Twin Peaks (1990–1991)
8.5/10
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3 user 13 critic

Episode #2.5 

Donna, after discovering that Harold has Laura's secret diary, hatches a risky plan with Maddy to steal it from his home. Andy gets some good news about his condition. Cooper and Truman raid One-Eyed Jack's.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Sheriff Harry S. Truman
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Shelly Johnson (as Madchen Amick)
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Bobby Briggs
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Benjamin Horne
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Audrey Horne
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Dr. Will Hayward (credit only)
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Norma Jennings (credit only)
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James Hurley
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Big Ed Hurley
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Pete Martell (credit only)
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Lucy Moran
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Leland Palmer
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Jocelyn Packard (credit only)
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Storyline

Leland's arraignment is held at the Roadhouse where Judge Sternwood releases him on his own recognizance. Judge Sternwood also rules that Leo Johnson is not competent to stand trial for the sawmill fire. Meanwhile, Donna enlists Maddy's help to help her steal Laura's secret diary away from Harold Smith. Elsewhere, Bobby and Shelly plan to makeover her house to assist Leo's return to take bed-care of him, while Mr. Pinkle gets stuck in a mechanical device showing them how to work it. Cooper figures out that Audrey is being held captive at One-Eyed Jacks and asks Truman to help him sneak into the place to rescue her. Hank is ordered by Ben Horne to follow Cooper to make sure he delivers the ransom money and gets Audrey back. Big Ed brings the crazy and delusional Nadine home from the hospital. At One-Eyed Jacks, Jean Renault plots with Blackie's sister, Nancy, to steal the ransom money for themselves after it is delivered. Also, the mysterious Japanese businessman, Mr. Tojamura, ... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

27 October 1990 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Van Dyke Parks, who plays Leo's lawyer, Mr. Racine, is actually a film composer of some note. He's worked with director Robert Altman on Popeye and The Company, as well as scoring several popluar children's movies such as The Brave Little Toaster and Sesame Street: Follow That Bird. See more »

Goofs

The blood can already be seen on the cultivator before Harold cuts his face with it; this is then furthered when he lightly brushes it against his cheek, leaving a small speck of blood not indicative of a cut (this is again seen before he actually cuts his face). See more »

Quotes

Deputy Andy Brennan: I'm a whole damn town. I'm a whole damn town! Woo!
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Soundtracks

Twin Peaks Theme (Instrumental)
Written by Angelo Badalamenti
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User Reviews

 
a more action packed episode of Peaks
14 October 2017 | by See all my reviews

After an episode full of filler, Twin Peaks sets itself into high gear with this glorious, entertaining, and tense series of essential and fun moments. It perfectly balances the show's weird comedy with its soapy drama and eye gluing mystery while also including some sequences akin to the best of James Bond as Cooper and Sheriff Truman raid One Eyed Jacks in a wild climactic scene that feels like some kind of surrealist comic book. Before this entertaining final showdown are plenty of important and engaging little moments, everything from Leland's court case (that is made surreal thanks to its setting being the Roadhouse, hardly the place for a court case) to Donna's erotic, mesmerizing, and uniquely disturbing girlhood story is riveting and strange to the very core. All in all, this is one of the second season's most successful and perfectly balanced episodes.


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