The Twilight Zone (1959–1964)
8.3/10
1,133
19 user 3 critic

Deaths-Head Revisited 

A former German SS captain returns to Dachau concentration camp and begins reminiscing on the power he enjoyed there, until he finds himself on trial by those who died at his hands.

Director:

Writers:

, (created by)
Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
ON DISC

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Alfred Becker
...
SS Capt. Gunther Lutze (as Oscar Beregi)
...
Innkeeper (as Karen Verne)
Robert Boon ...
Taxi Driver
...
Edit

Storyline

Gunther Lutze, a former captain in Hitler's SS, decides to return to the area that contains the remnants of Dachau concentration camp. As he revels in the memories of the days when he had tortured prisoners, prisoner Alfred Becker appears before his eyes. What he does not realize is Becker is an ghostly apparition, and plans to put Lutze on "trial" for crimes against humanity for the torture and killing of the prisoners that were held in the camp. It is one trial Lutze may regret. Written by Pat McCurry

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 November 1961 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The storyline states that the Nazis killed 10 million people in its war of terror, which is even more accurate than the number that people use. Most people use an erroneous number; and focus on the 6 million Jews but neglect the total number of lives taken. The chief number of forgotten people included political prisoners, homosexuals, Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses, and anyone who had a less than "ideal" physical specimen. The total amount in human lives was 13 million, not just the 6 million Jews. See more »

Goofs

This episode was set in 1962, 17 years after the end of the war and Dachau is shown as abandoned. However, after the war it remained open, first as a prison and then as a refugee camp until the mid-1960s. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Innkeeper: Yes, sir?
SS Captain Gunther Lutze: I've just arrived in town. Do you have accommodations here?
Innkeeper: I can give you a lovely front room overlooking the square. Would you care to see it?
SS Captain Gunther Lutze: I'm sure it will be satisfactory.
[signs in; the innkeeper looks at his face with a frightened look, he looks up]
SS Captain Gunther Lutze: Yes? Anything wrong?
Innkeeper: No, sir.
[looks at what Lutze signed]
Innkeeper: Mr. Schmidt.
[...]
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Everybody Wants Some!! (2016) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Word About Drama
10 July 2006 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

An arrogant SS captain returns years later to the extermination camp over which he formerly presided.

Perhaps this episode reveals something about the nature of drama. There should at least be some element of conflict or moral ambiguity if a story is to generate anything like the dramatic tension that will either entertain, provoke, or instruct. The trouble with this entry-- well-meaning though it is-- is that it lacks both conflict or any hint of moral ambiguity in its characters and plotting. Instead, it takes the easy way out and we get a dressed-up half-hour lecture on the fact that sin (genocide) is bad. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying the message lacks merit. Quite the contrary. I'm saying it has so much merit, that the issue of genocide shouldn't be reduced to a one-dimensional cardboard Nazi monster that the audience can easily disassociate from. A more entertaining and instructive approach would soften the evil captain with a few recognizably human traits that would force the audience to ask the right kind of questions that can't be easily disassociated from. Again, I'm not questioning the morality of the message; I'm assessing the artistic value of the episode itself. And the fact that it has very little undercuts the instructive value. If ever a half-hour needed a big dose of TZ imagination, this is it. Too bad that Serling fell back on the facile and formulaic. The subject matter deserves better.


25 of 61 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?