Harold wants to re-decorate but cannot agree on a colour scheme with his father so they agree to put a partition down the living room and have their own space on either side. There is even ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)

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(by), (by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Harry H. Corbett ...
Wilfrid Brambell ...
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Storyline

Harold wants to re-decorate but cannot agree on a colour scheme with his father so they agree to put a partition down the living room and have their own space on either side. There is even a coin-operated turnstile put in the hall which each must feed to pass through common ground. Unfortunately when the house catches fire the turnstile severely limits the firemen who do not have change for it. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Comedy

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Release Date:

27 March 1972 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Goofs

At the close Harold tips a jug of orange juice over Albert. This dislodges the cotton wool plaster on Wilfrid Brambell's forehead, making clear there is no cut or contusion added by the Make-Up department underneath. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Apartheid reaches Oil Drum Lane
2 July 2010 | by (Ambrosia) – See all my reviews

A fondly remembered episode, repeated as a tribute to Harry H.Corbett on the night he died.

Harold and Albert are discussing the redecoration of the house. The old man likes dark colours as they do not show the dirt, while his son is after something modern. Unable to agree, Harold comes up with the brilliant idea of partitioning the house so that he can live in one half and Albert in another. The only time they meet is in the hall, where they have to put pennies in a turnstile. This arrangement means they have to share certain things such as a cooker and a television set...

I am not going to pontificate on the political allegory contained here ( Berlin Wall, anyone? ) as others have done. This is a very funny episode that does not put a step wrong once.

Funniest moment - the Steptoes arguing over the television set. Harold wants the ballet on B.B.C.-2, but Albert puts football on. The son points out that they have an agreement that says he can choose the viewing on certain nights of the week. "I have the law of contract on my side!". Albert replies: "I've got the knobs on my side!".


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