5.4/10
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17 user

The Mermaid Chair (2006)

A married woman (Basinger) falls in love with a Benedictine monk.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (teleplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Hugh Sullivan
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Nelle
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Kat
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Hepzibah
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Benne
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Father Dominic
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Dee Sullivan (as Victoria Anderson)
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Joseph Dubois
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Shem
Terence Kelly ...
Dom Anthony
Joanne Wilson ...
Woman Patient
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Brother Timothy
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Tourist
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Storyline

A married woman (Basinger) falls in love with a Benedictine monk.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

TV-PG

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Language:

Release Date:

9 September 2006 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Sereia e o Monge  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

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Did You Know?

Quotes

Brother 'Whit' Thomas: Now that my ladder's gone, I must lie down where all the ladders start, in the foul rag-and-bone shop of the heart.
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User Reviews

 
Add Me ToThe Negative Column
12 September 2006 | by See all my reviews

I had several problems with the movie:

(1) The screenplay -- specifically, Kim Basinger's voice over: Movies are not books; they should *show* the action rather than have a voice over *tell* us what's happening. Occasionally I find a movie with a voice over that works, but here it seemed more of a lazy way of writing the script. In fact, it sounded to me as if she was practically reading excerpts from the novel in her voice over.

(2) I felt no emotion in the relationship between Jessie and Brother Thomas and also felt that Alex Carter's acting was pretty bad. That's a significant failure for me in defining Jessie's and Thomas' characters -- with no connection between them, it seemed to me as if she just wanted a stud and that for him it was a matter of being sex-deprived. If it had been properly done, the relationship between them would have given much more context to the story.

(3) With the book, I understood Jessie's mid-life crisis. In the movie, it seemed more like just plain boredom.

On the plus side, I didn't think the movie was so bad as for me to turn off the TV . . . though that thought did occur to me.


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