7.2/10
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Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008)

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Devastated Peter takes a Hawaiian vacation in order to deal with the recent break-up with his TV star girlfriend, Sarah. Little does he know, Sarah's traveling to the same resort as her ex - and she's bringing along her new boyfriend.

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1,221 ( 47)
4 wins & 19 nominations. See more awards »

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Storyline

Peter is a composer and a likable sad sack who's devastated when his girlfriend of five years, Sarah Marshall, the star of a cheesy CSI-style crime show, dumps him. He weeps, he rails, he mopes. Finally, his step-brother Brian suggests Hawaii, so Peter heads for a resort on Oahu where, as he's checking in, he sees Sarah and her new beau, Aldous, a polymorphously perverse English rocker. The weeping and moping start again, until Peter is rescued by Rachel, a thoughtful hotel clerk who invites him to a luau and to hang out. Although he constantly runs into Sarah and Aldous, Peter starts to come alive again. Will Sarah realize what she's lost, and what about Rachel? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When Peter got dumped by his girlfriend, he wanted to get as far away as possible. Apparently... so did she See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual content, language and some graphic nudity | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

18 April 2008 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Askzede  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$17,725,330 (USA) (18 April 2008)

Gross:

$62,877,175 (USA) (4 July 2008)
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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the montage of Peter (Segel) and Sarah (Bell) on the different red carpets, one of the photographers shouts "André the Giant, out of the shot please!" In the 2009 film I Love You, Man (2009) Segel's character quotes André the Giant's line from The Princess Bride (1987) - "Anybody want a peanut?". To Paul Rudd's character. In an episode of Saturday Night Live Segel even imitates André the Giant completely in the segment 'Andre the Giant Chooses An Ice Cream Flavor.' See more »

Goofs

(Around 57:30) When Matthew the waiter is doing his English accent when giving his demo to Aldous Snow, Aldous' shirt collar corner alternates between pointing towards his chest and away from his chest. Also the yellow beads and red beads on his necklace alternate positions between shots. See more »

Quotes

Rachel Jansen: Why don't you press your feet up against the rock, and like shoot yourself off.
Peter Bretter: What, like a frog?
Rachel Jansen: I don't know Peter, just get off the fucking rock!
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Crazy Credits

Shortly after the end credits start, there is an advertisement for Sarah Marshall's new NBC crime drama, "Animal Instincts" in which her costar is Jason Bateman. See more »


Soundtracks

You Can't Break a Heart and Have It
Written by Herman Brood
Performed by Frank Black (as Black Francis)
Courtesy of Cooking Vinyl USA
By Arrangement with Sugaroo!
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Surprise Solid Comedy
19 March 2008 | by (Chicago, IL) – See all my reviews

I often go see advance screenings in my area, especially now that I must officially be on "the list" as I am constantly finding tickets in my work inbox. This was the second Apatow production I've seen in advance and just like "Superbad", this did not disappoint. At the same time, while many of the cast members may be recognizable, there seems to be something different about this installment than I've seen in the likes of "40 Year Old Virgin", "Superbad", or "Knocked Up".

For starters, there was a definite presence of the "TV actors on the big screen" theme here, but I am pleased to report that Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, and Mila Kunis take to movies like naturals. Like many Apatow productions, Segel penned the script and takes over as lead Peter Bretter, proving yet again that with this crew the writer is best suited for the leading role. Segel delivers a character we all know too well from our own personal experiences and never breaks role from the shocking beginning to appropriate ending. I even give Segel extra credit for not completely victimizing his character and pointing out apparent flaws on both ends of the ending relationship.

Kristen Bell plays Sarah Marshall, the iconic ex of the film, but her role sits on the back burner along with the truly hilarious Aldous Snow (Russell Brand) to make way for a leading role in Mila Kunis. From the beginning it is clear that her not-too-smart and shallow role of "That 70s Show" didn't follow her to "Forgetting"'s script. Kunis plays Racheal, a hospitality girl for the hotel that "Forgetting" takes place, and subsequently deals with Peter as he tries to get over Sarah Marshall. Her character is intelligent, charismatic, and appreciative of the good in people, a strong juxtaposition to the seemingly selfish starlet Sarah Marshall. Kunis owns the role with pride, even slipping in gestures and glances that didn't seem to initially be in the script. Hopefully this will open her up for more serious roles than "American Psycho 2" and the typecasting that often happens with TV actresses like her.

The star of the film, in my opinion, easily has to be Russell Brand, who plays the over-conscious over-sexed rock star Aldous Snow. Snow adds the necessary level of comedy that could have been missing from what is truly a tragic plot. About halfway in the film, I couldn't help but snicker to myself just with the presence that Brand creates (complete with perfect costume choices). The only downfall to a character who is truly the Mercutio of this tragedy is that Brand clearly overshadows Bell's performance as Sarah Marshall, who is ironically the most forgettable character of the film.

The writing flows with well-timed jokes, apathetic digs, and shocking vulgar humor. There is even a few moments where you feel Segel was digging on the cast with jokes involving crime dramas (Segel did time on "CSI") and TV actresses in horrible horror movies (Kunis did the atrocious "American Psycho 2"); not sure if it was intentional, but I caught what I thought was a reference. Just as with most Apatow productions, leave the kids at home. Unlike the rest, however, the crude humor doesn't overflow and turn off most audiences (like I noticed with "Superbad"). It also doesn't get very heavy in the least (which is what I felt hurt "Knocked Up"). I think Apatow has found a great balance with this production and Segel's script. I also want to give credit to Nicholas Stoller , who proved that he can be successful as a director after the hit he took from helping write "Fun with Dick and Jane".

All in all, this comedy is just another example of a good time for adults. It keeps a consistently flowing script, unlike many recent comedies that seem to lose pace as they close the story. While crude, the jokes are just light enough to appease most adult audiences and the short 100 minute run time will ensure you won't be glancing at your watch waiting for it to end, just laughing hysterically.


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