Twilight Zone: Season 1, Episode 5

Walking Distance (30 Oct. 1959)
"The Twilight Zone" Walking Distance (original title)

TV Episode  -   -  Fantasy | Horror | Mystery
8.3
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 8.3/10 from 1,426 users  
Reviews: 28 user | 6 critic

A man makes a time travel to his childhood, when he's just a few miles away from his native town.

Director:

Writer:

0Check in
0Share...

Watch Now

$0.00 with Prime Instant Video

Editors' Spotlight

IMDb Picks: October

IMDb's editors share the movies and TV shows they are excited to see in October.


User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 25 titles
created 02 Jul 2011
 
a list of 22 titles
created 10 Sep 2011
 
a list of 25 titles
created 02 Jan 2013
 
a list of 25 titles
created 16 Jul 2013
 
a list of 25 titles
created 20 Jul 2013
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Walking Distance (30 Oct 1959)

Walking Distance (30 Oct 1959) on IMDb 8.3/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Twilight Zone.
« Previous Episode | 5 of 156 Episodes | Next Episode »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Narrator (voice)
...
Martin Sloan
...
Robert Sloan
Irene Tedrow ...
Mrs. Sloan
Michael Montgomery ...
Young Marty
...
Wilcox Boy (as Ronnie Howard)
Byron Foulger ...
Charlie
Sheridan Comerate ...
Gas Station Attendant
Joe Corey ...
Soda Jerk (as Joseph Corey)
Buzz Martin ...
Teenager
Nan Peterson ...
Woman in Park
Pat O'Malley ...
Mr. Wilson
Edit

Storyline

The busy and stress VP of a company Martin Sloan stops his car at a gas station in a road and the attendant tells that he needs to change the oil. Martin sees a warning plate informing that Homewood is 1.5 miles away from the spot and he decides to walk to revisit his hometown. Soon he finds that he has returned to the past and he finds himself and his parents in the place. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 October 1959 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The episode was filmed predominantly at sets built for Meet Me in St. Louis (1959). The carousel used in the episode was a rental. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: [Opening Narration] Martin Sloan, age thirty-six. Occupation: vice-president, ad agency, in charge of media. This is not just a Sunday drive for Martin Sloan. He perhaps doesn't know it at the time - but it's an exodus. Somewhere up the road, he's looking for sanity. And somewhere up the road, he'll find something else.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Super 8 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Artist's Life
(uncredited)
Music by Johann Strauß
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Goes A Long Way.
7 February 2014 | by (Ireland) – See all my reviews

Gig Young plays Martin Sloan in this. There's a second lead character called Sloan in the Rod Serling written 'On Thursday We Leave For Home' in series four. Other surnames that Serling gave to a vital character more than once in a TZ episode are Horn, Koch, and Beechcroft.

'Walking Distance' explores a subject that Serling touched on several times in TZ and 'Night Gallery', that of a man going back to a happier time in his life. Martin Sloan is first seen honking his car horn and looking agitated. He is the vice-president of an ad agency and at thirty-six finds himself by chance within walking distance of Homewood where he grew up. First he meets a little boy (Ron Howard) who says he cant be Martin Sloan and runs away, but Sloan begins to realize the happy days of his childhood are still happening here.

The story is deceptively simple but the message is strong. You only get one unique stab at life and you must cherish the present. Martin Sloan gains a fantastic perspective by chasing after his eleven-year-old self hoping to tell him to enjoy the 'happiest' part of his life. The essence of a carefree childhood can stay a valuable part of you.

The carousel is a good plot device interestingly filmed for showing the elusive and magical quality of childhood happiness that nonetheless is nearer to you than you think. Walking distance actually.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
'You Drive' - a different take on this episode. crockett_john
Anyone Like The 1985 Twilight Zone Series??? enfieldboy
Favorite TZ References nicolbatchellor
He's a robit richie_gribbin
Episodes without a fictional element? crockett_john
Four O'Clock jukebox_lucky
Discuss Walking Distance (1959) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?