A doctor learns that his step son is admiring a gunfighter. When the gunfighter is wounded, a series of dilemmas are faced by the doctor.

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(story) (as Dory Langdon), (teleplay)
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Himself - Host / Dr. Mike Reynolds
...
Julie Reynolds
...
Sheriff Les Houghton
Ralph Reed ...
Nick Reynolds
...
Walt Matthews
Brett King ...
Dolf Akins
...
Tom Menken
...
Earl Watkins
...
Harper Bates
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Storyline

A doctor learns that his step son is admiring a gunfighter. When the gunfighter is wounded, a series of dilemmas are faced by the doctor.

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Genres:

Western

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Release Date:

18 December 1958 (USA)  »

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Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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The Hippocratic Oath
14 December 2016 | by (Buffalo, New York) – See all my reviews

The only thing wrong with this Zane Grey Theater short story is the fact that the Hippocratic Oath is never mentioned in this story about a doctor's obligation in the old west. Dick Powell took this one for himself and stars in this story about a doctor's obligations wherever he is and whatever the circumstances.

Brett King is a gunfighter punk who has killed three men already after goading them into a gunfight. His sidekick worshiper is Ralph Reed stepson of town doctor Dick Powell.

When Reed himself is wounded after a fight with Frank Ferguson who also died he's brought to Powell. There's a lot of sentiment for Powell to just give him some benign neglect. But Powell has his Hippocratic Oath and won't give in.

Not even to wife Marsha Hunt who has her own reasons for wanting King to just die.

This is one excellent story and Dick Powell who always said be on the cutting edge of the entertainment. When the roles were no longer forthcoming on the big screen he went to the small and on the producing end as well. In fact he should have been justly proud of his work here.


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