Trackdown (1957–1959)
8.2/10
12
1 user

The Reward 

Hoby tracks down a missing florist with a rare orchid, who may hold the key to missing bank money and three fugitive bank robbers.

Director:

(as Donald McDougall)

Writer:

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Hoby Gilman
...
Millie
...
Bannion
...
Robert Murchison
Russ Bender ...
Sheriff John Kemp
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Joe Garth
...
Sal Hendricks
Val Dufour ...
Mort Williams
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Storyline

Hoby tracks down a missing florist with a rare orchid, who may hold the key to missing bank money and three fugitive bank robbers.

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Genres:

Western

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Details

Language:

Release Date:

3 January 1958 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

First television role of Pernell Roberts. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: An odd sight: a man with a gun and a man with the soil side by side. But perhaps not so odd. Never has it been truer than in the American West where progress made strange bed fellows.
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User Reviews

 
Strange one
22 July 2011 | by See all my reviews

Okay, I must say that this episode was sort of strange. We have a florist (new one on me) in the West and he just received an expensive orchid. How it made it to the West, I'll never know...Anyways, the man's show at and cowardly runs away. Hoby then uses the orchid as a clue to the cowardly florist's where-abouts.

This episode isn't BAD, but it was strange and a bit unbelievable, hence why I only gave it 8 stars. Of course, the last time Hoby was in Alpine (episode 7) was much more memorable. If I remember right, Hoby was asked to leave instead of investigating the reason his co-worker was killed.

So yeah, this one was strange!


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