Gambler Joe Sunday comes to Porter with a court order to take possession of his baby daughter from his mother Cindy who plays the piano in the saloon. Hoby has to enforce the order over the objections of Henrietta and the whole town.

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Peter Leeds ...
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Cindy
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Pete
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Loafer (as Bill Fawcett)
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Joe Sunday
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Storyline

Gambler Joe Sunday comes to Porter with a court order to take possession of his baby daughter from his mother Cindy who plays the piano in the saloon. Hoby has to enforce the order over the objections of Henrietta and the whole town.

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Genres:

Western

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Release Date:

21 November 1958 (USA)  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Quotes

Henrietta Porter: You do that Hoby Gilman and I'll never speak to you again - or mention you kindly in print.
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User Reviews

 
Kind of different
22 October 2011 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

First of all, let me comment again on Ellen Corby. I just LOVE this woman! She has such a spit fire attitude. I loved her "You do that, Hoby Gilman and I'll never speak to you again!" Like how many times has she threatened that. I also loved how Ralph went against Hoby's orders, then is like all "I guess I'll just leave now" just to get Hoby to tell him he wants him to stay (they did something similar in Gunsmoke more than once with Chester mentioning his leaving and Matt 'convincing' him to stay).

That said, I think there was a big moral issue here. Is a baby better off with her mother or father? When you have two parents who love the child, how does one decide who gets that baby? The mother worked in a saloon and served drinks. The father drank in a saloon and played cards. Hoby, of course, doesn't have to make the decision since the choice was made up for him. But he did have a point when he told Henrietta that men can be loving fathers just as well as woman can be loving mothers. I'm sure back in the 1950's, that was probably frowned upon though...

Great ending! I loved seeing James Best in this role - he doesn't always have to be the bad guy! He can be a "good ol' boy"


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