turns out to have very sinister intentions. Stingy on conventional thrills, and pretty murky in terms of psychology as well, Jorge Riquelme Serrano’s debut feature is a precisely engineered chamber piece that will sharply divide audiences with both its coolly distanced style and incendiary yet somewhat baffling content.

While some may admire its Haneke-like dispassion amid increasingly alarming events, others may find the element of class-warfare critique under-articulated, or experience the targeting of gay characters here as an expression of, rather than a commentary on, homophobia. Whatever their verdict, festivalgoers will have plenty to debate afterward. Mainstream viewers are likely to be few for an item that so deliberately eschews the standard satisfactions of a commercial suspense narrative.

After a brief, unpinnably weird prologue in which a young man »

- Dennis Harvey

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Second Opinion – Berlin Syndrome (2017)

3 June 2017 1:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Berlin Syndrome, 2017.

Directed by Cate Shortland

Starring Teresa Palmer, Max Riemelt, Lucie Aron, Matthias Habich, and Cem Tuncay.

Synopsis :

A passionate holiday romance becomes a nightmare when an Australian photo-journalist wakes up in a Berlin apartment and find herself unable to leave…

A film delivering an assured yet uncomplicated look at obsession and social dysfunction, Cate Shortland’s Berlin Syndrome showcases exactly what can go wrong with holiday romances. While the director of the excellent Lore does preside over a taut and emotionally draining story of stranger danger and abuse, it does not have as much success in originality or surprises. It goes over familiar ground to many abduction films (Room, Misery, Funny Games to name a few) but without the style and shock value of those features.

Following Australian photographer Clare (Teresa Palmer, Lights Out, Hacksaw Ridge) as she travels around Berlin on an extended break, we see »

- Robert W Monk

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Cannes 2017. Funny Games—Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”

30 May 2017 2:06 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos has a knack for creating hermetic, bleakly hilarious worlds. Returning to the Croisette this year with the The Killing of a Sacred Deer (his second film in English after The Lobster, which won the Grand Jury Prize in 2015), co-written with longtime collaborator Efthymis Filippou, Lanthimos renders a twisted suburban nightmare with the stuff of Hellenic myth. It's assaultive and deeply unpleasant, and nothing less than his Funny Games.On paper, that’s a supremely promising conceit—the visceral impact of Haneke’s brilliant assault refracted through Lanthimos’ distinct, absurdist sensibility. For all its potential, however, there’s an odd lack of urgency to the first hour, centered on the daily rhythms of Steven, a cardiologist and surgeon played by Colin Farrell (here jettisoning the memorable paunch of The Lobster). He talks with colleagues, does his daily rounds at the hospital, and goes home to his ophthalmologist »

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Cannes Review: ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer’ is Pure and Simple Sadism

22 May 2017 12:14 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With the successive features Dogtooth, Alps, and The Lobster, Yorgos Lanthimos seemed to be going down the same route as Wes Anderson, i.e. become one of those auteurs who refines rather than expands on his idiosyncrasies, making largely interchangeable films on an ever grander scale but with diminishing returns. In this regard, The Killing of a Sacred Deer represents a departure, venturing into genre territory previously uncharted by the director. Although a felicitous turn in principle, the dispiriting results suggest Lanthimos might have been better off staying on his original course after all.

It’s a pity, too, because for its first hour or so, The Killing of a Sacred Deer is extremely promising. Lanthimos creates a gripping and steadily intensifying sense of foreboding in depicting the professional and domestic life of his protagonist Steven (Colin Farrel), a successful heart surgeon with a picture-perfect family: beautiful wife Anna (Nicole Kidman) and two teenage children, »

- Giovanni Marchini Camia

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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer’

22 May 2017 4:23 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In Nara Park, Japan, spotted deer were long believed to possess divine properties. To cause the death of one, even by accident, was a capital offense. Halfway across the world, in ancient Greece, King Agamemnon learned this the hard way, invoking the wrath of the gods for killing one of Artemis’ beloved deer, for which he was obliged to sacrifice his own daughter, Iphigenia. The obvious lesson: Don’t kill deer. But what if the deed is already done? That’s the premise of “Dogtooth” director Yorgos Lanthimos’ latest ruthless allegory, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” which has nothing at all to do with wildlife, holy or otherwise — although it does feature two key scenes in which a hunting rifle plays a critical role.

The title is a metaphor, as is the film’s central dramatic predicament (Lanthimos goes out of his way to make sure we understand that, »

- Peter Debruge

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Happy End review – Michael Haneke's satanic soap opera of pure sociopathy

21 May 2017 2:11 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Austrian director returns to many of his classic themes in a stark, unforgiving and gripping satire on bourgeois Europeans and the people who serve them

Related: Napalm review – Claude Lanzmann's gripping account of erotic encounter in North Korea

It hardly needs saying that the adjective in the title is about as accurate as the one in Haneke’s Funny Games. Happy End is a satirical nightmare of haute-bourgeois European prosperity: as stark, brilliant and unforgiving as a halogen light. It is not a new direction for this film-maker, admittedly, but an existing direction pursued with the same dazzling inspiration as ever. It is also as gripping as a satanically inspired soap opera, a dynasty of lost souls.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

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17 Brilliant Horror Films That Debuted at Cannes: Stream all of the Screams

17 May 2017 9:38 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Cannes Film Festival doesn’t get its due as a platform for horror. But as this year’s festival begins, two of the most anticipated titles — Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and David Lynch’s new season of “Twin Peaks” — are artful interpretations of the genre. Several more buzzy entries are expected to be dark and dire, including Lynne Ramsey’s “You Were Never Really Here,” David Robert Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake,” and Jane Campion’s series “Top of the Lake: China Girl.”

Cannes’ love of the gothic is nothing new. The festival has long been a melting pot for bold visions, and this includes some of the world’s scariest films. From established risk-takers like Lars von Trier and Nicolas Winding Refn to once-green directors like Gaspar Noé and Sam Raimi, the strength of the talent has left some indelible impressions on the horror scene. »

- William Earl

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Robert Pattinson Will Rewrite His Career at Cannes, and 7 More Predictions About This Year’s Fest

16 May 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

While the Cannes Film Festival is the showboat film festival to end all festivals, all of that is a springboard for the talking. Talking about the movies, talking about the movie industry, talking about the talking. Last year, the talking points were the persistence of Kristen Stewart, Woody Allen and Ronan Farrow, auteurs like Jim Jarmusch and Nicolas Winding Refn, and women (or the lack thereof). This year, we’ve read the Croisette crystal ball for the conversations likely to dominate the festival in the days to come. This isn’t necessarily about must-see titles (we’ve got those covered here); these are the stories most likely to be heard beyond the Cannes bubble. Here’s a look at the news cycle to come.

Read More: The Potential Oscar Contenders at Cannes 2017: A Rundown

Nicole Kidman Takes Charge

If last year’s Cannes It Girl was brainy “Personal Shopper »

- Anne Thompson and Eric Kohn

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Robert Pattinson Will Rewrite His Career at Cannes, and 7 More Predictions About This Year’s Fest

16 May 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While the Cannes Film Festival is the showboat film festival to end all festivals, all of that is a springboard for the talking. Talking about the movies, talking about the movie industry, talking about the talking. Last year, the talking points were the persistence of Kristen Stewart, Woody Allen and Ronan Farrow, auteurs like Jim Jarmusch and Nicolas Winding Refn, and women (or the lack thereof). This year, we’ve read the Croisette crystal ball for the conversations likely to dominate the festival in the days to come. This isn’t necessarily about must-see titles (we’ve got those covered here); these are the stories most likely to be heard beyond the Cannes bubble. Here’s a look at the news cycle to come.

Read More: The Potential Oscar Contenders at Cannes 2017: A Rundown

Nicole Kidman Takes Charge

If last year’s Cannes It Girl was brainy “Personal Shopper »

- Anne Thompson and Eric Kohn

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Cannes: First Clip from Michael Haneke’s ‘Happy End’ Features a Very Unhappy Dinner Party — Watch

16 May 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When lauded Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke uses the word “happy” — especially when he uses it in the title of a film — it’s okay to not take it at face value. After all, this is the director behind such films as “The White Ribbon,” “Amour,” and “Funny Games.” He’s not really into “happy.” So buckle up for “Happy End”!

Haneke’s latest star-packed film — featuring new and returning talents like Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Fantine Harduin, Franz Rogowski, and Laura Verlinden — is bound for Cannes, where it will likely only continue to elevate his stature at a festival that has long adored his work.

Read More: Cannes 2017: 22 Films We Can’t Wait to See at This Year’s Festival

While we don’t know much about the film itself, Huppert (who previously starred in his “The Piano Teacher” and “Time of the Wolf”) did give THR »

- Kate Erbland

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The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Cinematographers and the Films that made them great

12 May 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Dave Roper

So, we come to the end of this particular series. We’ve covered a number of aspects of the creative input into film-making, including actors, actresses, writers composers, and directors (in two parts). We’ve stopped short of costume, make-up, special effects, art design and others, however our final stop is Cinematography. The Dop exerts plenty of influence over the look of the film. Yes, lighting, production design and the director’s vision are key too, but the consistency and persistence with which certain directors stick with and return to a trusted Dop shows just how much they contribute.

Darius KhondjiSeven

Seven has a unique visual aesthetic. Plenty of films have gone for the “always raining, always dark” approach, but contrast Seven with something like AvP: Requiem for a shining example of how hard it is to pull off effectively. And contrast is the word. Seven »

- Dave Roper

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Michael Haneke's "Happy End" Gives An Unhappy First Glance

3 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

With just about two weeks to go before its seaside premiere at the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival, the first image for Michael Haneke’s Happy End – his latest cold dose of cruel reality – has landed as hard as the realization that one day we will all die, and most likely alone. Of course, Haneke returns to Cannes this year a reigning champ, double-fisting Palmes d’Or after his last films to grace the Competition – The White Ribbon and Amour – emerged victorious. The question on many minds going into this year’s festival is whether he’ll win the top prize for a third time and break the all-time record he holds alongside fellow international auteurs Alf Sjöberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Bille August, Emir Kusturica, Shohei Imamura, the Dardennes brothers, and last year’s surprise winner Ken Loach.

Happy End reunites Haneke with two performers who have arguably given career-best »

- Daniel Crooke

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 44 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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