Hiroshima and Nagasaki and their population experience the atomic bombs ever exploded. Emperor Hirohito tells his people that to prevent further loss of property and life, the war must end.

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Charles de Gaulle ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Leonard Graves ...
Narrator (voice)
William F. Halsey ...
Himself (archive footage)
Hirohito ...
Himself - Emperor of Japan (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Arthur Percival ...
Himself (archive footage)
Mamoru Shigemitsu ...
Himself - Foreign Minister of Japan (archive footage)
Yoshijiro Umezu ...
Himself - Chief of the Army General Staff (archive footage)
Jonathan M. Wainwright ...
Himself (archive footage)
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Hiroshima and Nagasaki and their population experience the atomic bombs ever exploded. Emperor Hirohito tells his people that to prevent further loss of property and life, the war must end.

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Release Date:

26 April 1953 (USA)  »

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Trivia

At the end of the 25th and final episode of "Victory at Sea," narrator Leonard Graves sites the second verse of Walt Whitman's "Song for All Seas, All Ships": "Flaunt out O Sea, your separate flags of nations! Flaunt out, visible as ever, the various ship-signals! But do you reserve especially for yourself, and for the soul of man, one flag above all the rest, A spiritual woven Signal, for all nations, emblem of man elate above death, Token of all brave captains, and all intrepid sailors and mates, And all that went down doing their duty; Reminiscent of them-twined from all intrepid captains, young or old; A pennant universal, subtly waving, all time, o'er all brave sailors, All seas, all ships." See more »

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Design for Peace marks final U.S. triumph in Victory at Sea
2 July 2007 | by (Baton Rouge, LA) – See all my reviews

This episode starts with footage of the atomic bomb that was tested in New Mexico before it goes on to the devastation that happened in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. With that Japan surrenders as that country's diplomat signs the official document prepared by the U.S. military before General MacArthur and fellow offerers also sign on. Before the war's end, however, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt dies during his fourth term in office. Millions attend his funeral to see his casket go by. As the day comes, the U.S. military comes to signs saying, "Welcome Home" before they are treated by mothers, wives, children's, and fellow neighbors. They also attend a parade in their honor as the series come to a close...Kudos as always for Leonard Graves' narration and Richard Rodgers' music. Also thanks to Henry Saloman and Richard Hanser for writing the whole thing, M. Clay Adams for the direction, Isaac Kleinerman for editing, and Saloman again for producing Victory at Sea. They all deserve a grand round of thanks for making perhaps the most important television documentary series ever made about World War II. Congrats all!


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