Carriers
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FAQ for
Carriers (2009) More at IMDbPro »

The content of this page was created directly by users and has not been screened or verified by IMDb staff.
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Carriers can be found here.

No. Carriers is based on a screenplay written by co-directors lex and David Pastor.

Post-apocalyptic movies are popular topics and have been so for over 60 years. Some, like Carriers, feature viruses, e.g.. The Last Man on Earth (1964) and its sequels The Omega Man (1971) and I Am Legend (2007). Viruses also destroy the world in The Stand (1994), 28 Days Later... (2002) and its sequel 28 Weeks Later (2007), Zombieland (2009), The Dead Outside (2008), and Resident Evil (2002) and its sequels Resident Evil: Extinction (2007), Resident Evil: Apocalypse (2004), and Resident Evil: Afterlife (2010). Other apocalyptic movies center around atomic or nuclear disasters such as On the Beach (1959), Planet of the Apes (1968), A Boy and His Dog (1975), The Day After (1983), Testament (1983), The Postman (1997), and Deadland (2009). Global warming is the culprit in The Day After Tomorrow (2004), solar flares in Where Have All the People Gone (1974), and solar storms cause global warming in 2012 (2009). In Night of the Comet (1984) it's a comet of course, in The Happening (2008) it's plant toxins, and in Waterworld (1995) the polar ice caps have melted and most of Earth is underwater. In Blindness (2008), an inexplicable case of white blindness sends a city into chaos, and in The Quiet Earth (1985) it's a government research project named "Project Flashlight" that goes awry. The TV series "Jericho" (2006-2008) blames the apocalypse on terrorist attacks, and in Planet Terror (2007) an experimental bio-nerve gas turns everyone into zombies. The villain is cyber-intelligence in The Matrix trilogy -- The Matrix (1999), The Matrix Reloaded (2003), and The Matrix Revolutions (2003). Still other movies, such as The Book of Eli (2010) and The Road (2009) cite no cause, simply showing how people try to survive after an apocalypse.

Carriers was at first rated R in ist uncut version in the states and, before the theatrical release, was cut to a financially more promising PG-13-rating by MPAA-typically removing some harsh language and several seconds resp. frames of rather bloody shots or, if necessary, replaced by more harmless alternative footage. In the US, only the edited PG-13 theatrical version was released on DVD and BD as well, while, as is known, the original uncut version was released in all of Europe. A detailed comparison between both versions with pictures can be found here.

Page last updated by DPir1320, 3 years ago
Top Contributors: bj_kuehl, hankeegle, DPir1320

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