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Friday the 13th (2009) Poster

Trivia

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Including the 2009 remake, Jason has killed 167 total people throughout the "Friday the 13th" series.
Clay and Whitney's last name is Miller. This is a reference to Victor Miller, the creator of the Friday the 13th (1980) series.
The first time Paramount has any association with the "Friday the 13th" series since 1989.
Producer Michael Bay walked out in the movie premiere, stating that the movie featured too much sex.
Adrienne King, star of the original 1980 film, was approached by producers Andrew Form and Bradley Fuller to do a cameo appearance during preproduction. A few days later, the producers called her back and told her they didn't want anyone from the original film to appear in the remake.
In this movie Jason wears both the legendary hockey mask and the burlap sac, although neither of those appeared in the original Friday the 13th (1980). The burlap sac was the first mask worn by Jason in Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981) and the hockey mask did not appear until Friday the 13th Part III (1982).
According to co-writer Damian Shannon, the character of Jason Voorhees was re-envisioned as more territorial, like a hunter, someone who doesn't kill people at random but will defend his territory from anyone invading it, and this in the most horrible manner. Director Marcus Nispel similarly claims the film shows new aspects of Jason's personality. Derek Mears says his portrayal of Jason as a survivalist defending his territory is partially inspired by the character of John Rambo in First Blood (1982).
Tommy Jarvis, a character that appeared in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984), Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985), and Jason Lives: Friday the 13th Part VI (1986) was at one point confirmed by producers Bradley Fuller and Andrew Form of Platinum Dunes to be returning as Jason's nemesis.
On hiatus from their show, both Jared Padalecki and his Supernatural (2005) co-star Jensen Ackles did remakes of 80's slasher movies, Jared doing "Friday the 13th" and Jensen doing My Bloody Valentine (2009).
The first film in the series released by both New Line Cinema and Paramount Pictures. Originally, Paramount owned the rights to the series after the original was released in 1980 but sold the rights to New Line Cinema in the early 1990's after poor box office returns of Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan (1989). New Line bought the rights to the characters of Jason Voorhees and Pamela Voorhees, the Crystal Lake name, and the trademark for the title "Friday the 13th". All footage from the first eight films and the remake rights for the first film remained the property of Paramount. New Line Cinema released Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday (1993), Jason X (2001) and Freddy vs. Jason (2003). When Platinum Dunes came aboard to develop the new film, they wanted the freedom to use scenarios and characters from the films still owned by Paramount. After a legal dispute, the companies decided to co-produce the 2009 film.
With $42.2 mil, had the biggest opening weekend of a horror-remake beating out former record holder The Grudge (2004) ($39.1 mil).
Although it's only been regarded as a remake of Friday the 13th (1980), it also combines story elements from Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981) and Friday the 13th Part III (1982), along with several references to Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985), Jason Lives: Friday the 13th Part VI (1986), and Jason X (2001).
The title card of the movie isn't displayed until the end of the opening segment, nearly 25 minutes into the film.
Derek Mears is the eighth actor to portray the adult Jason Voorhees in the series, following Steve Dash, Warrington Gillete, Richard Brooker, Ted White, C.J. Graham, Kane Hodder and Ken Kirzinger. As of this movie, Hodder is the only actor to have portrayed the character more than once, with four films under his belt from 1988 to 2001. This also makes Hodder the only actor to have portrayed the character more than once in the series.
The film was released on Friday, February 13, 2009. It just so happens that February, March, and November all have a Friday the 13th in 2009.
One of the victims was originally supposed to drown due to exhaustion as Jason waited her out from the shore of the lake.
Actress Willa Ford was given 10 days to learn how to wake board for her role.
Despite the title, the date the events supposedly take place on, Friday the 13th, is only mentioned once. The date can be seen on a tear-away type calendar in the police station, as the officers leave to investigate towards the end of the movie.
With $42.2 mil, had the biggest opening weekend of any movie in the "Friday the 13th" series.
The film's setting (New Jersey) is an homage to the original film being filmed in New Jersey.
Scout Taylor-Compton auditioned for the role of 'Jenna' which eventually went to Danielle Panabaker.
Richard Burgi wasn't cast as Sheriff Bracke until 12 hours before they needed to begin filming his character's scenes.
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Jason just randomly appearing out of thin air as in the earlier films wouldn't fly this time around. So, they decided he traveled via a series of underground tunnels. That concept was in Mark Wheaton's original script, but Mark Swift and Damian Shannon claimed to have never read Wheaton's script until the film was finished, having come up with the same idea about the tunnels on their own. As for the marijuana plant farm which Jason appears to use to lure teenagers into traps, apparently no writer can claim that as their own. According to Swift and Shannon, that was actually director Marcus Nispel's idea from early on in the development process, and it was their job to work it into the script.
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Whereas this film was shot in Texas (mostly Austin), the original Friday the 13th (1980) was filmed in New Jersey (mostly Blairstown and Hope).
The character of Sheriff Bracke, played by Richard Burgi, is named after author Peter Bracke, who wrote the book "Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th".
Interestingly, co-writers Damian Shannon and Mark Swift were involved with both the conclusion of the old Friday The 13th series and the start of the new one. Indeed, their first produced script (this is their second) was that of Freddy vs. Jason (2003), the last installment in both the original Friday The 13th and A Nightmare On Elm Street series (even though Jason X (2001) takes place later).
A sequel was announced by Platinum Dunes after the theatrical release of the movie, but after a year of no news where production stood on the sequel, producer Bradley Fuller confirmed via his Twitter account the sequel had gone out of production.
Producer Bradley Fuller believes the reason that the Friday The 13th movies have become so iconic and have terrified audiences so is that many of the people who seen the films have themselves been to holiday camps such as the fictitious Camp Crystal Lake, or have at least already gone camping.
When approaching the film, one of the main questions director Marcus Nispel asked himself was what aspects of the Friday The 13th mythology would moviegoers want to see again and again. He was also concerned about giving the audience what they wanted, but not what they were expecting.
Jason's most notable nemesis, Tommy Jarvis, didn't come around until Friday the 13th IV: The Final Chapter, but he got to stick around for 3 films and was never killed off. So, Mark Swift and Damian Shannan's Freddy Vs. Jason script included Tommy as a significant player in the film's climax, but it was cut out prior to casting or filming by David S. Goyer and director Ronny Yu. In early 2007, Platinum Dunes producers let it slip that they were talking about using Tommy as a major character.
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Screenwriters Mark Swift and Damian Shannon wanted Jason's body count in the film to be just 13 as an easter egg for fans. It was surprising how much work it was to kill thirteen people." Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter pulled off the "just 13 kills" thing as well, and Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives writer/director Tom McLoughlin originally turned in a film featuring just 13 kills. Executive Producer Frank Mancuso, Jr. forced him to perform re-shoots to up the body count to 18.
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Jonathan Liebesman, director of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006), which was also produced by Platinum Dunes, was once in negotiations to direct the film. Rather, Dunes decided to bring back Marcus Nispel who directed The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003).
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It shares screenwriters with Freddy Vs. Jason, who had previously turned down the chance to do a Freddy Vs. Jason sequel. Damian Shannon and Mark Swift

As a result of the legal delays, Friday the 13th lost its original director (Jonathan Liebesman) and screenwriter (Mark Wheaton). Freddy Vs. Jason writers Mark Swift and Damian Shannon, who had earned their first writing credit with Freddy Vs. Jason but had yet to get another script onto the screen, were brought in to replace Wheaton. Both grew up huge Jason/Freddy fans, but their Freddy Vs. Jason script was largely re-written by David S. Goyer, who went uncredited, and the far campier film that came out of that was not to their liking. Still, New Line actually offered them the chance to pitch ideas for a Freddy Vs. Jason 2, which they turned down, according to Shannon, because "we thought maybe somebody else should tackle it because we shot our wad so to speak. Every idea we had about that was in the first. I don't know what we could have done with a second one."
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Released over the Presidents Day weekend in February 2009, Friday the 13th earned a stunning $40 million opening weekend, $43.5 million 4-Day Presidents Day opening. This remains among the biggest openings for a horror film, but while that's the good news the bad news is that no film which has made that much money its opening weekend has ever dropped as much Friday the 13th did in its second weekend. Return to the Blue Lagoon (80.8%), Bad Moon (81.5%), Gigli (81.9%), Slow Burn (84.7%), and Undiscovered (86.4%). Among those films, only Blue Lagoon and Gigli's opening weekends had even risen above $1 million. You have to drop down to #'s 22 (The Devil Inside) and 26 (The Purge) on the list to find films whose opening weekends had at least been above $30 million.
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Travis Van Winkle portrayed the same character from Transformers (2007) which was directed by Michael Bay.
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Principal photography wrapped on Friday, June 13, 2008. Additionally, the American theatrical release date was Friday, February 13, 2009.
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This is director Marcus Nispel's second remake of a classic horror film in a resume of only four features. The first was The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003), which was also produced by the company Platinum Dunes.
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Derek Mears is a really, really nice guy. That's why they were reluctant to cast him as Jason.
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Warner Bros. (through its New Line Cinema label) is distributing this film in North America while Paramount will distribute the film in most all other territories. Ironically (and coincidentally), the 1980 original was distributed by Paramount in North America, with international distribution being handled by Warner Bros.
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Aaron Yoo actually won the role of "Chewie" very close to shooting. Up until then, one of the top choices to play him was David Blue.
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Samuel Bayer turned down the offer to direct.
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In an earlier scene, a reference was made towards director David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986). The argument that Pabst Blue Ribbon beer is better than Heineken, was a quote by Dennis Hopper's character (Frank Booth) towards Kyle MacLachlan's character (Jeffrey Beaumont): Frank: "What kind of beer do you like?". Jeffrey: "Heineken". Frank: "Heineken? Fuck that shit! Pabst Blue Ribbon!"
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Marks the first time Paramount Pictures had anything to do with Friday the 13th since Jason Takes Manhattan in 1989 and the end of Friday the 13th: The Series in 1990.
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Israeli actress Moran Atias was originally cast but had to be replaced early into filming.
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The film takes place on June 13, 1980 and in 2009.
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This film was New Line Cinema's first traditional co-production with another major studio, in which one studio distributed in the United States and Canada, and the other in all other countries.
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When exploring the (supposed) Voorhees house the comment of the items being 'from another century' is made, as the original film was 1980 and this sequel is 2009 it is technically true that the items are from another century.
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Jennifer Sciole auditioned for a lead role.
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John Moore was considered for the directing job at early stages of production.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The script originally had Jenna dying later on in the film than she did in the final cut. In the finished film, Jenna is killed as Clay and Whitney are pulling her out of Jason's lair. Originally, Jenna would have hidden from Jason in the abandoned bus with Clay and Whitney after escaping from his lair, exchanged dialogue with Clay about doing something more romantic on their next date and she then would have been killed by Jason with a fire extinguisher.
Body count 14 (13 of which are killed by Jason).
The character Richie was one of a few characters to have CGI effects added into his death. Derek Mears (Jason) was holding only the handle with half the blade of the fake machete, making it look like it impaled Richie's (Ben Feldman's) head. The visual effects crew digitally superimposed the fake machete to look like it was a completely bladed weapon in the final film. Director Marcus Nispel usually allowed minimal use of CGI effects into his films.
After Aaron Yoo's character Chewie is killed, his body is hung upside down from the shed's rafter. As he is dangling lifelessly, you can visibly see Yoo's scar on his abdomen. In real life Yoo had his appendix removed and that director Marcus Nispel wanted that scene to be filmed promptly as Yoo was still recovering from surgery.

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