Leave It to Beaver (1957–1963)
7.9/10
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Stocks and Bonds 

Ward decides to teach Wally a real-life lesson in economics by helping him and Beaver invest one hundred dollars in the stock market. But when the nice, solid utility stock recommended by ... See full summary »

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(teleplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

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Theodore Cleaver
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Storyline

Ward decides to teach Wally a real-life lesson in economics by helping him and Beaver invest one hundred dollars in the stock market. But when the nice, solid utility stock recommended by their dad doesn't show much activity, the boys decide to take Eddie Haskell's advice and buy risky, but rising, space tech stock. Written by shepherd1138

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Comedy | Family

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TV-G
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Release Date:

23 June 1962 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Goofs

The boys, somewhat manipulated (guided?) by Ward's advice, decide to buy stock in a local utility. The name of the company changes considerably as the story progresses. First, at the breakfast table, Ward calls it "Mayfield Power and Electric". Minutes later, as they meet Eddie on the front porch to walk to school, Wally refers to it as "Mayfield Power and Light". Then, at dinner one night, June refers to it as "Mayfield Electric and Power". Solid, dependable stock, perhaps, but a highly variable name in the words of these actors. See more »

Quotes

Eddie Haskell: Mrs. Cleaver you've done something new to your hair.
June Cleaver: Not a thing.
Eddie Haskell: Oh it looks very nice.
Ward Cleaver: Sometimes that kid gets under my skin.
June Cleaver: Sometimes I think he's a very nice boy.
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User Reviews

 
Who would use Eddie Haskell as their broker?
16 May 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Wally is studying economics in school and could use some help; he figures his dad will offer to help when he sees him struggling. Ward tries to help Wally but finds himself struggling with June who keeps interrupting. Ward decides it might be useful if the boys invest some real money, so he offers to match their $50 with $50 from him. June doesn't like the idea.

The boys scan the financial page and end up arguing over what to buy. Eddie shows up and suggests a local company. The stock is 50 cents a share and Eddie says they will make a fortune, the stock is Gen Electro and it is a space age stock. After all, he argues; this is the space age. Ward and June are pushing Mayfield Power and Electric, a solid company. The boys go along with their dad. Eddie, of course, puts their choice down. He claims the boys are babies who let their dad push them around. They can't even pick their own stock. Eddie insists the company he picked would have made them rich. With a total investment of $100, it's not likely they will be too rich.

The boys scan the financial pages and Mayfield Power is still even. Wally wonders what if Eddie is right. Eddie's stock has risen to 75 cents. Ward assures the boys he checked with his broker, and he was opposed to Gen Electro. At $2.50 a share though, Wally and Beaver figure they would have made a pile. With Eddie needling them the boys wonder if they can switch their stock and buy Gen Electro. The boys are happy now, it's up to $3 a share. Beaver is beginning to think he's. rich. But then the government cancels contracts and Gen Electro drops to 75 cents a share. Eventually, it will just collapse.

The boys are devastated. They are wiped out. Not quite. Ward left his broker with a sell order if Gen Electro dropped to $2.50. Then buy back Mayfield Power. The boys are even and dad is a genius, for now. Eddie is back to being a jerk.

A decent episode that has a good conflict, and teaches its audience a bit about stocks and risk management.


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