The Twilight Zone (1985–1989)
7.9/10
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Examination Day/A Message from Charity 

Puritan Charity Payne in the year 1700 and modern teenager Peter Wood, residents of the same Massachusetts town, are psychically connected due to delirium induced by a bacterial infection, and can see the world through each other's eyes.

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(created by), (teleplay by) (as Philip DeGuere) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Richard Jordan (segment "Examination Day")
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Dickie Jordan (segment "Examination Day")
Elizabeth Norment ...
Ruth Jordan (segment "Examination Day")
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Clerk (segment "Examination Day")
Ed Krieger ...
Clerk #1 (segment "Examination Day")
Myrna White ...
Clerk #2 (segment "Examination Day")
Kerry Noonan ...
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Gerald Hiken ...
Squire Jonas Hacker (segment "A Message from Charity")
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Obadiah Payne (segment "A Message from Charity")
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Aunt Beulah (segment "A Message from Charity")
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Tom Carter (segment "A Message from Charity")
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Ursula Miller (segment "A Message from Charity")
Jack Wells ...
Dr. Maxwell (segment "A Message from Charity")
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Mr. Wood (segment "A Message from Charity")
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Storyline

It's in the not-too-distant future in "Examination Day." A young boy is about to take a very important test. His parents are more nervous than he is. The boy tells his parents not to worry because he knows he'll do well. His parents are worried because they fear he may do too well. Written by Good2Go

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Details

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Release Date:

1 November 1985 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Henry Slesar had previously seen two of his short stories turn into Twilight Zone episodes, in The Twilight Zone: The Old Man in the Cave (1963) and The Twilight Zone: The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross (1964). See more »

Goofs

Charity refers to 1700 as being the first year of the 18th Century. However, it was the last year of the 17th Century. See more »

Quotes

Narrator (segment "A Message from Charity"): [closing narration for "A Message from Charity"] He reached out with his mind, searching for some trace of her... but found only silence. Peter Wood was alone...
Peter Wood (segment "A Message from Charity"): [one year later at school, Peter is finishing his talk to his friends] I got to go. I got trig at one. I'll see you later
Narrator (segment "A Message from Charity"): A new year with new friends and a new confidence and, in time, he began to doubt whether it had ever really happened. Until, one day...
Charity Payne (segment "A Message from Charity"): Peter
Peter Wood (segment "A Message from Charity"): Charity.
Charity Payne (segment "A Message from Charity"): Hi. For a minute, please Peter. Only for a minute. But I had to ...
[...]
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User Reviews

 
Surprisingly good timeslip tale from the Twilight Zone stable
18 April 2015 | by See all my reviews

EXAMINATION DAY is a short and snappy effort based on a story by popular short story writer Henry Slesar. A kid is studying hard for his exams and his parents are really worried about the outcome, although not for the reason you might expect. The execution and acting in this story is poor, but the whole thing hinges on a top class ending which manages to be as crushing as the anti-drug film REQUIEM FOR A DREAM.

A MESSAGE FROM CHARITY is one of the best segments I've yet seen of THE NEW TWILIGHT ZONE. I saw it in two parts, and the extended running time made for a fuller, more satisfying production. It's a straightforward time travel-type storyline in which a young geeky guy from the 1980s finds himself with a psychic connection to a Puritan girl living her life centuries in the past.

Things go swimmingly for a while, but then others find out about the girl's powers and she ends up being accused of witchcraft. The plotting makes great sense actually and the story is fine, with enough of budget to do the historical scenes justice. I also liked the various twists and turns in the narrative. The acting could have been better, but for the most part this is refreshingly decent.


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