Death at a Funeral
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

2 items from 2017


‘The Missing’ Review: Season 2 Reverses the Classic Kidnapping Narrative to Compelling New Ends

10 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Dramas focusing on a kidnapping — especially of young children — typically follow a simple trajectory: The family is introduced. The child is taken. The family is torn apart. A detective saves the day (or, at least, finds answers), and a happy ending or haunting lesson is imparted to the audience.

Typically, there’s a guessing game involved, as a number of suspicious supporting characters pop up throughout the story, and the audience is invited to solve the mystery. Their reward is being right or being surprised, but what typically elevates some kidnapping dramas above the rest is what elevates any drama: formal elements — directing, writing, acting — that build upon an audience’s immediate empathy for the taken child and the tormented family.

Read More: ‘The Missing’ Star David Morrissey on His ‘The Walking Dead’ Legacy and Those ‘Doctor Who’ Rumors

When “The Missing” debuted on Starz in November 2014, its differentiating formal »

- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Missing’ Review: Season 2 Reverses the Classic Kidnapping Narrative to Compelling New Ends

10 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Dramas focusing on a kidnapping — especially of young children — typically follow a simple trajectory: The family is introduced. The child is taken. The family is torn apart. A detective saves the day (or, at least, finds answers), and a happy ending or haunting lesson is imparted to the audience.

Typically, there’s a guessing game involved, as a number of suspicious supporting characters pop up throughout the story, and the audience is invited to solve the mystery. Their reward is being right or being surprised, but what typically elevates some kidnapping dramas above the rest is what elevates any drama: formal elements — directing, writing, acting — that build upon an audience’s immediate empathy for the taken child and the tormented family.

Read More: ‘The Missing’ Star David Morrissey on His ‘The Walking Dead’ Legacy and Those ‘Doctor Who’ Rumors

When “The Missing” debuted on Starz in November 2014, its differentiating formal »

- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

2 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners