Wild West Tech (2003–2005)
Needs 5 Ratings
Saloons were the social place for men in the west providing liquor, gambling, music, sex, and other entertainment. Saloons often started as tents with a wood slab across a couple of barrels... See full summary »
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
...
Himself - Host
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Boessenecker ...
Himself
...
Edward Redbeard (as Jonathan Eisley)
Drew Gomber ...
Himself
...
Red Henley
Marcus Huff ...
Himself
Michael Lawrence Kaye ...
Jack Dempsey
...
Saloon Boxer
Roger McGrath ...
Himself
Brian Schmeck ...
Boxing Referee / Coach
Phil Spangenberger ...
Himself
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Storyline

Saloons were the social place for men in the west providing liquor, gambling, music, sex, and other entertainment. Saloons often started as tents with a wood slab across a couple of barrels for a bar. As towns became established the saloons moved into permanent structures with all types of enticements to drawn in the customers. A bar in Portland, Oregon had a 684 foot bar but also trap doors to aid in shanghaiing men to be sailors. It also featured a female band with an electric barrier around it. Fights were common and every weapon and tool available was used in them. Saloons were decorated with pictures of horses and especially nude women. In one case a picture was fitted with balloons that could be inflated to make parts of the woman move. Kalidoscopes and early forms of jukeboxes were available in the later years. Gambling including card and table games plus bets on anything. Boxing starting initially with bare-knuckle boxing was a major and bloody form of entertainment. Many ... Written by Anonymous

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1 February 2005 (USA)  »

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