Twilight Zone: Season 5, Episode 3

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (11 Oct. 1963)
"The Twilight Zone" Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (original title)

TV Episode  -   -  Fantasy | Horror | Mystery
9.2
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 9.2/10 from 1,412 users  
Reviews: 16 user | 2 critic

A man, newly recovered from a nervous breakdown, becomes convinced that a monster only he sees is damaging the plane he's flying in.

Director:

Writers:

, (created by)
Watch Episode
0Check in
0Share...

Editors' Spotlight

IMDb Picks: August

IMDb's editors share the movies and TV shows they recommend for August 2014.


User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 25 titles
created 24 Nov 2010
 
a list of 25 titles
created 02 Jul 2011
 
a list of 25 titles
created 02 Jan 2013
 
a list of 25 titles
created 20 Jul 2013
 
a list of 37 titles
created 6 months ago
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (11 Oct 1963)

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (11 Oct 1963) on IMDb 9.2/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Twilight Zone.

User Polls

« Previous Episode | 123 of 156 Episodes | Next Episode »

Videos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Christine White ...
Julia Wilson
Ed Kemmer ...
Flight Engineer (as Edward Kemmer)
Asa Maynor ...
Stewardess
Edit

Storyline

Bob Wilson is on a flight when he sees a creature of some sort out on the wing of the aircraft. He's only recently recovered from a nervous breakdown and isn't sure that what he is seeing is real. Every time someone else looks out the window, the creature hides from view. When the creature begins to tamper with one of the engines he begs him wife to tell the pilots to keep an eye on the engines. If they see nothing, he agrees to commit himself to an asylum when they arrive at their destination. His paranoia drives him to a desperate act. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 October 1963 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Richard Matheson originally wanted Patricia Breslin to play Bob Wilson's wife, because she had played a similar role very well in Twilight Zone: Nick of Time (1960). See more »

Goofs

Rain water can be seen trickling strait down Bob's window. In flight the rain water would be blown strait back. At the speed these old planes flew you would only see tiny trickles of water, even in very heavy rainstorms. See more »

Quotes

[last lines]
Narrator: [Closing Narration] The flight of Mr. Robert Wilson has ended now, a flight not only from point A to point B, but also from the fear of recurring mental breakdown. Mr. Wilson has that fear no longer... though, for the moment, he is, as he has said, alone in this assurance. Happily, his conviction will not remain isolated too much longer, for happily, tangible manifestation is very often left as evidence of trespass, even from so intangible a quarter as the Twilight Zone.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Jeopardy!: Episode #26.10 (2009) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Stewardess, Pass Me the Revolver
16 June 2006 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

Pity poor William Shatner. He's just been released from the laughing academy, so now he's on his way home, a little shaky but apparently cured. Except, of course, he's boarded a flight on Twilight Zone Airlines. Trouble is there's a non-paying passenger on board, who looks like the abominable snowman and prefers riding on the wing instead of sampling the delights of the airline's dinner tray. Even worse, he's heck-bent on tearing the wing apart so he can get a look at what makes this 10-ton tin coffin tick. And, naturally, only the recovering looney Shatner sees him. You can imagine the strain.

Rather amusing exercise in personal paranoia as Shatner delivers convincing performance-- still and all, it's hard to take the drama seriously since the snowman appears to have wandered away from a Disneyland parade of warm and fuzzies. And then there's the cop-out ending. For some reason this is one of series' most celebrated entries. I'm not sure why. Maybe it's because some of us have had a similar experience after romancing our favorite 12-pack.


14 of 41 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Only an 8.9? Why is that? crockett_john
What are the most dangerous activities in the Twilight Zone? crockett_john
More things we learned from the Twilight Zone crockett_john
Marathon Snacks? Mee_Too
What came true and what didn't? crockett_john
Distractions in episodes? crockett_john
Discuss Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (1963) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?