After 12 years of marriage, his wife Judith, kicks Alan out. He turns to his older brother Charlie for help. Charlie has trouble adjusting his carefree lifestyle with the presence of his 10 year old nephew.

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(created by), (created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Laura (as Kristin Bauer)
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Mike (as Tom Wilson)
Frankie J. Allison ...
Rodney (as Frankie Jay Allison)
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Lenny
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Suzanne
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Dan Foster ...
Ken
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Karen
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Storyline

Charlie Harper just had his pants down and a willing girl stripping for sex when his brother Alan calls, whose wife Judith threw him out with ten year-old son Jake. They move into playboy Charlie's beach-house 'a few days, tops', which seems an eternity for the serial seducer. Yet Jake grows on Charlie, as he proves a better babe-magnet then a puppy and a natural at seeing through poker-faces. When Judith announces the break-up is final, she may be lesbian, Charlie extends a long-term invitation to father and son, rather then let Jake undergo the influence of their selfish socialite mother from hell. Written by KGF Vissers

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Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

TV-14
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Release Date:

22 September 2003 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Charlie and Jake's first encounter with a woman in the supermarket is with Suzanne. The actress who plays her is Jennifer Taylor and this is her first appearance as one of three characters: Suzanne (here), Tina in Two and a Half Men: Last Chance to See Those Tattoos (2004), Nina in Two and a Half Men: Our Leather Gear Is in the Guest Room (2007), and finally the recurring character Chelsea for around 30 episodes. See more »

Goofs

The blind on the right side door from the deck keeps changing from up to down several times as Judith talks with Alan. While she is preparing to leave Jake with his Dad for the first time. See more »

Quotes

Alan: She just throw me out after ten years!
Charlie: How did you get in my house?
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Crazy Credits

As with the end of every episode, Chuck Lorre always has a paragraph at the end of the episode. This episode production note says: "CHUCK LORRE PRODUCTIONS, #108 When Dharma was cancelled, my heart was broken. Over the next few years my efforts to mend it by creating a new show led to an even deeper emotional nadir when I noticed I had somehow become the author of a seemingly endless succession of failed pilots and pilot scripts. This was not a big enough string of stinkers to lower AOL-Time Warner a stock price (that had already been done by people more incompetant than myself), but my ill-advised attempts at heart-mending were sufficient enough to cause people to not look up from their cobb salads when I ambled into the WB commissary (in Hollywood even has beens amble). But I was indominatable. I kept writing...and failing...and ambling. And then, about a year ago, my good friend and favorite cross-to-bear, Lee Aronsohn, told me he needed to write something fairly quickly in order to keep the Writer's Guild health insurance. Everyone -- friends, agents, execs -- told me not to get involved. They assured me that I was too big, too successful, for such a partnership. You see where this is going. Lee and I wrote "Two and a Half Men". Which brings me to the glaringly obvious spiritual lesson to all this. How do you mend a broken heart? The BeeGees never figured it out, but I did. You help a friend keep that health insurance from lapsing." See more »

Soundtracks

Two and a Half Men Theme
(uncredited)
Written by Chuck Lorre
Performed by Dominik Hauser
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User Reviews

 
Maybe the best pilot ever made!
27 January 2014 | by (Sweden) – See all my reviews

As you probably know, a pilot of a series isn't always perfect, though they sometimes still succeed with catching your interest, since that's what a pilot is supposed to do. "The Simpsons" had a fantastic pilot, but it would take up to "Bart The General" for the humor to become satiric and comedic genius. A lot of characters hadn't arrived yet either. But it's still charming and very sweet. "Family Guy" had a good pilot too, pretty much showcasing how offensive the show would become. However, much funnier episodes would still come after that. "24" had a great pilot, but had an even better season finale, beating out ALL the other episodes in season 1! "The X Files" had a solid and interesting pilot, but the relationship between Mulder and Scully was a little stale there and would take a few episodes to develop further. "South Park" had a goofy, but still pretty funny, pilot. "Two And A Half Men"? Absolutely perfect! Not only is the characters so incredibly well- introduced so quickly, but it's also one of the funniest episodes ever made. This was a show that didn't need to develop much at all, as everything was completely excellent from the very beginning. In fact, it's even one of my favorite episodes, and THAT really says something, doesn't it? If this show doesn't succeed to hook you from here, something is seriously wrong with you. 10 out of 10!


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