A family man (Badreya) opens an authentic Middle Eastern restaurant with his best friend, who's Jewish.

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(story), | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Mustafa Marzoke
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Fikry
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Murad
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Kate
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Sabir (as Al Faris)
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Omar Nasser
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Sam
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Agent Stevens
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Angela Jensen
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Dez
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American Safety director
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John Westerman
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David
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Leila Marzoke
Richard Chagoury ...
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Storyline

Summer in L.A., it's hot. Homeland Security has set the threat level at red; they're searching for several Arabs alleged to be terrorists. Mustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who runs a falafel shop, comes to the FBI's attention; they investigate him. He has other problems: his young teen son no longer wants to be a Muslim; his sister, a nurse, objects to Mustafa arranging her marriage to a cousin from Egypt. She has a non-Arab suitor of her own. Omar, an employee of Mustafa, is a struggling actor who doesn't want to play only terrorists. Mustafa hopes to open a real restaurant and has a potential partner in Sam, a Jew, whose family objects. What price the American dream? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, including some sexual references, and brief drug use
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Details

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Release Date:

14 November 2008 (Greece)  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,500,000 (estimated)
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User Reviews

 
Strong Characterizations - Unfocused Plot
3 May 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This movie attempts to tell the story of Arab-Americans living in post 9/11 Los Angeles. It is definitely a message film, and its commendable message is that Arabs are human beings just like anyone else, and that they are finding it particularly difficult to cope in the U.S. due to American fears of terrorism and stereotyping. Unfortunately, the message at times seems more important than the story, which is an amalgam of a wide variety of problems facing Arab-Americans today. Consequently, AmericanEast often feels more like a primer on the problems of Arab-Americans than an actual movie. This is best illustrated by one inadvertently humorous segment in which the history of Islam's interactions with the West is presented in a cartoon. Seemingly aimed at easily bored junior high school students, it would be best entitled "Middle East History for Super-Super Dummies" - i.e., typical young Americans. AmericanEast should be strongly praised for its many very real, well portrayed Arab-American characters. If only they were in the service of a more focused plot this would have been a fine film.


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