A man lures important government officials into his disco so he can rob their minds. Music legend Wolfman Jack guest stars.

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(based on characters created by) (as Charles Moulton), (developed for television by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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...
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Del Franklin
Ellen Weston ...
Angelique
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Kathy Munro
Victor Mohica ...
Lance
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Norman (as Bob Hoy)
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Nick Moreno
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Colonel
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Infra Red
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Andrew Borden
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Foreman
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Kerwin (as Dennis J. Stewart)
Linda Fernandez ...
Female Dancer
Betty A. Bridges ...
Receptionist (as Betty Bridges)
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Storyline

A man lures important government officials into his disco so he can rob their minds. Music legend Wolfman Jack guest stars.

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Details

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Release Date:

20 October 1978 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The discotheque called the "Styx" refers to the river Styx from Greek mythology that forms the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, although some would claim it was named after the rock band Styx. See more »

Goofs

Russell Johnson is a US Army Colonel. His hat is missing on the bill of hat, the golden oak leaf embellishment, known as scrambled eggs. Major, and above rank, officer's hat has the oak leafs. See more »

Quotes

Norman: I'll take care of her.
[takes out his gun]
Angelique: Put that away, you can't use that in here.
Norman: What do you want me to do, throw records at her?
Angelique: I don't care if you have to drown her in club soda, just get her.
See more »

Connections

Edited into Wonder Woman: The Ultimate Feminist Icon (2005) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Dance Till You Just Don't Care
10 October 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

After a failed readiness test at a U.S. military nuclear institution, Diana Prince discovers a cell of spies at a disco. But she finds that they have a secret spy weapon in a psychic who steals memories and leaves the victim blank. This is dangerous for Diana, for she fears her secret ID is in danger of being revealed.

When the producers changed from the WWII version of Wonder Woman to the modern version, the creators said that they would have more choices to create better story lines. That statement would be hard to believe from watching "Disco Devil". The story seams tired and void of creativity. It was done in 1979, near the end of the Disco Era, and even the title seams silly and exploitive. It was written by Alan Brennert, and if this is a fair example of his work, I'll try and avoid his stuff in the future.

There is nothing of note in either the adventure or the science fiction genres. Brennert uses the standard plot line of good psychic/bad psychic, and it plays out like a soap opera. Diana Prince theorizes that Del Franklin (Paul Sand) might be the psychic involved with the sellers of state secrets group. But when she interviews him, she discovers that he is self deprecating and ashamed of his powers, and too weak to be a villain. She recruits him to help her, instead. (?) Lucky us. The audience gets to listen to his moaning "why me?" for the next 30 minutes.

In the meantime, the real villain, Nick Moreno (Michael DeLano), is enjoying his powers, and primping in front of the mirror in order to get his disco suits just right. He goes hunting on the dance floor, snarling out orders, and preparing for his eventual appearance on "Dallas". (Perhaps if the psychic pair would have had a melt down that caused everyone to get the Boogie Fever...)


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