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The Slanted Screen (2006)

From silent film star Sessue Hayakawa to Harold and Kumar Go to Whitecastle, the Slanted Screen examines the portrayal Asian men in film and television, and how new filmmakers are now ... See full summary »

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From silent film star Sessue Hayakawa to Harold and Kumar Go to Whitecastle, the Slanted Screen examines the portrayal Asian men in film and television, and how new filmmakers are now re-defining age-old stereotypes. Includes interviews with actors Mako, Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa, James Shigeta, Dustin Nguyen, Will Yun Lee, Phillip Rhee, Tzi Ma, comedian Bobby Lee, producer Terence Chang, casting director Heidi Levitt and directors Gene Cajayon and Eric Byler. The film contains over 50 film clips of depictions of Asian American male characters from Hollywood films spanning almost a century. It asks why and how stereotypic portrayals continue to persist, and why the roles for Asian American men are diminishing while the Asian American population is increasing. Written by Jeff Adachi

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asian | See All (1) »

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12 March 2006 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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good documentary
5 April 2009 | by See all my reviews

The documentary showd Hollywood portrayal of Asian Americans from the silent file era to today, and it claims that really nothing has changed much during this time.

This should be expected since the amount of Asian immigrants coming to this country has steadily increased during this time. I think currently it's still increasing after they lax'd the immigration laws. Of course if there are more and more first generation immigrants, Asian Americans are going to be portrayed like them since they represent the majority. Asian Americans born in the United States are also increasing but at a slower pace, and they are statistically not representative of the majority of Asians in this country, and Hollywood is not going to make that distinction nor should we expect them to. So unless Asian immigration goes down, or the overall quality of those first generation immigrants goes up, neither of which is very likely then we should expect pretty much the same for the next 80 years or so.


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