Biochemist Martin Decker is imprisoned, interrogated, and tortured, but still refuses to reveal a secret formula to his captors. However, his new cell mate's knowledge of teleportation of living matter may provide him with an escape route.

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(as Richard Bugajski)

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(created by), | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Martin Decker
Brent Carver ...
Josef
Peter Boretski ...
Olstroff
Walter Massey ...
Professor
Nicholas Pasco ...
Orderly #1
Al Therrien ...
Orderly #2
Robin Ward ...
Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

Biochemist Martin Decker is imprisoned, interrogated, and tortured, but still refuses to reveal a secret formula to his captors. However, his new cell mate's knowledge of teleportation of living matter may provide him with an escape route.

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11 February 1989 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Quotes

Olstroff: Why did you do the research if you never intended to use it?
Martin Decker: I'm a scientist. You wouldn't understand this, but there are people who believe that ideas have an innate, intrinsic value.
Olstroff: Oh, we believe that ideas have value. Values when applied to the service of the State. You see, until then, they are just worthless, abstract, theoretical equations.
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User Reviews

Cautionary tale, for then and now
21 August 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

It is worth mentioning that the essence of this short episode takes its soul from Orwell's 1984 (published in 1949). It is a cautionary tale about individual freedom vs State control, in which State control seems to be winning the struggle hands-down. The episode was first aired in 1989, a time in (American) history when many "veterans" of the cultural revolutions of the 1960s (including this reviewer) were beginning to sense that their society was becoming more rigid and controlling, both at government levels and in society itself, with the "creep" of dehumanising technology that we once called "automation". In short, individuality and diversity seemed diminished and the State -- and huge corporations -- seemed to be taking over. Even so, it is easy to imagine the great unwashed masses (to coin a phrase!) viewing an allegory like this and easily convincing themselves that this "could never happen here". (Perhaps, for that very reason, it could happen anywhere.) Fast forward a full generation. Viewing the episode 26 years later, this story's depiction of "techniques" of State/social control presents chilling parallels to today's reality. For example, brutality by prison guards against inmates considered to be subhuman (like many of today's sex offenders), or the use of torture to force disclosure of information the State wants (like the water-boarding of today's terrorist suspects). There is no excuse for sex offenders, terrorists, nor other true "bad guys", but it is always helpful to have dramatic/artistic warnings like this episode to remind us that today's scientists, or social activists, or even artists could become tomorrow's "bad guys".


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