IMDb > Drive (2011/I) > News
Drive
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Drive (2011/I) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 104 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Everything We Know About Khloé Kardashian's Romance with Tristan Thompson (So Far)

14 August 2017 9:13 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

In case you missed it, Khloé Kardashian has a new man in her life: NBA player Tristan Thompson.

And, naturally, we have a lot of questions. Like, how long have they been together? Is it serious? How does Kris Jenner feel about this?

We might not know all of those answers, but there are quite a few things we do know about her new beau.

He’S Very Much Her Type

Twenty-six-year-old Thompson already has an impressive NBA career under his belt. Originally from Canada, he was drafted by the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2011, and helped the team win its first NBA Championship in June. »

- Julia Emmanuele

Permalink | Report a problem


Bold Films Bets on Films From Reese Witherspoon, Ben Stiller, Keira Knightley

11 August 2017 8:39 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The independent film world can be brutal and there’s a high mortality rate for companies looking to break into the movie business. Over the past year, the likes of Broad Green, Alchemy, and Relativity Media have either scaled back their operations or shut off the lights entirely.

But Bold Films, the producer of “Nightcrawler” and “Whiplash,” believes that betting on auteurs is the key to its longevity. Now in its 14th year, it has inked “first look” deals with Ben Stiller’s Red Hour Productions and Jake Gyllenhaal’s Nine Stories Productions, and it’s preparing to unveil its most ambitious slate yet, a series of films featuring the likes of Reese Witherspoon, Keira Knightley, and Dev Patel.

Over the past two years, Bold has moved from buying packages, the industry term for films that agents cobble together with scripts and talent attached, to ramping up its in-house productions.

“The package market is thin, »

- Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


The Top 12 Composers of the 21st Century, From Hans Zimmer to Nick Cave

7 August 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In an age where special effects reign supreme, there’s one aspect of the filmmaking process that hasn’t gone through a radical transformation — music. Some of the best movies in any given year would be sorely lacking without their memorable scores, and this has remained true well into the first two decades of the 21st century.

Read More‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score

Film composers play an integral part in the filmmaking process, and there are a handful whose bodies of work stand out in recent years. Of course, this list of 12 major composers only begins to scratch the surface of the talent out there. There are plenty of other worthy contributors to the medium who didn’t make the cut — Danny Elfman and John Williams, we’re looking at you — but rest assured that this top dozen represent the cream of the crop.

Hans Zimmer »

- Gabrielle Kiss

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Blade Runner 2049’ Timeline Tells Us All We Need to Know About What Happens Between the Original and the Sequel

23 July 2017 9:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A lot happens between now and 2049. That’s one of the takeaways from yesterday’s “Blade Runner 2049” panel at Comic-Con, where Warner Bros. revealed much of what goes down between the original film (set in 2019 and released in 1982) and the upcoming sequel. Here are some of the key events:

Read More‘Blade Runner 2049’: At Comic-Con, You Can Drive a Flying Car As the Movie Comes to Life

2018: Replicants are declared illegal under penalty of death following a bloody mutiny.

2019: Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) and a prototype Replicant named Rachel abscond from Los Angeles together.

2022: Replicants are blamed for the Blackout, which shuts down cities for weeks, crashes financial markets, and leads to food shortages.

2025: Niander Wallace (Jared Leto) brings an end to the global food crisis.

2030s: Wallace, who now owns the Tyrell Corporation, uses genetic engineering to make Replicants more obedient and easier to control. »

- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


Ryan Reynolds in The Hitman's Bodyguard and more of our top Canadian actors

20 July 2017 7:29 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Ryan Reynolds in The Hitman's Bodyguard and more of our top Canadian actorsRyan Reynolds in The Hitman's Bodyguard and more of our top Canadian actorsZachary Dent7/20/2017 9:29:00 Am

With Ryan Reynolds starring in The Hitman's Bodyguard, we have the perfect excuse to countdown our favourite Canadian actors. Reynolds stars alongside Samuel L. Jackson as the world's top bodyguard who must protect an assassin who must testify at the International Court of Justice. We're excited for this interesting pairing of two actors we love. 

Check out our list of our favourite Canadian actors below!

Ryan Reynolds

Ryan Reynolds is another great Canadian actor who has become a household name around the world. Most would know him fromthe recent hit Deadpool. His role as the fast-talking antihero was well-received by critics and audiences alike. He can also be found starring in romantic comedies such as Definitely, Maybe and Just Friends. This B. »

- Zachary Dent

Permalink | Report a problem


Let The Right One In Director Returns with Crime Thriller The Snowman [Trailer]

19 July 2017 2:38 PM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

On paper, The Snowman sounds like a fairly generic thriller about two cops in search of a serial killer who likes to leave behind snowmen. I know. It sounds kind of dumb but this project has a whole lot going for it.

First off, it's based on a novel from Norwegian author Jo Nesbo who is also responsible for the rather brilliant Headhunters. The adaptation comes from Hossein Amini who also wrote Drive. The movie stars Michael Fassbender and Rebecca Ferguson as the two cops on the hunt for the killer along with J.K. Simmons, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Toby Jones, Chloe Sevigny and Val Kilmer.

Need further convincing? It's directed by Tomas Alfredson, the man who brought us Tinker Taylor Soldier Spy and the brilliant Let the Right One In.

[Continued ...] »

Permalink | Report a problem


Drive-In Dust Offs: Bug (1975)

8 July 2017 11:57 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Known as the King of the Gimmicks, producer/director William Castle will surely be remembered for such B staples as House on Haunted Hill (1959), The Tingler (also ’59) and 13 Ghosts (1960), cheap but fun pictures with added pleasure for the moviegoer by the use of ingenious devices such as Emergo, Percepto, and Illusion-o. It’s only fitting that he ended his career as co-writer/producer of Jeannot Szwarc’s Bug (1975), a nature gone amok flick that becomes a Weird-o halfway through to detail a descent into madness.

Distributed by Paramount Pictures in June, Bug didn’t make much of a dent in the summer box office, bringing in a little over $3.6 million and infuriating critics. Richard Eder of The New York Times called it “sick, and literally sickening.” Some people just can’t handle arson prone killer cockroaches, I guess. Never mind them, because the rest of us get to revel in »

- Scott Drebit

Permalink | Report a problem


Critical Thinking: Don’t Believe the Hype

8 July 2017 10:48 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Anghus Houvouras on hype and hyperbole…

Hype is something every film writer constantly struggles with. The perpetual entertainment news cycle gives film fans so much to chew on. There’s a formulaic cycle of hype that happens with every new movie that strokes the cockles of film fans. Some movies come with preordained hype. A new Star Wars or Marvel movie comes with pre-loaded with months of hype.

Last month the Black Panther trailer debuted and within minutes the internet was hit with a flood of energy and enthusiasm that rippled through every social media feed. People seemed thrilled to get their first glimpses of this extremely interesting new corner of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, though about 75% of the posts I saw were focused on the ‘genius’ of using Run The Jewels for the trailer.

A billion dollar studio used a popular song for a trailer? I wouldn’t exactly »

- Anghus Houvouras

Permalink | Report a problem


Top Canadian actors to celebrate Canada's 150th Birthday!

29 June 2017 12:29 PM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Top Canadian actors to celebrate Canada's 150th Birthday!Top Canadian actors to celebrate Canada's 150th Birthday!Zachary Dent6/29/2017 2:29:00 Pm

This Canada Day our fine country turns 150 years old! A lot has happened in 150 years, including the rise to stardom of scores of talented Canadian actors and actresses.

In fact, some might say that movie-making is in our DNA. Mary Pickford, an ambitious young woman from Toronto, is largely considered to be the first-ever global movie star. She may have earned a name for herself while in Hollywood, but she got her start right here at home. Countless Canadian actors have followed in her footsteps, representing Canadian talent on the world’s biggest stage. Comedy, drama, romance, you name it – Canadian actors have done it all.

Check out our list of our favourite Canadian actors below!

Ryan Gosling

Ryan Gosling really does it all: romance (The Notebook, Blue Valentine), comedy (Crazy Stupid Love, »

- Zachary Dent

Permalink | Report a problem


Edgar Wright on Subverting the Classic Heist Film for ‘Baby Driver’

28 June 2017 9:34 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

The ‘silent hero’, the ‘one last job’, the ‘damsel in distress’ – all familiar tropes, but in Edgar Wright’s terrific Baby Driver, these standards are re-mixed and subverted anew. Baby Driver’s sort of the yang to the yin of Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive. Both films take the familiar tropes that Walter Hill perfected in cult-classic The Driver – in particular Ryan O’Neal’s silent hero – and twist them on their head. For Refn that means beneath the visage of the stoic, silent hero lurks an emotionally unstable sociopath. For Wright, however, that means beneath the silent … »

- Tommy Cook

Permalink | Report a problem


Soundtracking: "Drive"

28 June 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

It's Chris Feil's weekly column on music in the movies! This week is the techno mythmaking of Drive:

So there’s a new musically-infused motorist crime tale on the block? While Baby Driver tries to take space on your headphones, it may still have to take a backseat to something even more moodily effective (if less uplifting): Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive.

Refn is no stranger to using music (mostly in original scores from frequent collaborator Cliff Martinez) to help build his films’ elusive auras, but he has never been so successful as using this tool as he is here. This film’s musical identity is inextricably linked to the protagonist in ways that inform the audience of his psychosis as much as the subtlety of Ryan Gosling’s performance. Just as Gosling pulls us into the mind of a lovable psychopath, the song choices help make this grim pulp landscape something beautiful. »

- Chris Feil

Permalink | Report a problem


'Baby Driver' Review: Buckle Up For Edgar Wright's Go-For-Broke Pulp Musical

27 June 2017 10:54 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Now this is what I call a summer movie. Baby Driver has it all: thrills, laughs, sex, nonstop action, a killer soundtrack, a star-making performance from Ansel Elgort and a director – Edgar Wright – who can knock the wind out of you. When was the last time to got pumped by a car chase? This revved-up ride of a movie is loaded with them, and they're spectacular.

Ok, let's back up and get our bearings. Elgort, the teen dream of The Fault in Our Stars, plays Baby, an Atlanta getaway driver with chronic tinnitus. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Baby Driver review – Edgar Wright puts pedal to the metal for wildly enjoyable heist caper

27 June 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This high-revving thrill ride about a music-obsessed teenage getaway driver is a terrifically stylish piece of work with a banging soundtrack

In 2011 a resident of Oakland, Michigan, caused a sensation by bringing a lawsuit against Nicolas Winding Refn’s film Drive for not having enough actual pedal-to-the-metal driving in it. That same person could hardly do the same to Edgar Wright, director of this outrageously enjoyable petrolhead heist caper, unless it would be for not showing a supercool adult chauffeur atop a Pamper-wearing infant with a steering wheel between its tiny shoulder blades roaring up the M25.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Baby Driver, Top-Notch Action Mixed With Sheer Fun

27 June 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Voom voom voom! So begins Edgar Wright's Baby Driver, which finds Ansel Elgort behind the wheel as a getaway driver, rocking out to a song blasting from the buds planted in his ears. In the privacy of his own space, the young driver known as Baby lip-syncs with total abandon, or as much abandon as he can manage while strapped into an automobile parked outside a bank while his criminal cohorts rob it. Soon they are racing down the streets and highways of Atlanta, the cohorts bug-eyed as Baby revs, shifts, and jams that wheel. The hot pursuit is an early tour de force in the movie, which pays homage to Walter Hill's The Driver in a distinctly different manner than Nicolas Winding Refn's Drive....

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

Permalink | Report a problem


Baby Driver Review #2: A Turbo-Charged Action Classic

23 June 2017 3:15 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Edgar Wright (Hot Fuzz, Shaun of the Dead) shifts the summer box office into fifth gear with Baby Driver, a turbo-charged action flick that runs like a two hour music video. Star Ansel Elgort (Carrie, The Fault in Our Stars) breaks out from his teeny bopper past with high-octane gusto. He emerges as a bonafide leading man. Not too shabby in a film with heavyweight actors like Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx, and Jon Hamm. I got a bit tired of the frenetic camera work, but a minor critique as Baby Driver dazzles with energy and creativity.

The film takes place in Atlanta, Georgia. A cherub faced getaway driver, codenamed Baby (Ansel Elgort), works at the beck and call of a ruthless crime boss (Kevin Spacey). Afflicted with tinnitus after a childhood accident, Baby rarely speaks and wears headphones to drown out the ringing. He ferrets ruthless gangsters from their high »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Baby Driver Review: The Definition Of Cool

23 June 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Writer/Director Edgar Wright is known for his unique films that both satarize and embrace whatever genre he chooses. We're talking Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, and The World's End. Wright's dialogue is always poetic with the sharpest wit and most clever word-plays. His editing style is unmistakable, fast and in your face, smashing one scene seamlessly into another. His shots are colorful, with just as much to say as the dialogue that accompanies them. His action scenes are sincere, brutal, and among the best out there; it's a wonder that Wright hasn't been handed a giant action franchise on a scale even bigger than Baby Driver (Though we guess Ant-Man would have been that film, had he stayed on). Wright's actors are always top notch, selected with care and directed to perfection. All four of his previous releases are winners for these reasons, »

- Nick Doll

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Baby Driver’ Review

22 June 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Ansel Elgort, Lily James, Kevin Space, John Hamm, Jamie Foxx | Written and Directed by Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright’s return to American moviemaking is a more earnest and coherent foray than 2010’s Scott Pilgrim, and it’s a blast of pure positive energy after the relatively dour The World’s End. It opens with the eponymous Baby (Ansel Elgort) rocking in his car to The John Spencer Blues Explosion, and it never stops dancing.

Baby is a guy with a permanent Tony Manero swagger. He’s under the wing of gangster boss Doc (Kevin Spacey), who’s both a mentor and gaoler. But Baby has almost paid off his debt and he’s approaching the “one last job” cliché, after which he hopes to hit the road and leave his Atlanta life behind.

Then Baby meets a beautiful waitress, Debora (Lily James). They quickly fall in love. However, the freeway out of the crime world is not clear. Doc needs Baby for yet another last job, working alongside the hyper-macho Buddy (John Hamm) and his scheming girlfriend Darling (Eiza Gonzalez), and the batshit crazy Bats (Jamie Foxx).

Can Baby finish his getaway driver stint and find freedom and a future with Debora? Or is he on a road to oblivion?

Life is a playlist for Baby. A childhood accident left him with tinnitus, and now he drowns out the whining through the power of the iPod, wearing earbuds 23 hours a day and moving to the thrum of the music. (He even samples real-world conversations and mixes them into bad hip-hop.) Wright’s penchant for rhythmic editing has reached its natural zenith, and it’s exhilarating.  The British auteur has compiled a soundtrack – and frankly a narrative brevity – of which Tarantino can only dream. And it’s not just the music but the sound design, which is astonishingly detailed and well-choreographed, whether it’s the percussive crack of gunfire, the sad ring of tinnitus, or the intimate singing of wine glasses.

The marketing may have overtones of classic car capers like Sam Peckinpah’s The Getaway or Walter Hill’s The Driver, but really Baby Driver is a mashup of the last few decades of modern action movies. It takes in the muscular physicality and mute cool of the ‘70s; the efficiency and the gaudy aesthetic of the ‘80s and ‘90s; and in its hero shaped by formative tragedy, even includes some of the comic book sensibility of the new century. It also feels like the greatest Grand Theft Auto movie never made. (If only Baby could learn from GTA that sometimes the best way to evade the cops is to stay still until the heat is off.)

Elgort is charming and tragic in a way that he totally wasn’t in The Fault in Our Stars, and he has a great chemistry with James, who pulls off blue collar Georgian with effortless aplomb. In supporting roles, Spacey brings gravitas and grades of grey to his deadpan mobster, while Foxx is genuinely funny and menacing.

But Hamm is the real psychotic of the troupe. Unlike Bats, Buddy comes in the guise of a friend, before finally actualising his rage and cruelty. It’s disappointing that the final showdown descends into a mindless macho wrestle, but the storytelling is movingly redeemed in the epilogue.

As ever, Wright is constantly imaginative in deploying his action beats and setpieces. For him, it’s not enough to give us a scuzzy warehouse gun deal, so he delivers it as if a group of bankers are being presented with a fine dining experience. Wright gleefully toys with our expectations throughout, whether it means building to the ultimate car chase, only to show us a foot race; giving us musical intros we think we know but we don’t; or inverting the mentor role by making the kid the carer.

A very welcome stem of morality runs through the movie. It is made abundantly – perhaps excessively – clear that Baby is a boy with a good heart, a million miles from the French Connection-type antihero. Yet, ever the optimist, Wright’s fable is as much a reflection of the countercultural mood of its time as any film from the Nixon era. He is right-on when he proposes that real heroism in the modern age is in decency, accountability and humility – an implicit indictment, perhaps, of today’s prevailing political bleakness.

What a rush this movie is, and what a work of authorship. Employing style in the service of soulfulness, Baby Driver is like Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive shot through with the sensibility of a Hollywood musical. It’s absolutely an Edgar Wright joint and it’s an absolute joy, and if it isn’t on my end-of-year best-of list then I’ll eat my driving gloves.

Baby Driver is out in cinemas on 28th June 2017. »

- Rupert Harvey

Permalink | Report a problem


More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

Permalink | Report a problem


Baby Driver review

20 June 2017 7:50 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Edgar Wright turns his hand to a hip, 70s style thriller with Baby Driver. We take a closer look...

It’s one of the drawbacks as life as a filmmaker: you can sink months or even years of your life into a screenplay that will never be sold or a movie project that will never go into production. Such was the fate of Ant-Man, director Edgar Wright’s take on the Marvel superhero; Wright departed the project in 2014, eight years after he began working on it with co-writer Joe Cornish. The film was finally brought to the screen by Yes Man director Peyton Reed; like David Cronenberg’s Total Recall or Guillermo del Toro’s The Hobbit, Wright’s Ant-Man became one of cinema’s what-might-have-beens.

See related  Deadpool: Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick interview Deadpool: Ryan Reynolds on channeling the character

Still, if Wright’s brush with Marvel »

Permalink | Report a problem


Kanye West: 40 Years of Fire -- The Ultimate Birthday Playlist!

8 June 2017 9:15 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Wake up, Mr. West. It's your birthday!

On "No More Parties in L.A." off The Life of Pablo, Kanye West describes himself as "a 38-year-old 8-year-old," which is maybe a perfect summation of the qualities that have made the 40-year-old rapper such an enigma: a larger-than-life icon who has cultivated a persona that draws as much infamy as it does reverence, with a head-spinning number of acclaimed tracks to show for it.

Watch: Inside Kanye West's 40th Birthday in Bahamas With Kim Kardashian and Their Kids: 'No Work or Social Media'

Somehow, as Kanye has gotten older, his almost youthful sense for defiance and creativity have created work that has only gotten more experimental, more groundbreaking, and with each new album, inspired a new crop of artists of hip hop and of music in general.

The roster of rappers that 'Ye has inspired is truly staggering. Chance the Rapper has rhapsodized about the transformative »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 104 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners